Search results for 'Heidi Kjærnet' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. E. Heidi (2002). Grasswick, Mark Owen Webb, Feminist Epistemology as Social Epistemology. Social Epistemology 16 (3).score: 30.0
     
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  2. Heidi M. Hurd (2000). Heidi M. Hurd. Legal Theory 6 (4):423-455.score: 18.0
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  3. Gail Schwab (2011). Sharing the World. By Luce Irigaray and Teaching. Edited by Luce Irigaray with Mary Green and Conversations by Luce Irigaray with Stephen Pluháček and Heidi Bostic, Judith Still, Michael Stone, Andrea Wheeler, Gillian Howie, Margaret R. Miles and Laine M. Harrington, Helen A. Fielding, Elizabeth Grosz, Michael Worton, and Birgitte H. Hidttun. [REVIEW] Metaphilosophy 42 (3):328-340.score: 15.0
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  4. Peter Alward, Comments on Heidi Tiedke’s €Œis Knowledge Ever Constitutive of Freedom?€.score: 15.0
               According to Tiedke, in order for an act to be free it must satisfy two requirements: (PR) The agent must have been the source of the action. (PAP) It must have been possible for the agent to have done otherwise. Different accounts of freedom cash these conditions out in different ways. The Standard Compatibilist offers the following versions of these principles: (PRSC) The agent’s choice was a link in the (...)
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  5. Fritz J. McDonald (2014). Review of Heidi M. Ravven, The Self Beyond Itself: An Alternative History of Ethics, the New Brain Sciences, and the Myth of Free Will. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 7 (2):251-252.score: 15.0
    The Self Beyond Itself is a defense of an incompatibilist, hard determinist view of free will. Free will is here defined in a very strong sense, as the existence of actions that do not result from any causes other than the agent herself. The question of how to define free will, especially whether it consists in the ability to do otherwise, and what the ability to do otherwise amounts to, is not given much consideration in this book.Ravven frames her work (...)
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  6. William Myers (1993). A Comment on Heidi Storl's “the Risks of Going Natural”. Southwest Philosophy Review 9 (2):114-116.score: 15.0
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  7. Thaddeus Metz (2001). Review of Heidi Hurd, Moral Combat. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 110 (3):434-436.score: 15.0
  8. Interpreting Authorities (1995). Heidi M. Hurd. In Andrei Marmor (ed.), Law and Interpretation: Essays in Legal Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 405.score: 15.0
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  9. J. T. Payne (2005). Review of Heidi Zogbaum, Kisch in Australia: The Untold Story (Melbourne, Scribe Publications, 2004). [REVIEW] Dialogue 3 (1):215-216.score: 15.0
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  10. Colleen M. Seguin (2011). Heidi Breuer, Crafting the Witch: Gendering Magic in Medieval and Early Modern England.(Studies in Medieval History and Culture.) New York and London: Routledge, 2009. Pp. Xii, 190. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (2):473-475.score: 15.0
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  11. R. Silvey (2001). John Paul Jones III, Heidi Nast and Susan Roberts (Eds), Thresholds in Feminist Geography; Difference, Methodology, Representation. Ethics Place and Environment 4:286-290.score: 15.0
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  12. Mohamad Al-Hakim (2010). Making Room for Hate Crime Legislation in Liberal Societies. Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (3):341-358.score: 9.0
    There is a divide within political and legal theory concerning the justification of hate-crime legislation in liberal states. Opponents of Hate-Crime Legislation have recently argued that enhanced punishment for hate-motivated crimes cannot be justified within political liberal states. More specifically, Heidi Hurd argues that criminal sanction which target character dispositions unfairly target individuals for characteristics not readily under their control. She further argues that a ‘character’ based approach in criminal law is necessarily illiberal and violates the state’s commitment to (...)
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  13. Heidi M. Hurd (1999). Moral Combat. Cambridge University Press.score: 6.0
    This book explores the thesis that legal roles force people to engage in moral combat, an idea which is implicit in the assumption that citizens may be morally required to disobey unjust laws, while judges may be morally required to punish citizens for civil disobedience. Heidi Hurd advances the surprising argument that the law cannot require us to do what morality forbids. The 'role-relative' understanding of morality is shown to be incompatible with both consequentialist and deontological moral philosophies. In (...)
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  14. Heidi M. Ravven & Lenn Evan Goodman (eds.) (2002). Jewish Themes in Spinoza's Philosophy. State University of New York Press.score: 6.0
    CHAPTER 1 Introduction HEIDI M. RAVVEN AND LENN E. GOODMAN The attitudes of Jewish thinkers toward Spinoza have defined a fault line between traditionalist ...
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  15. Glenn Ehrstine (2010). Heidy Greco-Kaufmann, Zuo der Eere Gottes, ufferbuwung dess mentschen und der statt Lucern lob: Theater und szenische Vorgänge in der Stadt Luzern im Spätmittelalter und in der Frühen Neuzeit, 1: Historischer Abriss; 2 (with Regula Gámiz-Brunner and Manfred Veraguth): Quellenedition. (Theatrum Helveticum, 11.) Zurich: Chronos, 2009. 1: pp. 669; 217 black-and-white and color figures. 2: pp. xiii, 402 plus CD-ROM. €91.59. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (4):964-966.score: 5.0
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  16. Heidi Savage, Four Problems with Empty Names.score: 3.0
    Empty names vary in their referential features. Some of them, as Kripke argues, are necessarily empty -- those that are used to create works of fiction. Others appear to be contingently empty -- those which fail to refer at this world, but which do uniquely identify particular objects in other possible worlds. I argue against Kripke's metaphysical and semantic reasons for thinking that either some or all empty names are necessarily non-referring, because these reasons are either not the right reasons (...)
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  17. Heidi Savage, What Matters in Survival: Life Trajectories and the Possibility of Virtual Immersion.score: 3.0
    The immediate goal of this paper is to establish that one can both agree with Parfit that identity is not what matters in survival and yet still maintain that the concept of a persisting person requires singularity over time. That is, fission cannot preserve what matters in survival. This can be maintained once one recognizes an externalist constraint on preserving what matters. Specifically, I claim that what matters in the survival of persons is something Parfit might call the “quasi-continuation” of (...)
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  18. Heidi L. Maibom (2008). The Mad, the Bad, and the Psychopath. Neuroethics 1 (3):167-184.score: 3.0
    It is common for philosophers to argue that psychopaths are not morally responsible because they lack some of the essential capacities for morality. In legal terms, they are criminally insane. Typically, however, the insanity defense is not available to psychopaths. The primary reason is that they appear to have the knowledge and understanding required under the M’Naghten Rules. However, it has been argued that what is required for moral and legal responsibility is ‘deep’ moral understanding, something that psychopaths do not (...)
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  19. Heidi Lene Maibom (2005). Moral Unreason: The Case of Psychopathy. Mind and Language 20 (2):237-57.score: 3.0
    Psychopaths are renowned for their immoral behavior. They are ideal candidates for testing the empirical plausibility of moral theories. Many think the source of their immorality is their emotional deficits. Psychopaths experience no guilt or remorse, feel no empathy, and appear to be perfectly rational. If this is true, sentimentalism is supported over rationalism. Here, I examine the nature of psychopathic practical reason and argue that it is impaired. The relevance to morality is discussed. I conclude that rationalists can explain (...)
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  20. Heidi Savage, Descriptive Names and Shifty Characters: A Context-Sensitive Account.score: 3.0
    Standard rigid designator accounts of a name’s meaning have trouble accommodating what I will call a descriptive name’s “shifty” character -- its tendency to shift its referent over time in response to a discovery that the conventional referent of that name does not satisfy the description with which that name was introduced. I offer a variant of Kripke’s historical semantic theory of how names function, a variant that can accommodate the character of descriptive names while maintaining rigidity for proper names. (...)
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  21. Heidi M. Hurd (2001). Why Liberals Should Hate ``Hate Crime Legislation''. Law and Philosophy 20 (2):215 - 232.score: 3.0
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  22. Heidi Tiedke (2011). Proper Names and Their Fictional Uses. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (4):707 - 726.score: 3.0
    Fictional names present unique challenges for semantic theories of proper names, challenges strong enough to warrant an account of names different from the standard treatment. The theory developed in this paper is motivated by a puzzle that depends on four assumptions: our intuitive assessment of the truth values of certain sentences, the most straightforward treatment of their syntactic structure, semantic compositionality, and metaphysical scruples strong enough to rule out fictional entities, at least. It is shown that these four assumptions, taken (...)
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  23. Heidi Savage, Literal Truth and the Habits of Sherlock Holmes.score: 3.0
    Because names from fiction, names like ‘Sherlock Holmes’, fail to refer, and because it has been supposed that all simple predicative sentences including a sentence like ‘Sherlock Holmes smokes’ will be true if and only if the referent of the name has the property encoded by the predicate, many philosophers have denied that the sentence or an utterance of the sentence ‘Sherlock Holmes smokes’ could be true, or at least, it cannot be true taken at face value. Despite this, natural (...)
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  24. Heidi Savage, On Being Called Names.score: 3.0
    A recent defence of analyzing names as predicates that relies on a calling relation to explain their meanings,an account developed by Fara, is claimed to escape the problems afflicting standard meta-linguistic analyses. For Fara, this is because the calling relation itself is not essentially meta-linguistic; there are attributive uses of the calling relation as well. Distinguishing between meta-linguistic and attributive notions of calling is supposed to disperse with the common objection to calling accounts, specifically, Kripke's objection that these kinds of (...)
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  25. Heidi L. Maibom (2009). Feeling for Others: Empathy, Sympathy, and Morality. Inquiry 52 (5):483-499.score: 3.0
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  26. Heidi Maibom (2010). The Descent of Shame. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 80 (3):566 - 594.score: 3.0
    Shame is a painful emotion concerned with failure to live up to certain standards, norms, or ideals. The subject feels that she falls in the regard of others; she feels watched and exposed. As a result, she feels bad about the person that she is. The most popular view of shame is that someone only feels ashamed if she fails to live up to standards, norms, or ideals that she, herself, accepts. In this paper, I provide support for a different (...)
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  27. Heidi E. Grasswick & Mark Owen Webb (2002). Feminist Epistemology as Social Epistemology. Social Epistemology 16 (3):185 – 196.score: 3.0
    More than one philosopher has expressed puzzlement at the very idea of feminist epistemology. Metaphysics and epistemology, sometimes called the 'core' areas of philosophy, are supposed to be immune to questions of value and justice. Nevertheless, many philosophers have raised epistemological questions starting from feminist-motivated moral and political concerns. The field is burgeoning; a search of the Philosopher's Index reveals that although nothing was published before 1981 that was categorized as both feminist and epistemology, soon after, the rate of publication (...)
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  28. Heidi Savage, (Public Address) No Means No: Feminist and Victim Understandings of Sexual Assault Awareness.score: 3.0
    While there are many different motivations for raising questions about the Sexual Assault Awareness Movement, at least one motivation comes from feminist controversies about what counts as consensual sex. Historically, this controversy arose between those known as "anti-pornography feminists", and "sex positive feminists" whose proponents had very different understandings of what counts as sexual autonomy for women. It is important to understand that questioning the current definitions of what counts as an instance of sexual assault does not entail an anti-feminist (...)
     
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  29. Heidi E. Grasswick (2004). Book Review: Anne Fausto-Sterling. The Science and Social World of Sex and Sexuality: A Review of Sexing the Body: Gender Politics and the Construction of Sexuality New York: Basic Books, 2000; and Edward Stein. The Mismeasure of Desire: The Science, Theory, and Ethics of Sexual Orientation. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (3):203-208.score: 3.0
  30. Michael Moore & Heidi Hurd (2011). Punishing the Awkward, the Stupid, the Weak, and the Selfish: The Culpability of Negligence. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (2):147-198.score: 3.0
    Negligence is a problematic basis for being morally blamed and punished for having caused some harm, because in such cases there is no choice to cause or allow—or risk causing or allowing—such harm to occur. The standard theories as to why inadvertent risk creation can be blameworthy despite the lack of culpable choice are that in such cases there is blame for: (1) an unexercised capacity to have adverted to the risk; (2) a defect in character explaining why one did (...)
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  31. Heidi E. Keller & Sandra Lee (2003). Ethical Issues Surrounding Human Participants Research Using the Internet. Ethics and Behavior 13 (3):211 – 219.score: 3.0
    The Internet appears to offer psychologists doing research unrestricted access to infinite amounts and types of data. However, the ethical issues surrounding the use of data and data collection methods are challenging research review boards at many institutions. This article illuminates some of the obstacles facing researchers who wish to take advantage of the Internet's flexibility. The applications of the APA ethical codes for conducting research on human participants on the Internet are reviewed. The principle of beneficence, as well as (...)
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  32. Heidi Maibom & James Harold (2010). Without Taste: Psychopaths and the Appreciation of Art. la Nouvelle Revue Française d'Esthétique 6:151-63.score: 3.0
    Psychopaths are the bugbears of moral philosophy. They are often used as examples of perfectly rational people who are nonetheless willing to do great moral wrong without regret; hence the disorder has received the epithet “moral insanity” (Pritchard 1835). But whereas philosophers have had a great deal to say about psychopaths’ glaring and often horrifying lack of moral conscience, their aesthetic capacities have received hardly any attention, and are generally assumed to be intact or even enhanced. Popular culture often portrays (...)
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  33. Heidi Lene Maibom (2007). The Presence of Others. Philosophical Studies 132 (2):161-190.score: 3.0
    Hybrid accounts of folk psychology maintain that we sometimes theorize and sometimes simulate in order to understand others. An important question is why this is the case. In this paper, I present a view according to which simulation, but not theory, plays a central role in empathy. In contrast to others taking a similar approach to simulation, I do not focus on empathy’s cognitive aspect, but stress its affective-motivational one. Simulating others’ emotions usually engages our motivations altruistically. By vicariously feeling (...)
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  34. Heidi Storl (2008). Heidegger in Woolf's Clothing. Philosophy and Literature 32 (2):pp. 303-314.score: 3.0
    What is it that we human beings are? What is it that we do? The reduction of these questions to biology doesn't do justice to how we think and act, nor do traditional philosophical approaches satisfy our intuitions. Fortunately, it's not in our nature to give up. While minds and bodies, subjects and objects, do play a role, to focus here is to miss the mark. Underlying each of these is something more fundamentally human. Martin Heidegger thinks of this as (...)
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  35. Heidi Maibom (2010). What Experimental Evidence Shows Us About the Role of Emotions in Moral Judgement. Philosophy Compass 5 (11):999-1012.score: 3.0
    In empirically minded research, it is widely agreed that emotions play an important, even essential, role in moral judgment. Experimental research on moral development, psychopathology, helping behavior, moral judgment, and moral justification has been used to support different new forms of sentimentalism. This article reviews this evidence critically and proposes that although it suggests that emotions play a role in moral judgment, it does so in a more limited way than is often assumed to be the case. Some evidence shows (...)
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  36. Heidi Grasswick, Feminist Social Epistemology. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 3.0
  37. Heidi Maibom, Feeling for Others: Empathy and Sympathy as Sources of Moral Motivation.score: 3.0
    According to the Humean theory of motivation, we only have a reason to act if we have both a belief and a pro-attitude. When it comes to moral reasons, it matters a great deal what that pro-attitude is; pure self-interest cannot combine with a belief to form a moral reason. A long tradition regards empathy and sympathy as moral motivators, and recent psychological evidence supports this view. I examine what I take to be the most plausible version of this claim: (...)
     
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  38. Mark Alfano & Abrol Fairweather (eds.) (forthcoming). Epistemic Situationism. Oxford University Press.score: 3.0
    INTRODUCTION Abrol Fairweather, San Francisco State University -/- PART 1: The situationist challenge to virtue epistemology 1. Mark Alfano, Princeton University & University of Oregon 2. John Doris & Lauren Olin, Washington University in St. Louis 3. John Turri, University of Waterloo -/- PART 2: Defending virtue epistemology 4. James Montmarquet, Tennessee State University 5. Ernest Sosa, Rutgers 6. Jason Baehr, Loyola Marymount University 7. John Greco, St. Louis University 8. Berit Brogaard, University of Missouri-St. Louis 9. Guy Axtell, Radford (...)
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  39. Heidi Lene Maibom (2003). The Mindreader and the Scientist. Mind and Language 18 (3):296-315.score: 3.0
    Among theory theorists, it is commonly thought that folk psychological theory is tacitly known. However, folk psychological knowledge has none of the central features of tacit knowledge. But if it is ordinary knowledge, why is it that we have difficulties expressing anything but a handful of folk psychological generalisations? The reason is that our knowledge is of theoretical models and hypotheses, not of universal generalisations. Adopting this alternative view of (scientific) theories, we come to see that, given time and reflection, (...)
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  40. Heidi M. Ravven (2001). Some Thoughts on What Spinoza Learned From Maimonides About the Prophetic Imagination: Part 1. Maimonides on Prophecy and the Imagination. Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (2):193-214.score: 3.0
  41. Heidi M. Silcox (2010). What's Wrong with Alienation? Philosophy and Literature 34 (1):pp. 131-144.score: 3.0
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  42. Heidi M. Hurd (2010). Introduction Symposium on Crime and Culpability. Law and Philosophy 29 (4):371-372.score: 3.0
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  43. Heidi L. Maibom (2007). Social Systems. Philosophical Psychology 20 (5):557 – 578.score: 3.0
    It used to be thought that folk psychology is the only game in town. Focusing merely on what people do will not allow you to predict what they are likely to do next. For that, you must consider their beliefs, desires, intentions, etc. Recent evidence from developmental psychology and fMRI studies indicates that this conclusion was premature. We parse motion in an environment as behavior of a particular type, and behavior thus construed can feature in systematizations that we know. Building (...)
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  44. Terje Sagvolden, Espen Borgå Johansen, Heidi Aase & Vivienne Ann Russell (2005). A Dynamic Developmental Theory of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Predominantly Hyperactive/Impulsive and Combined Subtypes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):397-419.score: 3.0
    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is currently defined as a cognitive/behavioral developmental disorder where all clinical criteria are behavioral. Inattentiveness, overactivity, and impulsiveness are presently regarded as the main clinical symptoms. The dynamic developmental behavioral theory is based on the hypothesis that altered dopaminergic function plays a pivotal role by failing to modulate nondopaminergic (primarily glutamate and GABA) signal transmission appropriately. A hypofunctioning mesolimbic dopamine branch produces altered reinforcement of behavior and deficient extinction of previously reinforced behavior. This gives rise to delay (...)
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  45. Heidi Savage, Kypris, Aphrodite, and Venus: Another Puzzle About Belief.score: 3.0
    My aim in this paper is to show that the existence of empty names raise problems for the Millian that go beyond the traditional problems of accounting for their meanings. Specifically, they have implications for Millian strategies for dealing with puzzles about belief. The standard move of positing a referent for a fictional name to avoid the problem of meaning, because of its distinctly Millian motivation, implies that solving puzzles about belief, when they involve empty names, do in fact hang (...)
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  46. Kenneth Simons (2011). When is Negligent Inadvertence Culpable? Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (2):97-114.score: 3.0
    Doug Husak suggests that sometimes an actor should be deemed reckless, and not merely negligent, with respect to the risks that she knowingly created but has forgotten at the moment of action. The validity of this conclusion, he points out, depends crucially on what it means to be aware of a risk. Husak’s neutral prompt and counterfactual actual belief criteria are problematic, however. More persuasive is his suggestion that we understand belief, in this moral and criminal law context, as a (...)
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  47. Heidi M. Ravven (2001). Some Thoughts on What Spinoza Learned From Maimonides on the Prophetic Imagination: Part Two: Spinoza's Maimonideanism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (3):385-406.score: 3.0
  48. Heidi Westerlund (2008). Justifying Music Education: A View From Here-and-Now Value Experience. Philosophy of Music Education Review 16 (1):79-95.score: 3.0
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  49. Heidi Armbruster & Anna Lærke (eds.) (2008). Taking Sides: Ethics, Politics, and Fieldwork in Anthropology. Berghahn Books.score: 3.0
    This volume, written by a new generation of scholars engaged with contemporary global movements for social justice and peace, reflects their efforts in trying ...
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  50. Orly Fuhrman, Kelly McCormick, Eva Chen, Heidi Jiang, Dingfang Shu, Shuaimei Mao & Lera Boroditsky (2011). How Linguistic and Cultural Forces Shape Conceptions of Time: English and Mandarin Time in 3D. Cognitive Science 35 (7):1305-1328.score: 3.0
    In this paper we examine how English and Mandarin speakers think about time, and we test how the patterns of thinking in the two groups relate to patterns in linguistic and cultural experience. In Mandarin, vertical spatial metaphors are used more frequently to talk about time than they are in English; English relies primarily on horizontal terms. We present results from two tasks comparing English and Mandarin speakers’ temporal reasoning. The tasks measure how people spatialize time in three-dimensional space, including (...)
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