Search results for 'Heidi M. Giebel' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Heidi M. Giebel (2007). Forbidding Intentional Mutilation: Some Unintended Consequences? International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (4):467-476.score: 870.0
    In a recent IPQ article, Christopher Kaczor gave a promising argument in which he strove to reconcile the common belief that obstetric craniotomy (the crushing of nearlyborn fetuses’ heads) is immoral with his clear and intuitively attractive account of intention. One of Kaczor’s crucial assumptions is that intentional mutilation is morally impermissible. In this article I argue that Kaczor’s analysis has three potential problems: (1) the mutilating features of craniotomy do not appear to meet Kaczor’s criteria for being intended, so (...)
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  2. Heidi M. Giebel (2008). Forbidding Intentional Mutilation. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (4):467-476.score: 870.0
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  3. H. M. Giebel (2007). Ends, Means, and Character: Recent Critiques of the Intended-Versus-Forseen Distinction and the Principle of Double Effect. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (3):447-468.score: 240.0
    In this essay I first provide a brief explanation of the principle of double effect (PDE) and the propositions that it entails regarding the distinction betweenintention and foresight (I/F distinction) and the distinction’s relevance to ethical evaluation. Then I address several recent critiques of PDE and the I/F distinctionby influential ethicists including Judith Jarvis Thomson, Tom Beauchamp and James Childress, and Jonathan Bennett. I argue that none of these critiques issuccessful. In the process of refuting the critiques, I also give (...)
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  4. Heidi Giebel & Tonia Bock (2012). Teaching Virtue. Teaching Philosophy 35 (4):345-366.score: 240.0
    What effect, if any, can we expect undergraduate ethics courses to have on students’ ethical beliefs, self-concept, and behavior? After a brief discussion of apparent theoretical and practical obstacles to moral education in ethics courses, we explain and discuss our effort to provide preliminary answers to that question via an empirical study of students enrolled in several sections of our university’s Introductory Ethics course. We found modest but statistically significant effects in many areas, which seem to indicate that those who (...)
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  5. Heidi Giebel (2010). Ethics Without Controversy? Teaching Philosophy 33 (4):363-374.score: 240.0
    In this article I argue that, despite my previous strongly held beliefs to the contrary, a focused-theory approach to teaching Introductory Ethics (meaning that one theory or family of theories is the main focus of the course) is a legitimate and effective way to introduce undergraduate students to philosophical ethics. There are at least three advantages to the focused-theory approach to teaching ethics: increased depth of learning, avoidance of relativism (or “theory-relativism”) as a default position, and opportunity for moral education. (...)
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  6. H. M. Giebel (2006). The Separate Minds of Church and State. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:141-150.score: 240.0
    Claims regarding collective or group mental states are fairly commonplace: we speak of things like the belief of the Church, the will of the faculty, and the opinion of the Supreme Court, often without considering what such claims really mean and whether they are true in any interesting sense. In this paper I take a threefold approach: first, I articulate several ways in which a group might be said to have beliefs and other mental states. Second, I explore the implications, (...)
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  7. H. M. Giebel (2006). Intelligence and the Philosophy of Mind. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:141-150.score: 240.0
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  8. Heidi Giebel (2012). The Ethics of Abortion. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 86 (2):380-383.score: 240.0
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  9. H. M. Giebel (unknown). The Separate Minds of Church and State: Collective Mental States and Th Eir Unsettling Implications. :141-150.score: 240.0
    Claims regarding collective or group mental states are fairly commonplace: we speak of things like the belief of the Church, the will of the faculty, and the opinion of the Supreme Court, often without considering what such claims really mean and whether they are true in any interesting sense. In this paper I take a threefold approach: first, I articulate several ways in which a group might be said to have beliefs and other mental states. Second, I explore the implications, (...)
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  10. Christopher Kaczor (2007). Intention, Foresight, and Mutilation: A Response to Giebel. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (4):477-482.score: 46.0
    According to H. M. Giebel, at least three difficulties arise for my view of intention, foresight, and mutilation. First, I must either give up my account of the intention/foresight distinction or conclude that obstetric craniotomy does not constitute mutilation. Secondly, my account of the intention/foresight distinction leads to counter-intuitive conclusions such as that surgical sterilization is impermissible but removal of non-functioning limbs against the will of the possessor is morally permissible. Thirdly, she suggests that my account of mutilation is (...)
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  11. Dyfri Williams, F. Brommer & M. Whittall (1981). Die Parthenon-Skulpturen: Metopen, Fries, Giebel, KultbildThe Sculptures of the Parthenon: Metopes, Frieze, Pediments, Cult-Statue. Journal of Hellenic Studies 101:212.score: 24.0
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