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  1. Heidi M. Ravven (2012). Maimonides Non-Kantian Moral Psychology: Maimonides and Kant on the Garden of Eden and the Genealogy of Morals. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 20 (2):199-216.
    Both Immanuel Kant and Moses Maimonides wrote lengthy treatments of the biblical garden of Eden. For both philosophers the biblical story served as an opportunity to address the genealogy of morals. I argue here that the two treatments offer deep insights into their respective philosophical anthropologies, that is to say, into their assessments of the human person and of moral psychology. Contrary to much that has been written about Maimonides as a proto-Kantian, I expose the profoundly different and even opposed (...)
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  2. Heidi Morrison Ravven (2009). What Spinoza Can Teach Us About Embodying and Naturalizing Ethics. In Moira Gatens (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Benedict Spinoza. Pennsylvania State University Press.
     
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  3. Heidi M. Ravven (2004). Judaism and Enlightenment (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (3):343-345.
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  4. Heidi M. Ravven (2003). Hegel's Epistemic Turn—Or Spinoza's? Idealistic Studies 33 (2/3):195-202.
    This paper takes issue with Slavoj Zizek's constructed opposition between Spinoza and Hegel. Where Zizek views Hegel's non-dualistic relational epistemology as a substantial improvement over Spinoza's purported dogmatic account of a reality which is external to the perceiver, I argue that Hegel inherited such an epistemology from Spinoza. Ultimately, it is Spinoza who provides Hegel with the conceptual tools for knowledge of the "transphenomenal" within the context of human finitude.
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  5. Heidi Morrison Ravven (2003). Spinoza’s Anticipation of Contemporary Affective Neuroscience. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):257-290.
    Spinoza speculated on how ethics could emerge from biology and psychology rather than disrupt them and recent evidence suggests he might have gotten it right. His radical deconstruction and reconstruction of ethics is supported by a number of avenues of research in the cognitive and neurosciences. This paper gathers together and presents a composite picture of recent research that supports Spinoza’s theory of the emotions and of the natural origins of ethics. It enumerates twelve naturalist claims of Spinoza that now (...)
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  6. Heidi M. Ravven & Lenn Evan Goodman (eds.) (2002). Jewish Themes in Spinoza's Philosophy. State University of New York Press.
    CHAPTER 1 Introduction HEIDI M. RAVVEN AND LENN E. GOODMAN The attitudes of Jewish thinkers toward Spinoza have defined a fault line between traditionalist ...
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  7. Heidi Miriam Ravven (2002). Further Thoughts on Hegel and Feminism. The Owl of Minerva 33 (2):223-231.
  8. Heidi M. Ravven (2001). Some Thoughts on What Spinoza Learned From Maimonides About the Prophetic Imagination: Part 1. Maimonides on Prophecy and the Imagination. Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (2):193-214.
  9. Heidi M. Ravven (2001). Some Thoughts on What Spinoza Learned From Maimonides on the Prophetic Imagination: Part Two: Spinoza's Maimonideanism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (3):385-406.
  10. Heidi M. Ravven (2001). The Garden of Eden. Philosophy and Theology 13 (1):3-51.
    Spinoza uses the interpretation of Adam’s disobedience in the Garden of Eden to mount a biblical defense of the life devoted to intellectual pursuits. In his philosophic rereading of the biblical story, Spinoza follows the lead of Maimonides in the Guide to the Perplexed Part I, chapter 2. Both philosophers invoked the biblical text to lend authority to the view that moral consciousness, in contrast with the intellectual, marks a decline in the human condition. This paper explores Spinoza’s dependence on (...)
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  11. Heidi Morrison Ravven (1998). Did Spinoza Get Ethics Right? Some Insights From Recent Neuroscience. Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 14:56-91.
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  12. Heidi M. Ravven (1994). A Response to James Pinkerton. The Owl of Minerva 26 (1):101-102.
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  13. Heidi M. Ravven (1992). A Response to “Why Feminists Should Take the Phenomenology of Spirit Seriously”. The Owl of Minerva 24 (1):63-69.
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  14. Heidi M. Ravven (1990). Spinoza's Materialist Ethics. International Studies in Philosophy 22 (3):59-78.
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  15. Heidi M. Ravven (1989). Notes on Spinoza's Critique of Aristotle's Ethics. Philosophy and Theology 4 (1):3-32.
    I argue that Spinoza’s ethical theory may be viewed as a transformation of Aristotle’s teleological account which has been corrected of several fundamental flaws which Spinoza found in Aristotle. The result of Spinoza’s redefinition of ethical activity is a developmental account of ethics which has close kinship with the views of process theoreticians.
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  16. Heidi M. Ravven (1988). Has Hegel Anything to Say to Feminists? The Owl of Minerva 19 (2):149-168.
  17. Heidi M. Ravven (1986). Some Hegelian Phenomenological and Philosophical Comments on the Liturgy for the Days of Awe. The Owl of Minerva 18 (1):57-66.
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