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Profile: Helen Frowe (Stockholm University)
  1. Helen Frowe (forthcoming). Defensive Killing: An Essay on War and Self-Defence. OUP.
  2. Helen Frowe (forthcoming). Killing John to Save Mary: A Defence of the Distinction Between Killing and Letting Die. In J. Campbell, M. O’Rourke & H. Silverstein (eds.), Action, Ethics and Responsibility. MIT Press.
    Introduction This paper defends the moral significance of the distinction between killing and letting die. In the first part of the paper, I consider and reject Michael Tooley’s argument that initiating a causal process is morally equivalent to refraining from interfering in that process. The second part disputes Tooley’s suggestion it is merely external factors that make killing appear to be worse than letting die, when in reality the distinction is morally neutral. Tooley is mistaken to claim that we are (...)
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  3. Helen Frowe & Gerald Lang (eds.) (2014). How We Fight: Ethics in War. OUP.
  4. Helen Frowe (2013). Jeff McMahan, Killing In War. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (1):112-115.
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  5. Helen Frowe (2012). Self-Defence and the Principle of Non-Combatant Immunity. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):530-546.
    The reductivist view of war holds that the moral rules of killing in war can be reduced to the moral rules that govern killing between individuals. Noam Zohar objects to reductivism on the grounds that the account of individual self-defence that best supports the rules of war will inadvertently sanction terrorist killings of non-combatants. I argue that even an extended account of self-defence—that is, an account that permits killing at least some innocent people to save one's own life—can support a (...)
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  6. Helen Frowe (2011). The Ethics of War and Peace: An Introduction. Routledge.

    When is it right to go to war? When is a war illegal? What are the rules of engagement? What should happen when a war is over? How should we view terrorism?

    The Ethics of War and Peace is a fresh and contemporary introduction to one of the oldest but still most relevant ethical debates. It introduces students to contemporary Just War Theory in a stimulating and engaging way, perfect for those approaching the topic for the first time.

    Helen (...)

    • theories of self defence and national defence
    • Jus ad Bellum, Jus in Bello, and Jus post Bellum
    • the moral status of combatants
    • the principle of non-combatant immunity
    • the nature of terrorism and the moral status of terrorists.

    Each chapter concludes with a useful summary, discussion questions and suggestions for further reading, to aid student learning and revision. The Ethics of War and Peace is the ideal textbook for students studying philosophy, politics and international relations.

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  7. Helen Frowe (2010). A Practical Account of Self-Defence. Law and Philosophy 29 (3):245-272.
    I argue that any successful account of permissible self- defence must be action-guiding, or practical . It must be able to inform people’s deliberation about what they are permitted to do when faced with an apparent threat to their lives. I argue that this forces us to accept that a person can be permitted to use self-defence against Apparent Threats: characters whom a person reasonably, but mistakenly, believes threaten her life. I defend a hybrid account of self-defence that prioritises an (...)
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  8. Helen Frowe, Non-Combatant Liability in War.
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  9. Helen Frowe (2009). Civilian Immunity in War • by Igor Primoratz, Ed. Analysis 69 (2):394-395.
  10. Helen Frowe (2009). The Justified Infliction of Unjust Harm. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (3):345 - 351.
  11. Helen Frowe (2008). Equating Innocent Threats and Bystanders. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (4):277-290.
    abstract Michael Otsuka claims that it is impermissible to kill innocent threats because doing so is morally equivalent to killing bystanders. I show that Otsuka's argument conflates killing as a means with treating a person herself as a means. The killing of a person can be a means only if that person is instrumental in the threat to Victim's life. A permission to kill a person as a means will not permit killing bystanders. I also defend a permission to kill (...)
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  12. Helen Frowe (2008). Review of Larry May (Ed.), War: Essays in Political Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (11).
  13. Helen Frowe (2008). Threats, Bystanders and Obstructors. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1pt3):365-372.
    In this paper I argue that the widespread view that obstructors are a special sort of bystander is mistaken. Obstructors make Victim worse off by their presence, and thus are more properly described as innocent threats. Only those characters who do not make Victim worse off by their presence can be classified as bystanders.
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