Search results for 'Helen Bradford' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  8
    Helen Bradford (2000). Peasants, Historians, and Gender: A South African Case Study Revisited,1850–1886. History and Theory 39 (4):86–110.
    A gender revolution allegedly occurred in the British Cape Colony in the nineteenth century. African patriarchs, traditionally pastoralists, took over women's agricultural work, adopted Victorian gender attributes, and became prosperous peasants . Scholars have accepted the plausibility of these seismic shifts in masculinity, postulated in Colin Bundy's classic, The Rise & Fall of the South African Peasantry. I re-examine them, for Bundy's "Case Study" of Herschel, acclaimed as one of the regions that best fits his thesis. This Case Study omits (...)
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  2.  5
    C. A. Helen (2009). On Your Head Be It Sworn: Oath and Virtue in Euripides'Helen. Classical Quarterly 59:1-7.
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  3.  1
    C. A. Helen (2009). On Your Head Be It Sworn: Oath and Virtue in Euripides'Helen. Classical Quarterly 59:1-7.
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  4.  2
    Jane Fowler Morse (2007). The Preposterous Theory of Helen Bradford Thompson: Men's and Women's Intelligence is Similar in Quantity and Quality. Education and Culture 23 (2):39-43.
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  5. Gwen Bradford (2015). Achievement. OUP Oxford.
    Gwen Bradford presents the first systematic account of what achievements are, and why they are worth the effort. She argues that more things count as achievements than we might have thought, and offers a new perfectionist theory of value in which difficulty, perhaps surprisingly, plays a central part in characterizing achievements.
     
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  6. Roger Bradford (1996). Children, Families and Chronic Disease: Psychological Models of Care. Routledge.
    Chronic childhood disease brings psychological challenges for families and carers as well as the children. Roger Bradford explores how they cope with these challenges, the psychological and social factors that influence outcomes and the ways in which the delivery of services can be improved to promote adjustment. Drawing on concepts from health psychology and family therapy, the author proposes a multi-level model of care which takes into account the child, the family and the wider care system and how they (...)
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  7.  4
    Richard Bradford (1994). Roman Jakobson: Life, Language and Art. Routledge.
    In Roman Jakobson Richard Bradford reasserts the value of Jakobson's work, arguing that he has a great deal to offer contemporary critical theory and providing a critical appraisal the sweep of Jakobson's career. Bradford re-establishes Jakobson's work as vital to our understanding of the relationship between language and poetry. By exploring Jakobson's thesis that poetry is the primary object language, Roman Jakobson: Life, Language, Art offers a new reading of his work which includes the most radical elements of (...)
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  8.  4
    Helen Harrison (2013). Father Francis Murphy in Bradford and Liverpool. Australasian Catholic Record, The 90 (3):283.
    Harrison, Helen Adelaide's first bishop, Francis Murphy, was baptised in Navan, County Meath, Ireland, on 24 May 1795. His parents were Arthur Murphy and Bridget nee Flood. Baptismal records suggest his siblings included John Joseph, Arthur, Catherine, John Joseph Michael and Christopher. It is unlikely that all of these survived for long because by the time Francis Murphy was Bishop of Adelaide, he was writing to 'my sister' and 'my brother'.
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  9.  34
    Jeffrey L. Bradford & Dennis E. Garrett (1995). The Effectiveness of Corporate Communicative Responses to Accusations of Unethical Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 14 (11):875 - 892.
    When corporations are accused of unethical behaviour by external actors, executives from those organizations are usually compelled to offer communicative responses to defend their corporate image. To demonstrate the effect that corporate executives'' communicative responses have on third parties'' perception of corporate image, we present the Corporate Communicative Response Model in this paper. Of the five potential communicative responses contained in this model (no response, denial, excuse, justification, and concession), results from our empirical test demonstrate that a concession is the (...)
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  10.  10
    Dennis E. Garrett, Jeffrey L. Bradford, Renee A. Meyers & Joy Becker (1989). Issues Management and Organizational Accounts: An Analysis of Corporate Responses to Accusations of Unethical Business Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (7):507 - 520.
    When external groups accuse a business organization of unethical practices, managers of the accused organization usually offer a communicative response to attempt to protect their organization's public image. Even though many researchers readily concur that analysis of these communicative responses is important to our understanding of business and society conflict, few investigations have focused on developing a theoretical framework for analyzing these communicative strategies used by managers. In addition, research in this area has suffered from a lack of empirical investigation. (...)
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  11.  5
    Simon Bradford (2007). The 'Good Youth Leader': Constructions of Professionalism in English Youth Work, 1939-45. Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (3):293-309.
    This article explores the development of professional training for youth leaders (now, youth workers) in England and Wales between 1939 and 1945. The article identifies the state's construction of young people as a problematic social category at a time of national crisis and its mobilization of youth leadership as part of the war effort. The Board of Education supported, sometimes tacitly, the development of courses in some universities and voluntary organizations for youth leaders. By 1942 full-time courses of training existed (...)
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  12.  47
    William C. Bradford (2006). Acknowledging and Rectifying the Genocide of American Indians: "Why is It That They Carry Their Lives on Their Fingernails?". Metaphilosophy 37 (3-4):515–543.
  13.  29
    Kevin D. Bradford & Debra M. Desrochers (2009). The Use of Scents to Influence Consumers: The Sense of Using Scents to Make Cents. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):141 - 153.
    Since the sense of smell cannot be turned off and it prompts immediate, emotional responses, marketers are becoming aware of its usefulness in communicating with consumers. Consequently, over the last few years consumers have been increasingly influenced by ambient scents, which are defined as general odors that do not emanate from a product but are present as part of the retail environment. The goal of this article is to create awareness of the ethical issues in the scent marketing industry. In (...)
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  14.  13
    Craig A. Cunningham David Granger Jane Fowler Morse Barbara Stengel Terri Wilson (2007). Dewey, Women, and Weirdoes: Or, the Potential Rewards for Scholars Who Dialogue Across Difference. Education and Culture 23 (2):pp. 27-62.
    This symposium provides five case studies of the ways that John Dewey's philosophy and practice were influenced by women or "weirdoes" (our choices include F. M. Alexander, Albert Barnes, Helen Bradford Thompson, Elsie Ripley Clapp, and Jane Addams) and presents some conclusions about the value of dialoging across difference for philosophers and other scholars.
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  15.  7
    Judith Bradford (1998). Ralph Ellis, Eros in a Narcissistic Culture: An Analysis Anchored in the Life-World. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (3):433-438.
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  16.  4
    Dennis E. Bradford & Walter Watson (1982). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 16 (3):239-245.
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  17. M. G. Bradford (1977). Human Geography: Theories and Their Applications. Oxford University Press.
     
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  18. Gamaliel Bradford (1928/1968). Life and I. New York, Greenwood Press.
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  19. John J. Prendergast & G. Kenneth Bradford (eds.) (2007). Listening From the Heart of Silence. Paragon House.
     
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  20.  92
    Uwe Steinhoff (2013). Helen Frowe’s “Practical Account of Self-Defence”: A Critique. Public Reason 5 (1):87-96.
    Helen Frowe has recently offered what she calls a “practical” account of self-defense. Her account is supposed to be practical by being subjectivist about permissibility and objectivist about liability. I shall argue here that Frowe first makes up a problem that does not exist and then fails to solve it. To wit, her claim that objectivist accounts of permissibility cannot be action-guiding is wrong; and her own account of permissibility actually retains an objectivist (in the relevant sense) element. (...)
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  21. William J. Rapaport (2006). How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape From a Chinese Room. Minds and Machines 16 (4):381-436.
    A computer can come to understand natural language the same way Helen Keller did: by using “syntactic semantics”—a theory of how syntax can suffice for semantics, i.e., how semantics for natural language can be provided by means of computational symbol manipulation. This essay considers real-life approximations of Chinese Rooms, focusing on Helen Keller’s experiences growing up deaf and blind, locked in a sort of Chinese Room yet learning how to communicate with the outside world. Using the (...)
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  22.  58
    William J. Rapaport (2006). How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape From a Chinese Room. Minds and Machines 16 (4):381-436.
    A computer can come to understand natural language the same way Helen Keller did: by using “syntactic semantics”—a theory of how syntax can suffice for semantics, i.e., how semantics for natural language can be provided by means of computational symbol manipulation. This essay considers real-life approximations of Chinese Rooms, focusing on Helen Keller ’s experiences growing up deaf and blind, locked in a sort of Chinese Room yet learning how to communicate with the outside world. Using (...)
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  23.  37
    Jason Ford (2011). Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room. Minds and Machines 21 (1):57-72.
    William Rapaport, in “How Helen Keller used syntactic semantics to escape from a Chinese Room,” (Rapaport 2006), argues that Helen Keller was in a sort of Chinese Room, and that her subsequent development of natural language fluency illustrates the flaws in Searle’s famous Chinese Room Argument and provides a method for developing computers that have genuine semantics (and intentionality). I contend that his argument fails. In setting the problem, Rapaport uses his own preferred definitions of semantics (...)
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  24. Adolf Meyer, Rand B. Evans, Ruth Leys & Edward Bradford Titchener (1990). Defining American Psychology the Correspondence Between Adolf Meyer and Edward Bradford Titchener. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  25.  8
    Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie (2007). Inbreeding, Eugenics, and Helen Dean King (1869-1955). Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):467 - 507.
    Helen Dean King's scientific work focused on inbreeding using experimental data collected from standardized laboratory rats to elucidate problems in human heredity. The meticulous care with which she carried on her inbreeding experiments assured that her results were dependable and her theoretical explanations credible. By using her nearly homozygous rats as desired commodities, she also was granted access to venues and people otherwise unavailable to her as a woman. King's scientific career was made possible through her life experiences. She (...)
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  26. Margaret Graver (1995). Dog-Helen and Homeric Insult. Classical Antiquity 14 (1):41-61.
    Helen's self-disparagement is an anomaly in epic diction, and this is especially true of those instances where she refers to herself as "dog" and "dog-face." This essay attempts to show that Helen's dog-language, in that it remains in conflict with other features of her characterization, has some generic significance for epic, helping to establish the superiority of epic performance over competing performance types which treated her differently. The metaphoric use of χύων and its derivatives has not (...)
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  27.  32
    Zbigniew Nerczuk (2012). "Pochwała Heleny" Gorgiasza Z Leontinoi (Gorgias' "Helen"). Studia Antyczne I Mediewistyczne 10:17-36.
    This is the introduction and the translation of Gorgias' "Helen". The speech is considered to be one of the most interesting pieces of early Greek rhetoric not only because of its rhetorical, but also because of its philosophical value. There is no doubt that it sets out the outlines of the sophistic conception of logos and (along with another Gorgias' speech Palamedes) represents the starting point for the Plato's critique of Gorgias' rhetoric in the dialogue "Gorgias'.
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  28. Helen E. Longino (1997). Feminist Epistemology as a Local Epistemology: Helen E. Longino. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):19–36.
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  29. William Rapaport (2011). Yes, She Was! Reply to Ford’s “Helen KellerWas Never in a Chinese Room”. Minds and Machines 21 (1):3-17.
    Ford’s Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room claims that my argument in How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape from a Chinese Room fails because Searle and I use the terms ‘syntax’ and ‘semantics’ differently, hence are at cross purposes. Ford has misunderstood me; this reply clarifies my theory.
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  30.  59
    J. Leech (2013). The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds, Edited by Helen Beebee and Nigel Sabbarton-Leary. Mind 122 (485):253-257.
    Book review of "The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds", edited by Helen Beebee and Nigel Sabbarton-Leary (Routledge, 2010).
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  31.  13
    Helen Steward (2014). Replies to Randolph Clarke, John Bishop, and Helen Beebee. Res Philosophica 91 (3):547-557.
    Contains the author's responses to comments by the three named authors on her book, 'A Metaphysics for Freedom'.
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  32.  58
    Michael Huemer (2004). Elusive Freedom? A Reply to Helen Beebee. Philosophical Review 113 (3):411-416.
    I defend my earlier argument for incompatibilism, against Helen Beebee’s reply. Beebee’s reply would allow one to have free will despite that nothing one does counts as an exercise of that freedom, and would grant one the ability to do A even when one’s doing A requires something to happen that one cannot bring about and that in fact will not happen.
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  33.  15
    Justin Leiber (1996). Helen Keller as Cognitive Scientist. Philosophical Psychology 9 (4):419 – 440.
    Nature's experiments in isolation—the wild boy of Aveyron, Genie, their name is hardly legion—are by their nature illusive. Helen Keller, blind and deaf from her 18th month and isolated from language until well into her sixth year, presents a unique case in that every stage in her development was carefully recorded and she herself, graduate of Radcliffe College and author of 14 books, gave several careful and insightful accounts of her linguistic development and her cognitive and sensory situation. (...)
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  34.  12
    Helen Beebee (2007). Humes Old and New: Peter Millican and Helen Beebee: The Two Definitions and the Doctrine of Necessity. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 107:413 - 431.
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  35. Derek Morgan (2001). The Bleak House of Surrogacy: Broidy V. St Helen's and Knowsley Health Authority. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 9 (1):57-67.
    This note examines the British case of Broidy v. St Helen's andKnowsley Health Authority in which Margaret Broidy was unsuccessful in anegligence action against the defendant Health Authority following an emergency caesareanoperation in which a hysterectomy had been performed as `essential'. Of particularfeminist interest is the fact that Broidy's claim for, inter alia, the costs of asurrogacy arrangement to be carried out in California was refused on the basis that it wasnot reasonable – the chances of success of (...)
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  36.  6
    Ruby Blondell (2010). Refractions of Homer's Helen in Archaic Lyric. American Journal of Philology 131 (3):349-391.
    Homer in general, and Helen in particular, were of great interest to the lyric poets. This article examines ways in which major fragments of Alcaeus, Ibycus, and Sappho select and combine aspects of the Iliadic Helen in order to pursue various poetic agendas, providing diverse perspectives on the complex issues of Helen's choice, agency, beauty, and eroticism. Since Helen, like Pandora, is a kalon kakon, it proves impossible to praise or blame her (...)
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  37.  3
    Leslie Ryan (2007). Art+ Ecology: Land Reclamation Works of Artists Robert Smithson, Robert Morris, and Helen Mayer Harrison and Newton Harrison. Environmental Philosophy 4 (1-2):95-116.
    Post-industrial landscapes present a challenge to traditional means of aesthetic evaluation. This article examines the work of four artists and their contributions to an aesthetic vocabulary that can support art practices that engage places and systems rather than objects. Art presumes a manipulation of materials and places, a significant point for landscape reclamation which also requires a re-making of a site. The land reclamation projects and proposals of Robert Smithson, Robert Morris, and Helen Mayer Harrison and Newton Harrison (...)
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  38.  12
    Edward H. Sisson, A Dialog Between a Senator and a Scientist on Themes of Government Power, Science, Faith, Morality, and the Origin and Evolution of Life: Helen Astartian.
    Plato, in his dialog Charmides, presents the question of how society can determine whether a person who claims superior expertise in a particular field of knowledge does, in fact, possess superior expertise. In the modern era, society tends to answer this question by funding institutions (universities) that award credentials to certain individuals, asserting that those individuals possess a particular expertise; and then other institutions (the journalistic media and government) are expected to defer to the credentials. When, however, the sequential reasoning (...)
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  39.  10
    Ilja Leonard Pfeijffer (2000). Shifting Helen: An Interpretation of Sappho, Fragment 16 (Voigt). Classical Quarterly 50 (01):1-.
    Denys Page, discussing this poem in his classic Sappho and Alcaeus, seemed unimpressed by its aesthetic merits. In his note on line 7 he says: ‘The sequence of thought might have been clearer.... It seems then inelegant to begin this parable, the point of which is that Helen found O Krλλιστον in her lover, by stating that she herself surpassed all mortals in this very quality’ . His interpretative essay phrases further objections. ‘In a phrase which rings dull (...)
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  40.  8
    Michael Lloyd (1984). The Helen Scene in Euripides' Troades. Classical Quarterly 34 (02):303-.
    Troades has often been thought to lack any coherent structure, and this has been variously attributed to its being the last play of the trilogy and to Euripides' overriding concern to impress the horrors of war upon his fellow Athenians. More recently, however, attention has been drawn to how the constant presence of Hecuba gives unity to the play and to how it is articulated by the striking entries of Cassandra, Andromache, and Helen. Cassandra and Andromache enter in (...)
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  41.  3
    Andrea Hurst (2003). Helen and Heidegger: Disabled Dasein, Language and Others. South African Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):98-112.
    Both Heidegger's Being and Time and Helen Keller's The Story of my Life address the problem of what it means for humans to be optimally human. In reading these texts together, I hope to show that Helen's life-story confirms Heidegger's existential analyses to some extent, but also, importantly, poses a challenge to them with respect to the interrelated issues of disability, language and others. Heidegger's hermeneutic explication of what it means to be human is intended to (...)
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  42.  1
    Guy Hedreen (1996). Image, Text, and Story in the Recovery of Helen. Classical Antiquity 15 (1):152-184.
    Ancient Greek visual representations of the recovery of Helen by Menelaos are generally thought to depend closely on two distinct poetic sources. This paper argues that this belief is untenable. The principal theoretical assumption underlying it, that there will always be a close fit between ancient Greek poetic and artistic representations of a given story, is not the only conceivable relationship between poetry and art in Archaic and Early Classical Greece. The empirical evidence advanced to support the belief, (...)
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  43.  5
    David Kovacs (1998). Euripides, Troades 1050: Was Helen Overweight? Classical Quarterly 48 (02):553-556.
    Menelaus' question in 1050 has puzzled interpreters. Why would Euripides put a joke at the end of this scene? It is true that of all the scenes in this play, the Helen scene is the only one that could admit a joke without terrible discomfort. And there is already humour in it. Hecuba employs scornful laughter and an amusing reductio ad absurdum in her arguments against Helen. So a joke here is not as utterly ruinous as (...)
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  44.  3
    C. W. Willink (1989). The Reunion Duo In Euripides' Helen. Classical Quarterly 39 (01):45-.
    So begins one of the most engaging, and variously controversial, musical scenes in Euripides. The Messenger's narrative of the Phantom Helen's disappearance has proved to Menelaus that the Helen standing before him is the real Helen, altogether innocent of elopement to Troy, from whom he has been sundered for seventeen laborious years. The ensuing embrace is developed in a duet which is followed without a break by the so-called ‘Interrogation’ , the two together constituting (...)
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  45.  1
    Hilton Kelly (2012). “Just Something Gone, But Nothing Missing”: Booker T. Washington, Nannie Helen Burroughs, and the Social Significance of Black Teachers Theorizing Across Two Centuries. Educational Studies 48 (3):215-219.
    (2012). “Just Something Gone, But Nothing Missing”: Booker T. Washington, Nannie Helen Burroughs, and the Social Significance of Black Teachers Theorizing Across Two Centuries. Educational Studies: Vol. 48, Black Teachers Theorizing, pp. 215-219.
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  46.  3
    C. W. Willink (1990). The Parodos of Euripides' Helen (164–90). Classical Quarterly 40 (01):77-.
    The friendly expatriate ladies of the chorus in Helen enter having heard loud lamentation issuing from the palace, while engaged, like the Φλα of the chorus in Hippolytus 125ff., in spreading laundered crimson textiles to dry in the sun. The central theme of ‘hearing cries’, with the verb κλυον and nouns of utterance , is reminiscent also of Medea 131ff., where the opening words of the Parodos κλυον Φωνν, κλυον δ βον… allude to Medea's loud utterances сωθεν in (...)
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  47. David Black (2004). Helen Macfarlane: A Feminist, Revolutionary Journalist, and Philosopher in Mid-Nineteenth-Century England. Lexington Books.
    Helen Macfarlane, revolutionary social critic, feminist and Hegelian philosopher was the first English translator of Karl Marx and Fredrich Engel's theCommunist Manifesto. Her original translation is included in this edition. Marx publicly admired her as a rare and original thinker and journalist. This book recreates her intellectual and political world at a key turning point in European history.
     
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  48. Marcel Franciscono (1977). History, Textbooks, and Art: Reflections on a Half Century of Helen Gardner's "Art Through the Ages". Critical Inquiry 4 (2):285-297.
    Because of their basic level, textbooks show the assumptions and biases of art historians more clearly than does advanced, and therefore more restricted, scholarship. Textbooks are the rock, as it were, within which lie the strata of historical method. They bury, and so preserve for the good and ill of students , not so much individual historical data, which can be picked up or rejected rather easily, as those things which give the appearance of intellectual grasp to historical writing: its (...)
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  49. Charles Garton (1977). Euripides, Helen 1564. Classical Quarterly 27 (02):295-.
    The Messenger is relating how Menelaus and Helen escape from Egypt in a royal Egyptian ship, under pretext that they are going to carry out a ritual ‘sea burial’ of the supposedly drowned Menelaus. Helen's husband, whose identity was as yet unknown to the Egyptian crew, induced them to let his own shipwrecked crew come on board, and as the bull intended for sacrifice resisted being embarked he here cries to his men to manhandle it—in fact (...)
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  50. Andrei Dragos Giulea (2010). Bradford F. Hinze Şi Irfan A. Omar (Eds.), Heirs of Abraham. The Future of Muslim, Jewish, and Christian Relations. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (15):107-109.
    Bradford F. Hinze şi Irfan A. Omar (eds.), Heirs of Abraham. The Future of Muslim, Jewish, and Christian Relations Maryknoll, New York, 2005.
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