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  1. Helen E. Ross (2013). Foreshortening Affects Both Uphill and Downhill Slope Perception at Far Distances. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):563-564.
    Perceived slope varies with the viewing distance, and is consistent with the effects of foreshortening. Distant viewing makes uphill slopes appear steeper and downhill slopes flatter than does near viewing. These effects are obvious to skiers and climbers in mountainous country. They have also been measured in outdoor experiments with controlled viewing distances. There are many other sources of slope illusions.
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  2. Helen E. Ross (2003). Neurological Models of Size Scaling. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):425-425.
    Lehar argues that a simple Neuron Doctrine cannot explain perceptual phenomena such as size constancy but he fails to discuss existing, more complex neurological models. Size models that rely purely on scaling for distance are sparse, but several models are also concerned with other aspects of size perception such as geometrical illusions, relative size, adaptation, perceptual learning, and size discrimination.
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  3. Helen E. Ross (2001). Berkeley, Helmholtz, the Moon Illusion, and Two Visual Systems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):116-117.
    Berkeley and Helmholtz proposed different indirect mechanisms for size perception: Berkeley, that size was conditioned to various cues, independently of perceived distance; Helmholtz, that it was unconsciously calculated from angular size and perceived distance. The geometrical approach cannot explain size-distance paradoxes (e.g., moon illusion). The dorsal/ventral solution is dubious for close displays and untestable for far displays.
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  4. Helen E. Ross (1995). Weight and Mass as Psychophysical Attributes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):606-607.
    In terms of physics, mass is the fixed attribute of an object while weight varies with the accelerative force. Neither weight nor mass are simple sensory stimuli as both involve the integration of sensory and motor information with higher cognitive processes. Studies of apparent heaviness yield only vague information about sensorimotor mechanisms.
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  5. Helen E. Ross (1994). Active and Passive Head and Body Movements. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):329.
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  6. Helen E. Ross (1993). Unwarranted Popularity of a Power Function for Heaviness Estimates. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):159.
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