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Heidi L. Maibom [11]Heidi Maibom [10]Heidi Lene Maibom [7]
  1. Heidi Maibom, Feeling for Others: Empathy and Sympathy as Sources of Moral Motivation.
    According to the Humean theory of motivation, we only have a reason to act if we have both a belief and a pro-attitude. When it comes to moral reasons, it matters a great deal what that pro-attitude is; pure self-interest cannot combine with a belief to form a moral reason. A long tradition regards empathy and sympathy as moral motivators, and recent psychological evidence supports this view. I examine what I take to be the most plausible version of this claim: (...)
     
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  2. Heidi Maibom, I Feel What You Think.
    Psychological ascriptions are most commonly understood to be Machiavellian and objective (Dennett 1987, Fodor 1987, Heal 1986, Whiten & Byrne 1988). We ascribe thoughts, feelings, and desires to others to better understand them. Since we must cooperate, compete, or simply co-exist with others, the more we know about their psychology the better. Being aimed at understanding others—in relative independence from us—psychological ascriptions are objective. Such ascriptions are also Machiavellian to the extent that their ultimate aim is to help us plan (...)
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  3. Heidi Maibom & Fred Bennett, Patriotic Virtue.
    Some philosophers argue that the state and its citizens stand in a morally privileged position vis-à-vis one another but not towards other states or citizens. However, many of those people, particularly philosophical liberals, also hold that morally insignificant differences, such as place of birth, sex, or ethnicity, should not affects rights, liberties, and life prospects. On the face of it, these two sets of ideas appear incompatible and point to a conflict in some liberal thought. Liberal philosophers, like John Rawls, (...)
     
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  4. Heidi Maibom (ed.) (forthcoming). Empathy and Morality. Oxford University Press.
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  5. Heidi L. Maibom (forthcoming). Review: Carla Bagnoli, Ed., Morality and the Emotions. [REVIEW] Philosophical Explorations.
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  6. Heidi L. Maibom (2014). Bagnoli , Carla , Ed. Morality and the Emotions . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 304. $65.00 (Cloth). Ethics 124 (2):384-388.
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  7. Heidi L. Maibom (2014). To Treat a Psychopath. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (1):31-42.
    Some people are now quite optimistic about the possibility of treating psychopathy with drugs that directly modulate brain function. I argue that this optimism is misplaced. Psychopathy is a global disorder in an individual’s worldview, including his social and moral outlook. Because of the unity of this Weltanschauung, it is unlikely to be treatable in a piecemeal fashion. Recent neuroscientific methods do not give us much hope that we can replace, in a wholesale manner, problematic views of the world with (...)
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  8. Heidi Lene Maibom (2014). Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives, Edited by Amy Coplan and Peter Goldie. Mind 123 (491):880-882.
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  9. Heidi L. Maibom (2013). Psychopathy. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  10. Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson & Heidi Maibom (2012). Introduction. In Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson & Heidi Lene Maibom (eds.), Neurofeminism: Issues at the Intersection of Feminist Theory and Cognitive Science. Palgrave Macmillan.
  11. Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson & Heidi Lene Maibom (eds.) (2012). Neurofeminism: Issues at the Intersection of Feminist Theory and Cognitive Science. Palgrave Macmillan.
  12. Heidi Maibom (2012). In a Different Voice? In Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson & Heidi Lene Maibom (eds.), Neurofeminism: Issues at the Intersection of Feminist Theory and Cognitive Science. Palgrave Macmillan.
  13. Heidi Maibom (2010). The Descent of Shame. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 80 (3):566 - 594.
    Shame is a painful emotion concerned with failure to live up to certain standards, norms, or ideals. The subject feels that she falls in the regard of others; she feels watched and exposed. As a result, she feels bad about the person that she is. The most popular view of shame is that someone only feels ashamed if she fails to live up to standards, norms, or ideals that she, herself, accepts. In this paper, I provide support for a different (...)
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  14. Heidi Maibom (2010). What Experimental Evidence Shows Us About the Role of Emotions in Moral Judgement. Philosophy Compass 5 (11):999-1012.
    In empirically minded research, it is widely agreed that emotions play an important, even essential, role in moral judgment. Experimental research on moral development, psychopathology, helping behavior, moral judgment, and moral justification has been used to support different new forms of sentimentalism. This article reviews this evidence critically and proposes that although it suggests that emotions play a role in moral judgment, it does so in a more limited way than is often assumed to be the case. Some evidence shows (...)
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  15. Heidi L. Maibom (2010). Imagining Others. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 5 (1):34-49.
    It is often argued that the ability to imagine what others think and feel is central to moral functioning. In this paper, I consider to what extent this is true. I argue that neither the ability to think of others as having representational mental states, nor the ability to imagine being in their position, is necessary for moral understanding or moral motivation. I go on to argue that the area in which thinking about others’ thoughts and feelings appears to play (...)
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  16. Heidi L. Maibom (2010). Rationalism, Emotivism, and the Psychopath. In Luca Malatesti & John McMillan (eds.), Responsibility and Psychopathy: Interfacing Law, Psychiatry and Philosophy. Oup Oxford.
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  17. Heidi Maibom & James Harold (2010). Without Taste: Psychopaths and the Appreciation of Art. la Nouvelle Revue Française d'Esthétique 6:151-63.
    Psychopaths are the bugbears of moral philosophy. They are often used as examples of perfectly rational people who are nonetheless willing to do great moral wrong without regret; hence the disorder has received the epithet “moral insanity” (Pritchard 1835). But whereas philosophers have had a great deal to say about psychopaths’ glaring and often horrifying lack of moral conscience, their aesthetic capacities have received hardly any attention, and are generally assumed to be intact or even enhanced. Popular culture often portrays (...)
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  18. Heidi Maibom (2009). In Defence of (Model) Theory Theory. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (6-8):6-8.
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  19. Heidi L. Maibom (2009). Feeling for Others: Empathy, Sympathy, and Morality. Inquiry 52 (5):483-499.
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  20. Heidi L. Maibom (2008). The Mad, the Bad, and the Psychopath. Neuroethics 1 (3):167-184.
    It is common for philosophers to argue that psychopaths are not morally responsible because they lack some of the essential capacities for morality. In legal terms, they are criminally insane. Typically, however, the insanity defense is not available to psychopaths. The primary reason is that they appear to have the knowledge and understanding required under the M’Naghten Rules. However, it has been argued that what is required for moral and legal responsibility is ‘deep’ moral understanding, something that psychopaths do not (...)
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  21. Heidi Lene Maibom (2008). Review: Karsten R. Stueber: Rediscovering Empathy: Agency, Folk Psychology, and the Human Sciences. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (466):525-529.
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  22. Heidi L. Maibom (2007). Social Systems. Philosophical Psychology 20 (5):557 – 578.
    It used to be thought that folk psychology is the only game in town. Focusing merely on what people do will not allow you to predict what they are likely to do next. For that, you must consider their beliefs, desires, intentions, etc. Recent evidence from developmental psychology and fMRI studies indicates that this conclusion was premature. We parse motion in an environment as behavior of a particular type, and behavior thus construed can feature in systematizations that we know. Building (...)
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  23. Heidi Lene Maibom (2007). The Presence of Others. Philosophical Studies 132 (2):161-190.
    Hybrid accounts of folk psychology maintain that we sometimes theorize and sometimes simulate in order to understand others. An important question is why this is the case. In this paper, I present a view according to which simulation, but not theory, plays a central role in empathy. In contrast to others taking a similar approach to simulation, I do not focus on empathy’s cognitive aspect, but stress its affective-motivational one. Simulating others’ emotions usually engages our motivations altruistically. By vicariously feeling (...)
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  24. Heidi L. Maibom (2005). David E. Ohreen, The Scope and Limits of Folk Psychology: A Socio-Linguistic Approach Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 25 (4):288-290.
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  25. Heidi Lene Maibom (2005). Moral Unreason: The Case of Psychopathy. Mind and Language 20 (2):237-57.
    Psychopaths are renowned for their immoral behavior. They are ideal candidates for testing the empirical plausibility of moral theories. Many think the source of their immorality is their emotional deficits. Psychopaths experience no guilt or remorse, feel no empathy, and appear to be perfectly rational. If this is true, sentimentalism is supported over rationalism. Here, I examine the nature of psychopathic practical reason and argue that it is impaired. The relevance to morality is discussed. I conclude that rationalists can explain (...)
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  26. Heidi Lene Maibom (2003). Review: Mind in Everyday Life and Cognitive Science. [REVIEW] Mind 112 (447):493-496.
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  27. Heidi Lene Maibom (2003). The Mindreader and the Scientist. Mind and Language 18 (3):296-315.
    Among theory theorists, it is commonly thought that folk psychological theory is tacitly known. However, folk psychological knowledge has none of the central features of tacit knowledge. But if it is ordinary knowledge, why is it that we have difficulties expressing anything but a handful of folk psychological generalisations? The reason is that our knowledge is of theoretical models and hypotheses, not of universal generalisations. Adopting this alternative view of (scientific) theories, we come to see that, given time and reflection, (...)
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  28. Heidi L. Maibom (2000). Tacit Knowledge and Folk Psychology. Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 35:95.
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