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Profile: Helen A Fielding (University of Western Ontario)
  1. Helen A. Fielding (2014). The Poetry of Habit: Beauvoir and Merleau-Ponty on Aging Embodiment. In Silvia Stoller (ed.), Simone de Beauvoir’s Philosophy of Age: Gender, Ethics. DeGruyter Publishers69-81.
    As people age their actions often become entrenched—we might say they are not open to the new; they are less able to adapt; they are stuck in a rut. Indeed, in The Coming of Age (La Vieillesse) Simone de Beauvoir writes that to be old is to be condemned neither to freedom nor to meaning, but rather to boredom (Beauvoir 1996, 461; 486). While in many ways a very pessimistic account of ageing, the text does provide promising moments where her (...)
     
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  2. Helen A. Fielding (2011). Multiple Moving Perceptions of the Real: Arendt, Merleau-Ponty, and Truitt. Hypatia 26 (3):518-534.
    This paper explores the ethical insights provided by Anne Truitt's minimalist sculptures, as viewed through the phenomenological lenses of Hannah Arendt's investigations into the co-constitution of reality and Maurice Merleau-Ponty's investigations into perception. Artworks in their material presence can lay out new ways of relating and perceiving. Truitt's works accomplish this task by revealing the interactive motion of our embodied relations and how material objects can actually help to ground our reality and hence human potentiality. Merleau-Ponty shows how our prereflective (...)
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  3. Helen A. Fielding (2011). Questioning “Homeland” Through Yael Bartana's Wild Seeds. In Christina Schües, Dorothea Olkowski & Helen Fielding (eds.), Time in Feminist Phenomenology. Indiana University Press. 149.
    Helen Fielding, in examining Yael Bartana’s video art works, in particular, Wild Seeds (2005), argues that politics seem to privilege the temporal, and video art thus lends itself to this enactment. Drawing upon Hannah Arendt, she concludes that the in-between, while a space and not a territory, is more a spacing, a taking place between people “no matter where they happen to be” than a place as such. In Bartana’s works, the temporal aspect of video allows her to open up (...)
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  4. Christina Schües, Dorothea Olkowski & Helen Fielding (eds.) (2011). Time in Feminist Phenomenology. Indiana University Press.
    The book, Time in Feminist Phenomenology, addresses a theme which has, for the most part, been neglected by various phenomenological, as well as feminist approaches. More specifically, although various rapprochements between feminism and phenomenology have examined different aspects of lived experience from the perspective of gender, comparatively little attention had been given to the exploration of time and temporality in relation to gender. The authors of this volume have thus taken on the task of rethinking the fundamental category of time (...)
     
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  5. Helen A. Fielding (2008). A Phenomenology of'The Other World': On Irigaray's' To Paint the Invisible'. Chiasmi International: Trilingual Studies Concerning Merleau-Ponty's Thought 9:518-534.
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  6. Helen A. Fielding (2008). Dwelling with Language : Irigaray Responds. In David Pettigrew & François Raffoul (eds.), French Interpretations of Heidegger: An Exceptional Reception. State University of New York Press.
    This chapter is a study on Luce Irigaray’s engagement with Martin Heidegger’s approach to language. Although language is central to both thinkers, rather than privileging language in terms of the poëtic event of being, the arising of something out of itself, Irigaray reveals how language is privileged in terms of its promise of dialogue between two who are different. This difference provides for a limit to what can be known or recognized, as well as for a creative potentiality that is (...)
     
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  7. Helen A. Fielding (2008). Irigaray : Dwelling with Language : Irigaray Responds. In David Pettigrew & François Raffoul (eds.), French Interpretations of Heidegger: An Exceptional Reception. State University of New York Press.
    This chapter is a study on Luce Irigaray’s engagement with Martin Heidegger’s approach to language. Although language is central to both thinkers, rather than privileging language in terms of the poëtic event of being, the arising of something out of itself, Irigaray reveals how language is privileged in terms of its promise of dialogue between two who are different. This difference provides for a limit to what can be known or recognized, as well as for a creative potentiality that is (...)
     
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  8. Helen A. Fielding (2007). A Phenomenology of “The Other World”. Chiasmi International 9:221-234.
  9. Helen A. Fielding (2007). Riassunto: Una fenomenologia dell' “altro mondo”. Chiasmi International 9:236-236.
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  10. Helen A. Fielding (2007). Résumé: Une phénoménologie de “l'autre monde”. Chiasmi International 9:235-235.
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  11. Helen Fielding, Hiltmann Gabrielle, Olkowski Dorothea & Reichold Anne (eds.) (2007). The Other: Feminist Reflections in Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The western philosophical tradition, with its focus on universal concepts and a presumed neuter, but ultimately male subject, has only relatively recently become open to the question of alterity, in particular the alterity of woman as the other of man. The essays of this volume reflect in particular on the ethical implications of taking the feminine other into account. This necessitates a rethinking of the implicit structures of Western philosophy which continue to exclude women as subjects who contribute to the (...)
     
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  12. Mauro Carbone & Helen A. Fielding (2005). Introduction. Chiasmi International 7:13-14.
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  13. Mauro Carbone & Helen A. Fielding (2005). Presentazione. Chiasmi International 7:15-16.
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  14. Mauro Carbone & Helen A. Fielding (2005). Présentation. Chiasmi International 7:11-12.
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  15. Helen A. Fielding (2004). Luce Irigaray, To Paint the Invisible, Translation and Interview. Continental Philosophy Review 37 (4):389-405.
    In this essay, which is preceded by an interview with the translator, Luce Irigaray revisits her earlier critique of Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s privileging of the visible, but also takes further her own thinking by drawing specifically on the issues raised within the context of painting and the creation of artworks. The focal point of her discussion is Merleau-Ponty’s essay on art, “Eye and Mind.”.
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  16. Helen Fielding (2003). Questioning Nature: Irigaray, Heidegger and the Potentiality of Matter. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 36 (1):1-26.
    Irigaray's insistence on sexual difference as the primary difference arises out of a phenomenological perception of nature. Drawing on Heidegger's insights into physis, she begins with his critique of the nature/culture binary. Both philosophers maintain that nature is not matter to be ordered by technical know-how; yet Irigaray reveals that although Heidegger distinguishes physis from techn in his work, his forgetting of the potentiality of matter, the maternal-feminine, and the two-fold essence of being as sexual difference means that his own (...)
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  17. Helen Fielding (2002). Merleau-Ponty's Last Vision: A Proposal for the Completion of 'The Visible and the Invisible' (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (1):134-135.
  18. Helen A. Fielding (2001). Only Blood Would Be More Red: Irigaray, Merlea-Ponty and the Ethics of Sexual Difference. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 32 (2):147-159.
    Irigaray turns to Merleau-Ponty's intuitions about the perception of color to develop her own insights into the creative emergence of sexuate identity. As a quality of the flesh, color cannot be reduced to formal codes. The privileging of word and text inherent to Western culture suppresses the coming into being of the embodied subject in his or her own situated context. Color, tied as it is to a corporeal creativity could provide an important link since it facilitates reflection, and a (...)
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  19. Helen A. Fielding (2001). The Finitude of Nature: Rethinking the Ethics of Biotechnology. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):327-334.
    In order to open new possibilities for bioethics, I argue that we need to rethink our concept of nature. The established cognitive framework determines in advance how new technologies will become visible. Indeed, in this dualistic approach of metaphysics, nature is posited as limitless, as material endowed with force which causes us to lose the sense of nature as arising out of itself, of having limits, an end. In contrast, drawing upon the example of the gender assignment and construction of (...)
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  20. Helen A. Fielding (2000). &Quot; The Sum of What She Is Saying&Quot;: Bringing Essentials Back to the Body. In Dorothea Olkowski (ed.), Resistance, Flight, Creation: Feminist Enactments of French Philosophy. Cornell University Press. 124.
    This chapter is an examination of the debate around essences in feminist philosophy and theorizing. Here, essences are rethought through Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology as carnal or embodied essences. As such, embodied essences are found at the joints, the hollows that are not inside us but that connect us, so that we are not isolated within cultural and historical zones. Embodied essences can be taken up in language as idealities.
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  21. Helen Fielding (1999). Depth of Embodiment. Philosophy Today 43 (1):73-85.
    Fielding discusses how Michel Foucault and Maurice Merleau-Ponty view spatial and temporal bodies. Foucault dismisses the understanding of an inside soul surrounded by a body.
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  22. Helen Fielding (1999). Lacan and Merleau-Ponty on Intersubjectivity. In Dorothea Olkowski James Morley (ed.), Merleau-Ponty, Interiority and Exteriority, Psychic Life and the World.
    This paper considers the relation between Merleau-Ponty and Lacan in terms of vision and intersubjectivity.
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  23. Helen A. Fielding (1998). Body Measures: Phenomenological Considerations of Corporeal Ethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (5):533 – 545.
    The development of bioethics primarily at the cognitive level further perpetuates the tendency to construe all aspects of our lives, including our bodies, as technical systems. For example, if we consider the moral issue of organ sales without taking our embodiment into account, there appear to be no sound arguments for opposing such sales. However, it is important to consider the aspects of the phenomenal body that challenge rational deliberation by exploring an embodied approach to the ethical dilemma produced by (...)
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  24. Helen Fielding (1996). Grounding Agency in Depth: The Implications of Merleau-Ponty's Thought for the Politics of Feminism. [REVIEW] Human Studies 19 (2):175-184.
    While poststructuralist feminist theorists have clarified our understanding of the gendered subject as produced through a matrix of language, culture, and psycho-sexual affects, they have found agency difficult to ground. I argue that this is because in these theories the body has served primarily as an inscribed surface. In response to this surface body, particular to this age, I have turned to Merleau-Ponty's concept of depth which allows us to theorize the agency crucial to feminist politics. While the poststructuralists' rejection (...)
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