Search results for 'Helen Gaylard' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Helen Gaylard & Allan Ramsay (2004). Relevant Answers to WH-Questions. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 13 (2):173-186.score: 240.0
    We consider two issues relating to WH-questions:(i) when you ask aWH-question you already have a description of the entity you are interested in,namely the description embodied in the question itself. You may evenhave very direct access to the entity – see (1) below.In general, what you want is an alternative description of some item thatyou already know a certain amount about.
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  2. C. A. Helen (2009). On Your Head Be It Sworn: Oath and Virtue in Euripides'Helen. Classical Quarterly 59:1-7.score: 180.0
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  3. Gerald Gaylard (2010). African Realism: The Reception and Transculturation of Western Literary Realism in Africa. Journal of Critical Realism 9 (3):276-298.score: 30.0
    A study of the reception and utilization of realism in literature outside of Europe during and after the nineteenth century, the area and period of its prominence, grants us some insight into how theories, practices and cultures travel and change in the process. In particular, it allows us to see how realism has been relativized in such a way as to open up the possibilities of redefinition of the notion and practice and moving beyond them. For these reasons I am (...)
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  4. M. Gaylard (1995). New Horizons in the Philosophy of Science. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (4):248-248.score: 30.0
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  5. William J. Rapaport (2006). How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape From a Chinese Room. Minds and Machines 16 (4):381-436.score: 24.0
    A computer can come to understand natural language the same way Helen Keller did: by using “syntactic semantics”—a theory of how syntax can suffice for semantics, i.e., how semantics for natural language can be provided by means of computational symbol manipulation. This essay considers real-life approximations of Chinese Rooms, focusing on Helen Keller’s experiences growing up deaf and blind, locked in a sort of Chinese Room yet learning how to communicate with the outside world. Using the SNePS computational (...)
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  6. Uwe Steinhoff (2013). Helen Frowe’s “Practical Account of Self-Defence”: A Critique. Public Reason 5 (1):87-96.score: 24.0
    Helen Frowe has recently offered what she calls a “practical” account of self-defense. Her account is supposed to be practical by being subjectivist about permissibility and objectivist about liability. I shall argue here that Frowe first makes up a problem that does not exist and then fails to solve it. To wit, her claim that objectivist accounts of permissibility cannot be action-guiding is wrong; and her own account of permissibility actually retains an objectivist (in the relevant sense) element. In (...)
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  7. Jason Ford (2011). Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room. Minds and Machines 21 (1):57-72.score: 24.0
    William Rapaport, in “How Helen Keller used syntactic semantics to escape from a Chinese Room,” (Rapaport 2006), argues that Helen Keller was in a sort of Chinese Room, and that her subsequent development of natural language fluency illustrates the flaws in Searle’s famous Chinese Room Argument and provides a method for developing computers that have genuine semantics (and intentionality). I contend that his argument fails. In setting the problem, Rapaport uses his own preferred definitions of semantics and syntax, (...)
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  8. Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie (2007). Inbreeding, Eugenics, and Helen Dean King (1869-1955). Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):467 - 507.score: 24.0
    Helen Dean King's scientific work focused on inbreeding using experimental data collected from standardized laboratory rats to elucidate problems in human heredity. The meticulous care with which she carried on her inbreeding experiments assured that her results were dependable and her theoretical explanations credible. By using her nearly homozygous rats as desired commodities, she also was granted access to venues and people otherwise unavailable to her as a woman. King's scientific career was made possible through her life experiences. She (...)
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  9. Helen E. Longino (1997). Feminist Epistemology as a Local Epistemology: Helen E. Longino. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):19–36.score: 18.0
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  10. William Rapaport (2011). Yes, She Was! Reply to Ford’s “Helen KellerWas Never in a Chinese Room”. Minds and Machines 21 (1):3-17.score: 18.0
    Ford’s <span class='Hi'>Helen</span> <span class='Hi'>Keller</span> Was Never in a Chinese Room claims that my argument in How <span class='Hi'>Helen</span> <span class='Hi'>Keller</span> Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape from a Chinese Room fails because Searle and I use the terms ‘syntax’ and ‘semantics’ differently, hence are at cross purposes. Ford has misunderstood me; this reply clarifies my theory.
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  11. Michael Huemer (2004). Elusive Freedom? A Reply to Helen Beebee. Philosophical Review 113 (3):411-416.score: 18.0
    I defend my earlier argument for incompatibilism, against Helen Beebee’s reply. Beebee’s reply would allow one to have free will despite that nothing one does counts as an exercise of that freedom, and would grant one the ability to do A even when one’s doing A requires something to happen that one cannot bring about and that in fact will not happen.
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  12. Edward H. Sisson, A Dialog Between a Senator and a Scientist on Themes of Government Power, Science, Faith, Morality, and the Origin and Evolution of Life: Helen Astartian.score: 18.0
    Plato, in his dialog Charmides, presents the question of how society can determine whether a person who claims superior expertise in a particular field of knowledge does, in fact, possess superior expertise. In the modern era, society tends to answer this question by funding institutions (universities) that award credentials to certain individuals, asserting that those individuals possess a particular expertise; and then other institutions (the journalistic media and government) are expected to defer to the credentials. When, however, the sequential reasoning (...)
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  13. Justin Leiber (1996). Helen Keller as Cognitive Scientist. Philosophical Psychology 9 (4):419 – 440.score: 18.0
    Nature's experiments in isolation—the wild boy of Aveyron, Genie, their name is hardly legion—are by their nature illusive. Helen Keller, blind and deaf from her 18th month and isolated from language until well into her sixth year, presents a unique case in that every stage in her development was carefully recorded and she herself, graduate of Radcliffe College and author of 14 books, gave several careful and insightful accounts of her linguistic development and her cognitive and sensory situation. (...)
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  14. Helen Beebee (2007). Humes Old and New: Peter Millican and Helen Beebee: The Two Definitions and the Doctrine of Necessity. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 107:413 - 431.score: 18.0
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  15. Andrea Hurst (2003). Helen and Heidegger: Disabled Dasein, Language and Others. South African Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):98-112.score: 18.0
    Both Heidegger's Being and Time and Helen Keller's The Story of my Life address the problem of what it means for humans to be optimally human. In reading these texts together, I hope to show that Helen's life-story confirms Heidegger's existential analyses to some extent, but also, importantly, poses a challenge to them with respect to the interrelated issues of disability, language and others. Heidegger's hermeneutic explication of what it means to be human is intended to uncover supposedly (...)
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  16. Hilton Kelly (2012). “Just Something Gone, But Nothing Missing”: Booker T. Washington, Nannie Helen Burroughs, and the Social Significance of Black Teachers Theorizing Across Two Centuries. Educational Studies 48 (3):215-219.score: 18.0
    (2012). “Just Something Gone, But Nothing Missing”: Booker T. Washington, Nannie Helen Burroughs, and the Social Significance of Black Teachers Theorizing Across Two Centuries. Educational Studies: Vol. 48, Black Teachers Theorizing, pp. 215-219.
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  17. Derek Morgan (2001). The Bleak House of Surrogacy: Broidy V. St Helen's and Knowsley Health Authority. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 9 (1):57-67.score: 18.0
    This note examines the British case of Broidy v. St Helen's andKnowsley Health Authority in which Margaret Broidy was unsuccessful in anegligence action against the defendant Health Authority following an emergency caesareanoperation in which a hysterectomy had been performed as `essential'. Of particularfeminist interest is the fact that Broidy's claim for, inter alia, the costs of asurrogacy arrangement to be carried out in California was refused on the basis that it wasnot reasonable – the chances of success of the (...)
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  18. Helene P. Foley (2006). Euripides' Escape-Tragedies: A Study of Helen, Andromeda, and Iphigenia Among the Taurians (Review). American Journal of Philology 127 (3):465-469.score: 16.0
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  19. K. H., Helene A. Kelleder & W. J. Greenstreet (1893). Helen Keller. Mind 2 (6):280-284.score: 16.0
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  20. R. H. K., De Helene A. Keller & W. J. Greenstreet (1893). Helen Keller. Mind 2 (6):280 - 284.score: 16.0
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  21. Jordi Cat (2012). Essay Review:Scientific Pluralism* Stephen H. Kellert , Helen E. Longino , and C. Kenneth Waters , Eds., Scientific Pluralism . Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 19. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press (2006), Xxix+248 Pp., $50.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 79 (2):317-325.score: 15.0
  22. Ned Hall (2001). Ontology of Mind. Helen Steward. Mind 110 (440):1123-1127.score: 15.0
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  23. Antony Eagle (2013). A Metaphysics For Freedom, by Helen Steward. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (4):833-833.score: 15.0
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  24. Philip Kitcher (2002). The Third Way: Reflections on Helen Longino's the Fate of Knowledge. Philosophy of Science 69 (4):549-559.score: 15.0
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  25. Rory J. Conces (2013). Review of Helen Sword's Stylish Academic Writing. [REVIEW] Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) Update (6):1-2.score: 15.0
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  26. P. J. E. Kail (2008). Review: Helen Beebee: Hume on Causation. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (466):451-456.score: 15.0
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  27. Philip Kitcher (2002). Reply to Helen Longino. Philosophy of Science 69 (4):569-572.score: 15.0
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  28. S. Law (2012). The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds Edited by Helen Beebee and Nigel Sabbarton-Leary. Analysis 72 (3):621-622.score: 15.0
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  29. Stéphanie Ruphy (2006). "Empiricism All the Way Down": A Defense of the Value-Neutrality of Science in Response to Helen Longino's Contextual Empiricism. Perspectives on Science 14 (2):189-214.score: 15.0
    : A central claim of Longino's contextual empiricism is that scientific inquiry, even when "properly conducted", lacks the capacity to screen out the influence of contextual values on its results. I'll show first that Longino's attack against the epistemic integrity of science suffers from fatal empirical weaknesses. Second I'll explain why Longino's practical proposition for suppressing biases in science, drawn from her contextual empiricism, is too demanding and, therefore, unable to serve its purpose. Finally, drawing on Bourdieu's sociological analysis of (...)
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  30. Steve Fuller (1993). Book Review:Science as Social Knowledge: Values and Objectivity in Scientific Inquiry Helen E. Longino. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 60 (2):360-.score: 15.0
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  31. W. Schmaus (1993). Book Reviews : Helen E. Longino, Science as Social Knowledge: Values and Objectivity in Scientific Inquiry. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 1990. Pp. Xii, 262, $35.00 (Cloth), $13.95 (Paper. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (4):562-566.score: 15.0
  32. Nicholas C. Rynearson (2013). Helen, Achilles and the Psuchê: Superlative Beauty and Value in the Iliad. Intertexts 17 (1-2):3-21.score: 15.0
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  33. J. Leech (2013). The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds, Edited by Helen Beebee and Nigel Sabbarton-Leary. Mind 122 (485):253-257.score: 15.0
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  34. David L. Hull (2008). Review of Stephen H. Kellert, Helen E. Longino, C. Kenneth Waters (Eds.), Scientific Pluralism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (5).score: 15.0
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  35. T. J. Kalikow (1978). Book Reviews : Civilized Man's Eight Deadly Sins. By Konrad Lorenz. Trans. Marjorie Kerr Wilson. A Helen and Kurt Wolff Book. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc., 1974. Pp. XIII + 107, $4.95. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 8 (1):99-101.score: 15.0
  36. H. C. Baldry (1968). Sophrosyne Helen North: Sophrosyne: Self-Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature. (Cornell Studies in Classical Philology, Xxxv.) Pp. Xx+391. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1966. Cloth, 80s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 18 (02):192-194.score: 15.0
  37. Daniel W. Graham (2001). The Order of Nature in Aristotle's Physics: Place and the Elements. Helen S. Lang. Mind 110 (440):1084-1087.score: 15.0
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  38. Harry G. Frankfurt (1959). Book Review:On Shame and the Search for Identity Helen Merrell Lynd. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 26 (1):51-.score: 15.0
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  39. Neil Levy (2013). Are We Agents at All? Helen Steward's Agency Incompatibilism. Inquiry 56 (4):1-14.score: 15.0
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  40. Gerard Magill (2007). Cooperation, Complicity & Conscience: Problems in Healthcare, Science, Law and Public Policy. Edited by Helen Watt. Heythrop Journal 48 (3):487–488.score: 15.0
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  41. Justina Gregory (2008). Parker (L.P.E.) (Ed.) Euripides' Alcestis. With Introduction and Commentary. Pp. Lxxxix + 307. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Cased, £70. ISBN: 978-0-19-925466-8. Burian (P.) (Ed., Trans.) Euripides: Helen. With Introduction, Translation and Commentary. Pp. X + 309. Oxford: Aris & Phillips, 2007. Paper, £18 (Cased, £40). ISBN: 978-0-85568-651-1 (978-0-85668-650-4 Hbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 58 (01):17-19.score: 15.0
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  42. David Archard (2009). The Long Life – Helen Small. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (236):568-570.score: 15.0
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  43. Richard Fumerton (2006). Review of Helen Beebee, Julian Dodd (Eds.), Truthmakers: The Contemporary Debate. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (3).score: 15.0
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  44. Mary B. Mahowald (1994). No Longer Patient: Feminist Ethics and Health Care, Susan Sherwin. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1992. 286 Pp.Feminist Perspectives in Medical Ethics, Helen Bequaert Holmes and Laura M. Purdy, Eds. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1992. 315 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (01):149-.score: 15.0
  45. Ilja Leonard Pfeijffer (2000). Shifting Helen: An Interpretation of Sappho, Fragment 16 (Voigt). Classical Quarterly 50 (01):1-.score: 15.0
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  46. Gail Schwab (2011). Sharing the World. By Luce Irigaray and Teaching. Edited by Luce Irigaray with Mary Green and Conversations by Luce Irigaray with Stephen Pluháček and Heidi Bostic, Judith Still, Michael Stone, Andrea Wheeler, Gillian Howie, Margaret R. Miles and Laine M. Harrington, Helen A. Fielding, Elizabeth Grosz, Michael Worton, and Birgitte H. Hidttun. [REVIEW] Metaphilosophy 42 (3):328-340.score: 15.0
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  47. Ada S. Jaarsma (2011). Kierkegaard, Metaphysics and Political Theory: Unfinished Selves. By Aliston Assiter . New York: Continuum, 2009. The Neither/Nor of the Second Sex: Kierkegaard on Women, Sexual Difference, and Sexual Relations. By CÉline LÉon . Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press, 2008. Irigaray and Kierkegaard: On the Construction of the Self. By Helen Tallon Russell . Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press, 2009. [REVIEW] Hypatia 27 (3):922-928.score: 15.0
  48. Jonathan Parry (2013). Helen Frowe. The Ethics of War and Peace: An Introduction (Abingdon: Routledge, 2011), 244 Pp. ISBN: 9780415492409 (Pbk.). Hardback/Paperback: £70.00/17.99. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (6):789-792.score: 15.0
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