Search results for 'Heidegger's philosophy of science' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  34
    Trish Glazebrook (2000). Heidegger's Philosophy of Science. Fordham University Press.
    This book concerns itself with an issue that is not sufficiently addressed in the literature: Heidegger’s philosophy of science. Although a great deal of attention is paid to Heidegger’s later critique of technology, no one has systematically studied how he understood “science.” Many readers will be surprised to learn, through this book, that Heidegger developed the essentials of a fairly sophisticated philosophy of science, one that in many ways invites comparison with that of Thomas Kuhn. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  2.  48
    Robert Shaw (2013). The Implications for Science Education of Heidegger's Philosophy of Science. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (5):546-570.
    Science teaching always engages a philosophy of science. This article introduces a modern philosophy of science and indicates its implications for science education. The hermeneutic philosophy of science is the tradition of Kant, Heidegger, and Heelan. Essential to this tradition are two concepts of truth, truth as correspondence and truth as disclosure. It is these concepts that enable access to science in and of itself. Modern science forces aspects of reality (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. M. Esfeld (2002). Trish Glazebrook, Heidegger's Philosophy of Science. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (3):300-301.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  10
    Vincenzo Crupi (2003). Trish Galzebrook, Heidegger's Philosophy of Science. Human Studies 26 (1):133-139.
  5.  25
    Joseph Rouse (1985). Heidegger's Later Philosophy of Science. Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):75-92.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6. C. E. Clifford & D. E. Cooper (1991). Angus, IH George Grant's Platonic Rejoinder to Heidegger.(Lewiston, Edwin Mellen Press, 1987). Arendt, H. Philosophy and Politics, Social Research 57, 1990. Ballard, EG Heidegger's View and Evaluation of Nature and Natural Science in J. Sallis (Ed.), Heidegger and the Path of Thinking (Pittsburgh, Duquesne University. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 32 (3):323-340.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  42
    Fredrik Svenaeus (2013). The Relevance of Heidegger's Philosophy of Technology for Biomedical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (1):1-15.
    Heidegger’s thoughts on modern technology have received much attention in many disciplines and fields, but, with a few exceptions, the influence has been sparse in biomedical ethics. The reason for this might be that Heidegger’s position has been misinterpreted as being generally hostile towards modern science and technology, and the fact that Heidegger himself never subjected medical technologies to scrutiny but was concerned rather with industrial technology and information technology. In this paper, Heidegger’s philosophy of modern technology is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8.  12
    S. Kaufer (2001). Heidegger's Philosophy of Science. Philosophical Review 110 (4):626-629.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  3
    Ruth Irwin (2010). Climate Change and Heidegger's Philosophy of Science. Essays in Philosophy 11 (1):4.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  5
    John D. Caputo (1986). Heidegger's Philosophy of Science: The Two Essences of Science. In Joseph Margolis, Michael Krausz & Richard M. Burian (eds.), Rationality, Relativism, and the Human Sciences. M. Nijhoff 43--60.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11.  11
    Stephan Käufer (2001). Heidegger's Philosophy of Science. Philosophical Review 110 (4):626-629.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  1
    Radu Mihail Oancea (2002). Heidegger's Philosophy of Science. Studia Phaenomenologica 2 (1-2):289-293.
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  14
    Denis McManus (1999). The Rediscovery of Heidegger's Worldly Subject by Analytic Philosophy of Science. The Monist 82 (2):324-346.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  14. Babette Babich (2007). Continental Philosophy of Science. In Constantin Boundas (ed.), The Edinburgh Companion to the Twentieth Century Philosophies. Edinburgh. University of Edinburgh Press 545--558.
    Continental philosophies of science tend to exemplify holistic themes connecting order and contingency, questions and answers, writers and readers, speakers and hearers. Such philosophies of science also tend to feature a fundamental emphasis on the historical and cultural situatedness of discourse as significant; relevance of mutual attunement of speaker and hearer; necessity of pre-linguistic cognition based in human engagement with a common socio-cultural historical world; role of narrative and metaphor as explanatory; sustained emphasis on understanding questioning; truth seen (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  20
    Lin Ma & Jaap van Brakel (2014). Heidegger's Thinking on the “Same” of Science and Technology. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (1):19-43.
    In this article, we trace and elucidate Heidegger’s radical re-thinking on the relation between science and technology from about 1940 until 1976. A range of passages from the Gesamtausgabe seem to articulate a reversal of the primacy of science and technology in claiming that “Science is applied technology.” After delving into Heidegger’s reflection on the being of science and technology and their “coordination,” we show that such a claim is essentially grounded in Heidegger’s idea that “ (...) and technology are the Same [das Selbe].” In addition, we argue that, although different ontic epochs can be distinguished in the evolvement of science and/or technology, for Heidegger there is only one unique ontological Epoch of modernity that encompasses various ontic epochs. Therefore, the change from an “epoch of objectivity” to an “epoch of orderability [Bestellbarkeit]” cannot be considered to be an ontological shift. Furthermore, it is not right to ascribe to Heidegger the view that the development of quantum physics signals the beginning of a new ontological Epoch. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  11
    Paul O'mahoney (2011). Opposing Political Philosophy and Literature: Strauss's Critique of Heidegger and the Fate of the'Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry'. Theoria 58 (126):73-96.
    Strauss's critique of Heidegger's philosophy aims at a recovery of political philosophy, which he saw as threatened by Heidegger's radical historicism; for Strauss, philosophy as a whole could not survive without political philosophy, and his return to the classical tradition of political philosophy, while inspired by the work of Heidegger, was directed against what he saw as the nihilism that was its consequence. Here I wish to examine a dimension of Strauss's critique which, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  3
    Joseph J. Kockelmans (1985). On the Truth of Being: Reflections on Heidegger's Later Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
    Joseph J. Kockelmans provides a clear and systematic treatment of the central themes and topics of Heidegger's later writings, focusing on the all-important question of the relationship of truth and Being. If we are to understand Heidegger's thought, Kockelmans explains, we must conceive it as a path or way, rather than as a finished system. Adopting this approach himself, Kockelmans leads us with scholarly care through the wide range of issues that Heidegger wrote about between roughly 1935 and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18. Mejame Ejede Charley (2009). Problematic of Technology and the Realms of Salvation in Heidegger's Philosophy. Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 14 (2).
    The aim of this paper is the exploration of Heidegger's interpretation of the phenomenon of technology against the background of his new vision of reality. It can be said that in this context sin which was formerly moral and religious became in our age, as it were, technological. Because man has distanced himself from the Nature, he finds himself at the same time alienated and guilty, contemplating, like a child brazen in the brainlessness of what he has done and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  2
    Thomas Mormann (1999). Critical Idealism Revisited: Recent Work on Cassirer’s Philosophy of Science. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 6:295-306.
    In the first third of this century Cassirer was one of the leading, most influential philosophers of the German-speaking world. He was the respected opponent of such giants as Husserl, Russell, Schlick, Heidegger or Carnap who left their mark on the philosophical landscape until this very day. One might recall his discussion with Schlick on the philosophical relevance of Einstein’s relativity theory in the first decade of this century. Carnap reported to have received essential ideas for the Logical Construction of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  21
    Frederic L. Bender (1984). Heidegger's Hermeneutical Grounding of Science. Philosophy Research Archives 10:203-238.
    It is argued that, despite the neglect which Heidegger’s writings on science have generally received, the “fundamental ontology” of Being and Time reveals certain structures of experience crucial for our understanding of science; and that, as these insights cast considerable doubt upon the validity of the empiricist/positivist conception of science, Heidegger deserves considerably better treatment as an incipient philosopher of science than has been the case thus far. His arguments for the distortive effects of the alleged (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  6
    Istvan V. Kiraly (2010). The Foundation of Philosophy and Atheism in Heidegger's Early Works - Prolegomena to an Existential-Ontological Perspective. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (22):115-128.
    The paper analyzes, from a perspective which is itself existential-ontological, the way in which in an early text of Martin Heidegger, Phänomenologische Interpretationen zu Aristoteles (Anzeige der hermeneutischen Situation) [1922] – which had already outlined some determinative elements of the ideas expounded in Being and Time –, the meditation on the always living and current conditions and hermeneutical situation of philosophizing expanded in fact into an inquiry about the origins, grounds, essence and sense of philosophy as such. Meditation in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  12
    Dmitri Ginev (2015). Heidegger’s Concept of “Authentic Historical Science”. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 36 (1):3-25.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Mark Blitz (1981). Heidegger's Being and Time and the Possibility of Political Philosophy. Cornell University Press.
  24.  37
    Iain Thomson (2004). Heidegger's Perfectionist Philosophy of Educationin Being and Time. Continental Philosophy Review 37 (4):439-467.
    In Heidegger on Ontotheology: Technology and the Politics of Education, I argue that Heidegger’s ontological thinking about education forms one of the deep thematic undercurrents of his entire career, but I focus mainly on Heidegger’s later work in order to make this case. The current essay extends this view to Heidegger’s early magnum opus, contending that Being and Time is profoundly informed – albeit at a subterranean level – by Heidegger’s perfectionist thinking about education. Explaining this perfectionism in terms of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  25. Harold Alderman (1978). Heidegger's Critique of Science and Technology. In Michael Murray (ed.), Heidegger and Modern Philosophy: Critical Essays. Yale University Press 35--50.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  5
    Scott M. Campbell (2012). The Early Heidegger's Philosophy of Life: Facticity, Being, and Language. Fordham University Press.
    Science and the originality of life -- Christian facticity -- Grasping life as a topic -- Ruinance -- The retrieval of history -- Facticity and ontology -- Factical speaking -- Rhetoric -- Sophistry.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  7
    Trish Glazebrook (2001). The Role of the Beiträge in Heidegger’s Critique of Science. Philosophy Today 45 (1):24-32.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  15
    Mary Jeanne Larrabee, Michael Goldman & Robert J. Dostal (1985). Book Reviews. John Sallis (Ed.): 'Husserl and Contemporary Thought'. Patrick A. Heelan: 'Space-Perception and the Philosophy of Science'. Ernst Orth (Ed.): 'Zeit Und Zeitlichkeit Bei Husserl Und Heidegger (Phanomenologische Forschungen, Volume 14)'. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 2 (1).
    Husserl and Contemporary Thought contains twelve essays that address certain key themes in Husserl's thought, each in some way confronting issues critical to the Husserlian project. The essays first appeared in the 1982 volume of Research in Phenornenology. The "contemporary thought" in the title should be understood in a limited sense as refer- ring to certain strains of thinking pursued in the present decade, build- ing however on past research. The volume shows several directions in which contemporary thinkers are taking (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Cecilia Tohaneanu (2010). De ce este necesară examinarea dimensiunii politice a filosofiei lui Heidegger?/Why is it necessary to analyze the political dimension of Heidegger’s philosophy? Sfera Politicii (148).
    This paper aims at emphasizing the relevance of scrutinizing the link between Heidegger’s theory of Being and his Nazi commitment. Significant investigations of such a link, beginning with that of Victor Farias, have challenged the „official” view that Heidegger’s theory of Being is politically neutral. That this theory could not have been deprived of political intentions is proven by Heidegger’s own view on philosophy as a search that stems from life and ends in life, namely as a Dasein’s way (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  41
    Robert S. Gall (2014). Knowing, Counting, Being: Meillassoux, Heidegger and the Possibility of Science. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 28 (3):335-345.
    In his book After Finitude, Quentin Meillassoux criticizes post-Kantian philosophy for its inability to explain how science is able to describe a world without human beings. This paper addresses that challenge through a consideration of Heidegger’s thought and his thinking about science. It is argued that the disagreement between Meillassoux and Heidegger comes down to a question of first philosophy and the priority of logic or ontology in philosophy. Ultimately, Heidegger’s emphasis on ontology in (...) is superior in its ability to give a more comprehensive account of science and thinking about things themselves. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  1
    Bernhard Radloff (2003). Heidegger's Retrieval of Aristotle and the Relation of Volk and Science in the Rector's Address of 1933. Philosophy Today 47 (1):3-22.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Herman Philipse (1998). Heidegger's Philosophy of Being: A Critical Interpretation. Princeton University Press.
    This scrupulously researched and rigorously argued book is the first to interpret and evaluate the central topic of Martin Heidegger's philosophy--his celebrated "Question of Being"--in the context of the full range of Heidegger's thought. With this comprehensive approach, Herman Philipse distinguishes in unprecedented ways the center from the periphery, the essential from the incidental in Heidegger's philosophy. Among other achievements, this allows him to shed new light on the controversial relationship between Heidegger's life and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  33.  18
    Babette Babich (2011). Towards a Critical Philosophy of Science: Continental Beginnings and Bugbears, Whigs, and Waterbears. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (4):343-391.
    Continental philosophy of science has developed alongside mainstream analytic philosophy of science. But where continental approaches are inclusive, analytic philosophies of science are not?excluding not merely Nietzsche?s philosophy of science but Gödel?s philosophy of physics. As a radicalization of Kant, Nietzsche?s critical philosophy of science puts science in question and Nietzsche?s critique of the methodological foundations of classical philology bears on science, particularly evolution as well as style (in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  34.  16
    Dimitri Ginev (2005). Against the Politics of Postmodern Philosophy of Science. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 19 (2):191 – 208.
    This paper discusses the tenets of the politics of postmodern philosophy of science. At issue are Rouse's version of naturalism and his reading of Quine's distinction between the indeterminacy of translation and the underdetermination of theories by empirical evidence. I argue that the postmodern approach to science's research practices as patterns of interaction within the world is not in line with the naturalistic account Rouse aims at. I focus also on Rouse's readings of Heidegger's existential conception (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35.  24
    Patrick A. Heelan & Jay Schulkin (1998). Hermeneutical Philosophy and Pragmatism: A Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] Synthese 115 (3):269-302.
    Two philosophical traditions with much in common, (classical) pragmatism and (Heidegger's) hermeneutic philosophy, are here\ncompared with respect to their approach to the philosophy of science. Both emphasize action as a mode of interpreting experience.\nBoth have developed important categories – inquiry, meaning, theory, praxis, coping, historicity, life-world – and each has\noffered an alternative to the more traditional philosophies of science stemming from Descartes, Hume, and Comte. Pragmatism's\nabduction works with the dual perspectives of theory (as explanation) and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  36.  20
    Adam Buben (2013). Heidegger's Reception of Kierkegaard: The Existential Philosophy of Death. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (5):967 - 988.
    After briefly drawing attention to two key strains in the history of philosophy's dealings with death, the Platonic and the Epicurean, I describe a more recent philosophical alternative to viewing death in terms of this ancient dichotomy. This is the alternative championed by the likes of S?ren Kierkegaard, the father of existentialism, and Martin Heidegger, whose work on death tends to overshadow Kierkegaard's despite the undeniable influence exerted on him by the nineteenth century Dane. By exploring this influence, a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  14
    Patrick A. Hellan (1998). Hermeneutical Philosophy and Pragmatism: A Philosophy of Science. Synthese 115 (3):269-302.
    Two philosophical traditions with much in common, (classical) pragmatism and (Heidegger's) hermeneutic philosophy, are here compared with respect to their approach to the philosophy of science. Both emphasize action as a mode of interpreting experience. Both have developed important categories – inquiry, meaning, theory, praxis, coping, historicity, life-world – and each has offered an alternative to the more traditional philosophies of science stemming from Descartes, Hume, and Comte. Pragmatism's abduction works with the dual perspectives of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  38.  3
    Julian Young (2004). Heidegger's Philosophy of Art. Cambridge University Press.
    This book, the first comprehensive study in English of Heidegger's philosophy of art, starts in the mid-1930s with Heidegger's discussion of the Greek temple and his Hegelian declaration that a great artwork gathers together an entire culture in affirmative celebration of its foundational 'truth', and that, by this criterion, art in modernity is 'dead'. His subsequent work on Hölderlin, whom he later identified as the decisive influence on his mature philosophy, led him into a passionate engagement (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  39.  1
    Alfred Denker (2000). Historical Dictionary of Heidegger's Philosophy. Scarecrow Press.
    By the time Martin Heidegger passed away on May 26th, 1976, he had become the most important and controversial philosopher of his age. While many of his former students had become important philosophers and thinkers in their own right, Heidegger also inspired countless others, like Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, and Jean-Paul Sartre. The second edition of the Historical Dictionary of Heidegger's Philosophy is an historical perspective on the development of Heidegger's thought in all its nuancesand facets. Schalow (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  40.  5
    David Clarke (2014). Heidegger, Hermeneutics and History: Undermining Jeff Malpas's Philosophy of Place. Philosophia 42 (3):571-591.
    Most works about the philosophy of Martin Heidegger either disregard Heidegger’s attachment to National Socialism or assume the ‘minimalist’ view that his attachment was a brief political aberration of no consequence for his philosophy. This paper contends that the minimalist view is not only factually wrong but also that its assumption promotes methodological errors and poor philosophy. To assess this contention we examine two important texts from one of the more fertile fields in current philosophy: (...) Malpas’s Heidegger’s Topology: Being, Place, World (2006) and Heidegger and the Thinking of Place (2012). Malpas claims that Heidegger’s rejection of National Socialism spurred, or was concomitant with, new directions in his philosophy. These claims are wrong. The paper concludes that any work about Heidegger’s philosophy must first acknowledge and understand his enduring attachment to National Socialism. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  91
    Andrew Feenberg (2000). The Ontic and the Ontological in Heidegger's Philosophy of Technology: Response to Thomson. Inquiry 43 (4):445 – 450.
    Iain Thomson's critique is persuasive on several points but not on the major issue, the relation of the ontological to the ontic in Heidegger's philosophy of technology. This reply attempts to show that these two dimensions of Heidegger's theory are closely related, at least in the technological domain, and not separate, as Thomson affirms. It is argued that Heidegger's evaluations of particular technologies, the flaws of which Thomson concedes, proceed from a flawed ontological conception.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42. Shawn Loht (forthcoming). The Relevance of Heidegger's Conception of Philosophy for the Film-as-Philosophy Debate. Film and Philosophy 19.
    Provides an account of philosophy adopted from Being and Time and later works of Heidegger in order to respond to key questions in the film-as-philosophy debate. I follow the school of Stanley Cavell, Robert Sinnerbrink, and Stephen Mulhall in the view that philosophy occurs in film in phenomenological ways that transcend mere argumentative discourse and logical analysis. Some of the views I counter include those of Bruce Russell and Paisley Livingston.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  43
    Matheson Russell (2011). Phenomenology and Theology: Situating Heidegger's Philosophy of Religion. Sophia 50 (4):641-655.
    This essay considers the philosophical and theological significance of the phenomenological analysis of Christian faith offered by the early Heidegger. It shows, first, that Heidegger poses a radical and controversial challenge to philosophers by calling them to do without God in an unfettered pursuit of the question of being (through his ‘destruction of onto-theology’); and, second, that this exclusion nonetheless leaves room for a form of philosophical reflection upon the nature of faith and discourse concerning God, namely for a (...) of religion in a phenomenological mode (as exemplified most clearly in Heidegger’s 1920/21 lectures on the phenomenology of religious life). However, it is argued that the theological roots of Heidegger’s own phenomenological analyses subvert his frequently asserted claim concerning the incompatibility of Christian faith and philosophical inquiry. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  13
    Richard F. H. Polt (2006). The Emergency of Being: On Heidegger's Contributions to Philosophy. Cornell University Press.
    He describes this most private work of Heidegger's philosophy as "a dissonant symphony that imperfectly weaves together its moments into a vast fugue, under the ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  45.  33
    Brian Gregor (2007). Formal Indication, Philosophy, and Theology: Bonhoeffer's Critique of Heidegger. Faith and Philosophy 24 (2):185-202.
    This paper examines Heidegger’s account of the proper relation between philosophy and theology, and Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s critique thereof. Part I outlines Heidegger’s proposal for this relationship in his lecture “Phenomenology and Theology,” where he suggests that philosophy might aid theology by means of ‘formal indication.’ In that context Heidegger never articulates what formal indication is, so Part II exposits this obscure notion by looking at its treatment in Heidegger’s early lecture courses, as well as its roots in Husserl. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  9
    Ladislav Kvasz (2013). Heidegger's Interpretation of Mathematical Science in the Light of Husserl's Concept of Mathematization in the Krisis. Philosophia Naturalis 50 (2):337-363.
    There are many interpretations of the birth of modern science. Most of them are, nevertheless, confined to the analysis of certain historical episodes or technical details, while leaving the very notion of mathematization unanalyzed. In my opinion this is due to a lack of a proper philosophical framework which would show the process of mathematization as something radically new. Most historians assume that the world is just like it is depicted by science. Thus they are not aware of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  1
    Lorraine Markotic (2016). Paternity, Enframing, and a New Revealing: O'Brien's Philosophy of Reproduction and Heidegger's Critique of Technology. Hypatia 31 (1):123-139.
    This article seeks to demonstrate the importance of the philosophical work of Mary O'Brien. It does so by showing how O'Brien's work counters Heidegger's strict differentiation between the ancient Greek metaphysics of presence and modern technological thinking. O'Brien's ideas indicate two critical lacunae in Heidegger's interpretation of the ancient Greeks: the latter's attempt to secure paternity and their overlooking of birth as a form of unconcealment. According to O'Brien, the way in which we understand and experience human reproduction (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  4
    Frank Schalow (2010). Historical Dictionary of Heidegger's Philosophy. Scarecrow Press.
    This second edition of Historical Dictionary of Heidegger's Philosophy examines the development of Martin Heidegger's thought in all its nuances and facets.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  2
    Carlos Alberto Sánchez (2013). On Heidegger's "Thin" Eurocentrism and the Possibility of a "Mexican" Philosophy. Radical Philosophy Review 16 (3):763-780.
    This paper considers the nature of Heidegger’s Eurocentrism in regard to philosophy. Focusing primarily on “A Dialogue on Language,” I argue, first, that Heidegger recognizes the limits of the Eurocentric idea of philosophy and proposes its overcoming. Secondly, I suggest that the proposal to overcome philosophy is made in an attempt to protect philosophy from the encroachment of an otherness that challenges its very identity. This leads me to the view, thirdly, that Heidegger’s Eurocentrism about (...) is compromising insofar as he is willing, to a certain degree, to let go of philosophy’s European origin. This “thinning” out of Heidegger’s Eurocentrism, finally, opens the door to a consideration of the possibility for a non-Western, namely, a Latin American, or Mexican “philosophy.”. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  14
    Peter Capretto (2014). The Wonder and Spirit of Phenomenology and Theology: Rubenstein and Derrida on Heidegger's Formal Distinction of Philosophy From Theology. Heythrop Journal 55 (4):599-611.
    While Heidegger's earlier phenomenological writings inform much contemporary discourse in the continental philosophy of religion, his 1927 essay on ‘Phenomenology and Theology’ offers a largely uncontested distinction between philosophy and theology on the basis of their possibilities as sciences following ontological difference. This paper reconsiders Heidegger's distinction by invoking spirit and wonder, concepts Jacques Derrida and Mary-Jane Rubenstein have more recently emphasized as central to thought that is open to that which ruptures metaphysical schemas. I contend (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000