11 found
Sort by:
  1. Helen Haste (2013). Deconstructing the Elephant and the Flag in the Lavatory: Promises and Problems of Moral Foundations Research. Journal of Moral Education 42 (3):316-329.
    Moral Foundations research offers rich promise, opening up key questions about how affect and cognition are integrated in moral response, and exploring how different moral discourses may supply meaning and valence to moral experience. Haidt and his colleagues also associate different discourses with different political positions. However I address three problematic areas. First to what extent Haidt has succeeded in transcending the traditional dichotomy of affect and cognition, and created an integrative model of how moral intuitions actually work. Second, the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Dwight Boyd, Yen-Hsin Chen, Brian Gates, J. Mark Halstead & Helen Haste (2011). Notes on Contributors and Acknowledgements. Journal of Moral Education 40 (3).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Helen Haste (2011). Discovering Commitment and Dialogue with Culture. Journal of Moral Education 40 (3):369-376.
    This paper presents an autobiographical narrative of two aspects of my history; two events that permeated my moral consciousness and influenced my political development and a sequence of changes in my dominant theoretical and epistemological perspectives. The two events were, as a teenager, the intense experience of briefly witnessing Apartheid culture and, as a young adult, becoming deeply engaged in feminist activism. My intellectual journey began in cognitive developmental theory and progressed to a cultural, discursive perspective in which the role (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Helen Haste (2009). Moral Minds: How Nature Designed Our Universal Sense of Right and Wrong. Journal of Moral Education 38 (3):380-382.
    (2009). Moral minds: how nature designed our universal sense of right and wrong. Journal of Moral Education: Vol. 38, No. 3, pp. 380-382. doi: 10.1080/03057240903101689.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Helen Haste & Salie Abrahams (2008). Morality, Culture and the Dialogic Self: Taking Cultural Pluralism Seriously. Journal of Moral Education 37 (3):377-394.
    This paper explores moral reasoning within the framework of contemporary cultural theory, in which moral functioning is action mediated by tools (such as socially available discourses) within a social and cultural context. This cultural model of a dialogic moral self challenges many of the assumptions inherent in the individualistic Kantian position that underlies much moral reasoning research. It provides a model for understanding cultural variation in ethical systems as well as the social context in which individual reasoning operates and develops. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Helen Haste (2007). Obituary. Journal of Moral Education 36 (4):543-546.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Helen Haste & Amy Hogan (2006). Beyond Conventional Civic Participation, Beyond the Moral‐Political Divide: Young People and Contemporary Debates About Citizenship. Journal of Moral Education 35 (4):473-493.
    In Western thought, the relationship between the moral and political domains has been dominated by a version of political philosophy which, based on the distinction between ?public? and ?private?, argues that the moral is different from the political. In parallel, and related to this, has been a delineation of the ?political? as concerned with structural aspects of representative democracy, privileging electoral behaviour in particular. We challenge this distinction on the basis that it is not useful for addressing the motivational dimensions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Roland Jackson, Fiona Barbagallo & Helen Haste (2005). Strengths of Public Dialogue on Science‐Related Issues. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (3):349-358.
    This essay describes the value and validity of public dialogue on science?related issues. We define what is meant by ?dialogue?, the context within which dialogue takes place in relation to science, and the purposes of dialogue. We introduce a model to describe and analyse the practice of dialogue, at different stages in the development of science, its applications and their consequences. Finally, we place the practice of dialogue on science?related issues in relation to the wider political process and draw out (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Helen Haste (1996). Communitarianism and the Social Construction of Morality. Journal of Moral Education 25 (1):47-55.
    Abstract The emergent message of ?Communitarianism? is challenging the tradition of liberal rationalism that has sustained much recent research in moral development. This is much more than a matter of values; behind these two positions are very different ways of thinking about psychological and social processes. Liberal rationalists come out of a strongly cognitive, individualistic psychological tradition, while communitarians speak in the language of hermeneutics and social constructionism. This distinction underpins the values that each position espouses, for values arise, I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Helen Haste & Jane Baddeley (1991). Moral Theory and Culture: The Case of Gender. In William M. Kurtines & Jacob L. Gewirtz (eds.), Handbook of Moral Behavior and Development. L. Erlbaum. 1--223.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Lindy Wingfield & Helen Haste (1987). Connectedness and Separateness: Cognitive Style or Moral Orientation? Journal of Moral Education 16 (3):214-225.
    Abstract This paper reports a study of ?connectedness? vs ?separateness? orientation in adolescents? reasoning on friendship, loyalty and understanding of political and social order. Conflict resolution in the connectedness orientation was found to focus on negotiation and an attempt to represent all points of view; in the separateness orientation the focus was on the advocacy of rules or codes of practice. There was a strong relationship between orientation and gender. The paper considers the implications of these findings for Gilligan's perspective (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation