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  1. Heidi E. Grasswick (2010). Scientific and Lay Communities: Earning Epistemic Trust Through Knowledge Sharing. Synthese 177 (3):387 - 409.
    Feminist philosophers of science have been prominent amongst social epistemologists who draw attention to communal aspects of knowing. As part of this work, I focus on the need to examine the relations between scientific communities and lay communities, particularly marginalized communities, for understanding the epistemic merit of scientific practices. I draw on Naomi Scheman's argument (2001) that science earns epistemic merit by rationally grounding trust across social locations. Following this view, more turns out to be relevant to epistemic assessment than (...)
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  2. Heidi E. Grasswick (2008). From Feminist Thinking to Ecological Thinking: Determining the Bounds of Community. Hypatia 23 (1):150-160.
  3. Heidi E. Grasswick (2008). Mapping the Maze of Feminist Philosophy of Science. Metascience 17 (2):231-235.
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  4. Heidi E. Grasswick (2004). Individuals-in-Communities: The Search for a Feminist Model of Epistemic Subjects. Hypatia 19 (3):85-120.
    : Feminist epistemologists have found the atomistic view of knowers provided by classical epistemology woefully inadequate. An obvious alternative for feminists is Lynn Hankinson Nelson's suggestion that it is communities that know. However, I argue that Nelson's view is problematic for feminists, and I offer instead a conception of knowers as "individuals-in-communities." This conception is preferable, given the premises and goals of feminist epistemologists, because it emphasizes the relations between knowers and their communities and the relevance of these relations for (...)
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  5. Heidi E. Grasswick (2004). The Science and Social World of Sex and Sexuality. Hypatia 19 (3):203-208.
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  6. Heidi E. Grasswick (2004). Book Review: Anne Fausto-Sterling. The Science and Social World of Sex and Sexuality: A Review of Sexing the Body: Gender Politics and the Construction of Sexuality New York: Basic Books, 2000; and Edward Stein. The Mismeasure of Desire: The Science, Theory, and Ethics of Sexual Orientation. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (3):203-208.
  7. Heidi E. Grasswick & Mark Owen Webb (2002). Feminist Epistemology as Social Epistemology. Social Epistemology 16 (3):185 – 196.
    More than one philosopher has expressed puzzlement at the very idea of feminist epistemology. Metaphysics and epistemology, sometimes called the 'core' areas of philosophy, are supposed to be immune to questions of value and justice. Nevertheless, many philosophers have raised epistemological questions starting from feminist-motivated moral and political concerns. The field is burgeoning; a search of the Philosopher's Index reveals that although nothing was published before 1981 that was categorized as both feminist and epistemology, soon after, the rate of publication (...)
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  8. Heidi E. Grasswick (2001). The Normative Failure of Fuller's Social Epistemology. Social Epistemology 16 (2):133 – 148.
    One of the major themes of Steve Fuller's project of social epistemology is a reconciliation of the normative concerns of epistemologists with the empirical concerns of sociologists of knowledge. Fuller views social epistemologists as knowledge policy makers, who will provide direction for improvements in the cognitive division of labour. However, this paper argues that Fuller's conception of knowledge production and his approval of a panglossian approach to epistemology fail to provide the normative force he claims, and leave us unable to (...)
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