Search results for 'Helen Keane' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  57
    Helen Keane (2004). Disorders of Desire: Addiction and Problems of Intimacy. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 25 (3):189-204.
    This essay investigates the tensions produced by the categorization of different forms of excessive desire under the singular model of addiction, and it challenges the increasing acceptance of addiction as an all-purpose explanation for unruly desires through a comparison of the different forms of disordered desire in sex addiction and alcoholism. Moreover, it argues for a broad understanding of addictive processes to undermine the normative and moralizing assumptions of addiction discourses. Refiguring addiction as a kind of intimacy is one way (...)
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  2.  5
    C. A. Helen (2009). On Your Head Be It Sworn: Oath and Virtue in Euripides'Helen. Classical Quarterly 59:1-7.
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  3.  1
    C. A. Helen (2009). On Your Head Be It Sworn: Oath and Virtue in Euripides'Helen. Classical Quarterly 59:1-7.
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  4. John B. Keane (ed.) (1984). Contradictions of the Welfare State. The MIT Press.
    Claus Offe is one of the leading social scientists working in Germany today, and his work, particularly on the welfare state, has been enormously influential both in Europe and the United States. Contradictions of the Welfare State is the first collection of Offe's essays to appear in a single volume in English, and it contains a selection of his most important recent work on the breakdown of the post-war settlement.The political writings in this book are primarily concerned with the origins (...)
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  5. Patrick J. Keane (2008). Emily Dickinson's Approving God: Divine Design and the Problem of Suffering. University of Missouri.
    As much a doubter as a believer, Emily Dickinson often expressed views about God in general—and God with respect to suffering in particular. In many of her poems, she contemplates the question posed by countless theologians and poets before her: how can one reconcile a benevolent deity with evil in the world? Examining Dickinson’s perspectives on the role played by a supposedly omnipotent and all-loving God in a world marked by violence and pain, Patrick Keane initially focuses on (...)
     
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  6.  5
    Susan M. Wolf, Frances P. Lawrenz, Charles A. Nelson, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Mildred K. Cho, Ellen Wright Clayton, Joel G. Fletcher, Michael K. Georgieff, Dale Hammerschmidt, Kathy Hudson, Judy Illes, Vivek Kapur, Moira A. Keane, Barbara A. Koenig, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Elizabeth G. McFarland, Jordan Paradise, Lisa S. Parker, Sharon F. Terry, Brian van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond (2008). Managing Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Analysis and Recommendations. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (2):219-248.
    No consensus yet exists on how to handle incidental fnd-ings in human subjects research. Yet empirical studies document IFs in a wide range of research studies, where IFs are fndings beyond the aims of the study that are of potential health or reproductive importance to the individual research participant. This paper reports recommendations of a two-year project group funded by NIH to study how to manage IFs in genetic and genomic research, as well as imaging research. We conclude that researchers (...)
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  7.  72
    Michael Keane (2008). The Ethical “Elephant” in the Death Penalty “Room”. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):45 – 50.
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  8.  14
    Kathy Lund Dean, Jeri Mullins Beggs & Timothy P. Keane (2010). Mid-Level Managers, Organizational Context, and (Un)Ethical Encounters. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):51–69.
    This article details day-to-day ethics issues facing MBAs who occupy entry-level and mid-level management positions and offers defined examples of the stressors these managers face. The study includes lower-level managers, essentially excluded from extant literature, and focuses on workplace behaviors both undertaken and observed. Results indicate that pressures from internal organization sources, and ambiguity in letter versus spirit of rules, account for over a third of the most frequent unethical situations encountered, and that most managers did not expect to face (...)
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  9.  16
    Janet E. Osterman, James Hopper, William J. Heran, Terence M. Keane & Bessel A. van der Kolk (2001). Awareness Under Anesthesia and the Development of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. General Hospital Psychiatry 23 (4):198-204.
  10. Niall Keane (2011). Interpreting Plato Phenomenologically: Relationality and Being in Heidegger's Sophist. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 41 (2):170-192.
  11.  4
    Kathleen S. Keane (2003). A Philosophy of Nursing Conference. Nursing Philosophy 4 (1):77-81.
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  12.  17
    Michael Keane (2010). The Opioid Emperor Has No Clothes. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (11):25-27.
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  13.  11
    Stephen Keane (1997). Imaginary Homelands: Notes on Heimat and Heimlich. Angelaki 2 (1):81 – 89.
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  14.  11
    John E. Keane (1999). Piggy and the Eternal City: Science Fiction as Testing Ground for New Management Theory. Emergence: Complexity and Organization 1 (4):20-42.
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  15.  11
    Michael Keane (2010). Public Health Interventions Need to Meet the Same Standards of Medical Ethics as Individual Health Interventions. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (3):36-38.
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  16.  8
    Brian P. Keane (2008). On Representing Objects with a Language of Sentience. Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):113 – 127.
    In his book A Theory of Sentience, Austen Clark argues that the content of sensory representations can be expressed as sentences constructed from a language of sentience. Such sentences specify that a determinate feature obtains in a particular space-time region, but the language's limited vocabulary prohibits the sentences from referring or attributing features to objects. In this paper, I show that this view is flawed in at least two ways. First, if sensation has the capacities that Clark and others attribute (...)
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  17.  2
    Michael Keane (2008). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “The Ethical 'Elephant' in the Death Penalty 'Room”'. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):5-6.
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  18.  6
    Niall Keane (2009). In Memoriam Franco Volpi (1952–2009). Research in Phenomenology 39 (3):327-330.
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  19.  6
    Mieke Verfaellie & M. M. Keane (1997). The Neural Basis of Aware and Unaware Forms of Memory. Seminars in Neurology 17:153-61.
  20.  3
    Moira A. Keane (2008). Institutional Review Board Approaches to the Incidental Findings Problem. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (2):352-355.
    Institutional Review Boards are confronted with new challenges in the face of expanding technologies while fulfll-ing their existing regulatory mandate to ensure that plans are in place to protect subjects and to inform them of risks and benefts of research participation. Existing regulations and guidance do not address the issue of incidental fndings , thus leaving awareness of the issue and the application of ethical principles to IRB judgment alone. In order to assure that researchers are aware of the potential (...)
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  21.  3
    Catherine Keane (2009). Lucilius (K.) Hass Lucilius Und der Beginn der Persönlichkeitsdichtung in Rom. (Hermes Einzelschriften 99.) Pp. 260. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2007. Paper, €53. ISBN: 978-3-515-09021-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):111-.
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  22.  2
    Catherine Keane (2006). Braund (S.M.) (Ed., Trans.) Juvenal and Persius . (Loeb Classical Library 91.) Pp. Xiv + 536. Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press, 2004. Cased, £14.50. ISBN: 0-674-99612-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (01):127-.
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  23.  21
    Philip S. Keane (2002). Catholicism and Health-Care Justice: Problems, Potential, and Solutions. Paulist Press.
    Reviews the basic Catholic moral principles that apply to health care, then uses them to assess three major current trends in the health care industry.
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  24. Jondi Keane (2009). Hyperconnectivity Through Deleuze : Indices of Affect. In Eugene W. Holland, Daniel W. Smith & Charles J. Stivale (eds.), Gilles Deleuze: Image and Text. Continuum
     
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  25. Uwe Steinhoff (2013). Helen Frowe’s “Practical Account of Self-Defence”: A Critique. Public Reason 5 (1):87-96.
    Helen Frowe has recently offered what she calls a “practical” account of self-defense. Her account is supposed to be practical by being subjectivist about permissibility and objectivist about liability. I shall argue here that Frowe first makes up a problem that does not exist and then fails to solve it. To wit, her claim that objectivist accounts of permissibility cannot be action-guiding is wrong; and her own account of permissibility actually retains an objectivist (in the relevant sense) element. In (...)
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  26. William J. Rapaport (2006). How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape From a Chinese Room. Minds and Machines 16 (4):381-436.
    A computer can come to understand natural language the same way Helen Keller did: by using “syntactic semantics”—a theory of how syntax can suffice for semantics, i.e., how semantics for natural language can be provided by means of computational symbol manipulation. This essay considers real-life approximations of Chinese Rooms, focusing on Helen Keller’s experiences growing up deaf and blind, locked in a sort of Chinese Room yet learning how to communicate with the outside world. Using the (...)
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  27.  67
    William J. Rapaport (2006). How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape From a Chinese Room. Minds and Machines 16 (4):381-436.
    A computer can come to understand natural language the same way Helen Keller did: by using “syntactic semantics”—a theory of how syntax can suffice for semantics, i.e., how semantics for natural language can be provided by means of computational symbol manipulation. This essay considers real-life approximations of Chinese Rooms, focusing on Helen Keller ’s experiences growing up deaf and blind, locked in a sort of Chinese Room yet learning how to communicate with the outside world. Using the (...)
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  28.  38
    Jason Ford (2011). Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room. Minds and Machines 21 (1):57-72.
    William Rapaport, in “How Helen Keller used syntactic semantics to escape from a Chinese Room,” (Rapaport 2006), argues that Helen Keller was in a sort of Chinese Room, and that her subsequent development of natural language fluency illustrates the flaws in Searle’s famous Chinese Room Argument and provides a method for developing computers that have genuine semantics (and intentionality). I contend that his argument fails. In setting the problem, Rapaport uses his own preferred definitions of semantics and syntax, (...)
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  29.  8
    Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie (2007). Inbreeding, Eugenics, and Helen Dean King (1869-1955). Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):467 - 507.
    Helen Dean King's scientific work focused on inbreeding using experimental data collected from standardized laboratory rats to elucidate problems in human heredity. The meticulous care with which she carried on her inbreeding experiments assured that her results were dependable and her theoretical explanations credible. By using her nearly homozygous rats as desired commodities, she also was granted access to venues and people otherwise unavailable to her as a woman. King's scientific career was made possible through her life experiences. She (...)
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  30. Margaret Graver (1995). Dog-Helen and Homeric Insult. Classical Antiquity 14 (1):41-61.
    Helen's self-disparagement is an anomaly in epic diction, and this is especially true of those instances where she refers to herself as "dog" and "dog-face." This essay attempts to show that Helen's dog-language, in that it remains in conflict with other features of her characterization, has some generic significance for epic, helping to establish the superiority of epic performance over competing performance types which treated her differently. The metaphoric use of χύων and its derivatives has not been well (...)
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  31.  52
    Jaana Eigi (2015). On the Social Nature of Objectivity: Helen Longino and Justin Biddle. Theoria. An International Journal for Theory, History and Foundations of Science 30 (3):449-463.
    According to Helen Longino, objectivity is necessarily social as it depends on critical interactions in com- munity. Justin Biddle argues that Longino’s account presupposes individuals that are completely open to any criticism; as such individuals are in principle able to criticise their beliefs on their own, Longino’s account is not really social. In the first part of my paper I argue that even for (...)
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  32.  79
    Peter Murphy (1990). Reviews : John Keane (Ed.), Civil Society and the State (Verso, 1988); Democracy and Civil Society (Verso, 1988). Thesis Eleven 26 (1):160-167.
    Reviews : John Keane , Civil Society and the State ; Democracy and Civil Society.
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  33. Kevin McDonald (1990). Reviews : John Keane, Public Life and Late Capitalism: Toward a Socialist Theory of Democracy (Cambridge, 1984); John Keane and John Owens, After Full Employment (Hutchinson, 1986). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 26 (1):167-172.
    Reviews : John Keane, Public Life and Late Capitalism: Toward a Socialist Theory of Democracy ; John Keane and John Owens, After Full Employment.
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  34. William Rapaport (2011). Yes, She Was! Reply to Ford’s “Helen KellerWas Never in a Chinese Room”. Minds and Machines 21 (1):3-17.
    Ford’s Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room claims that my argument in How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape from a Chinese Room fails because Searle and I use the terms ‘syntax’ and ‘semantics’ differently, hence are at cross purposes. Ford has misunderstood me; this reply clarifies my theory.
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  35. Helen E. Longino (1997). Feminist Epistemology as a Local Epistemology: Helen E. Longino. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):19–36.
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  36.  32
    Zbigniew Nerczuk (2012). "Pochwała Heleny" Gorgiasza Z Leontinoi (Gorgias' "Helen"). Studia Antyczne I Mediewistyczne 10:17-36.
    This is the introduction and the translation of Gorgias' "Helen". The speech is considered to be one of the most interesting pieces of early Greek rhetoric not only because of its rhetorical, but also because of its philosophical value. There is no doubt that it sets out the outlines of the sophistic conception of logos and (along with another Gorgias' speech Palamedes) represents the starting point for the Plato's critique of Gorgias' rhetoric in the dialogue "Gorgias'.
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  37.  19
    Helen Steward (2014). Replies to Randolph Clarke, John Bishop, and Helen Beebee. Res Philosophica 91 (3):547-557.
    Contains the author's responses to comments by the three named authors on her book, 'A Metaphysics for Freedom'.
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  38.  51
    Jaana Eigi (2012). Two Millian Arguments: Using Helen Longino’s Approach to Solve the Problems Philip Kitcher Targeted with His Argument on Freedom of Inquiry. Studia Philosophica Estonica 5 (1):44-63.
    Philip Kitcher argued that the freedom to pursue one's version of the good life is the main aim of Mill's argument for freedom of expression. According to Kitcher, in certain scientific fields, political and epistemological asymmetries bias research toward conclusions that threaten this most important freedom of underprivileged groups. Accordingly, Kitcher claimed that there are Millian grounds for limiting freedom of inquiry in these fields to protect the freedom (...)
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  39.  61
    J. Leech (2013). The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds, Edited by Helen Beebee and Nigel Sabbarton-Leary. Mind 122 (485):253-257.
    Book review of "The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds", edited by Helen Beebee and Nigel Sabbarton-Leary (Routledge, 2010).
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  40.  25
    Justin Leiber (1996). Helen Keller as Cognitive Scientist. Philosophical Psychology 9 (4):419 – 440.
    Nature's experiments in isolation—the wild boy of Aveyron, Genie, their name is hardly legion—are by their nature illusive. Helen Keller, blind and deaf from her 18th month and isolated from language until well into her sixth year, presents a unique case in that every stage in her development was carefully recorded and she herself, graduate of Radcliffe College and author of 14 books, gave several careful and insightful accounts of her linguistic development and her cognitive and sensory situation. Perhaps (...)
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  41.  58
    Michael Huemer (2004). Elusive Freedom? A Reply to Helen Beebee. Philosophical Review 113 (3):411-416.
    I defend my earlier argument for incompatibilism, against Helen Beebee’s reply. Beebee’s reply would allow one to have free will despite that nothing one does counts as an exercise of that freedom, and would grant one the ability to do A even when one’s doing A requires something to happen that one cannot bring about and that in fact will not happen.
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  42.  12
    Helen Beebee (2007). Humes Old and New: Peter Millican and Helen Beebee: The Two Definitions and the Doctrine of Necessity. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 107:413 - 431.
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  43.  10
    Ruby Blondell (2010). Refractions of Homer's Helen in Archaic Lyric. American Journal of Philology 131 (3):349-391.
    Homer in general, and Helen in particular, were of great interest to the lyric poets. This article examines ways in which major fragments of Alcaeus, Ibycus, and Sappho select and combine aspects of the Iliadic Helen in order to pursue various poetic agendas, providing diverse perspectives on the complex issues of Helen's choice, agency, beauty, and eroticism. Since Helen, like Pandora, is a kalon kakon, it proves impossible to praise or blame her unambiguously.
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  44.  3
    Nancy Worman (1997). The Body as Argument: Helen in Four Greek Texts. Classical Antiquity 16 (1):151-203.
    Certain Greek texts depict Helen in a manner that connects her elusive body with the elusive maneuvers of the persuasive story. Her too-mobile body signals in these texts the obscurity of agency in the seduction scene and serves as a device for tracking the dynamics of desire. In so doing this body propels poetic narrative and gives structure to persuasive argumentation. Although the female figure in traditional texts is always the object of male representation, in this study I examine (...)
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  45. Derek Morgan (2001). The Bleak House of Surrogacy: Broidy V. St Helen's and Knowsley Health Authority. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 9 (1):57-67.
    This note examines the British case of Broidy v. St Helen's andKnowsley Health Authority in which Margaret Broidy was unsuccessful in anegligence action against the defendant Health Authority following an emergency caesareanoperation in which a hysterectomy had been performed as `essential'. Of particularfeminist interest is the fact that Broidy's claim for, inter alia, the costs of asurrogacy arrangement to be carried out in California was refused on the basis that it wasnot reasonable – the chances of success of the (...)
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  46.  2
    Gary Meltzer (1994). "Where Is The Glory Of Troy?" "Kleos" In Euripides' "Helen". Classical Antiquity 13 (2):234-255.
    Near the end of Euripides' "Helen", Helen reportedly exhorts the Greek troops to rescue her Egyptian foes: "Where is the glory of Troy ? Show it to these barbarians" . Helen's rallying cry serves as a point of departure for investigating the nature and status of kleos in a play which invites reframing her question: Where, indeed, is the glory of Troy if the report of Helen's abduction by Paris is untrue? The drama deconstructs the notion (...)
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  47.  3
    Guy Hedreen (1996). Image, Text, and Story in the Recovery of Helen. Classical Antiquity 15 (1):152-184.
    Ancient Greek visual representations of the recovery of Helen by Menelaos are generally thought to depend closely on two distinct poetic sources. This paper argues that this belief is untenable. The principal theoretical assumption underlying it, that there will always be a close fit between ancient Greek poetic and artistic representations of a given story, is not the only conceivable relationship between poetry and art in Archaic and Early Classical Greece. The empirical evidence advanced to support the belief, the (...)
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  48.  7
    Andrea Hurst (2003). Helen and Heidegger: Disabled Dasein, Language and Others. South African Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):98-112.
    Both Heidegger's Being and Time and Helen Keller's The Story of my Life address the problem of what it means for humans to be optimally human. In reading these texts together, I hope to show that Helen's life-story confirms Heidegger's existential analyses to some extent, but also, importantly, poses a challenge to them with respect to the interrelated issues of disability, language and others. Heidegger's hermeneutic explication of what it means to be human is intended to uncover supposedly (...)
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  49.  12
    Edward H. Sisson, A Dialog Between a Senator and a Scientist on Themes of Government Power, Science, Faith, Morality, and the Origin and Evolution of Life: Helen Astartian.
    Plato, in his dialog Charmides, presents the question of how society can determine whether a person who claims superior expertise in a particular field of knowledge does, in fact, possess superior expertise. In the modern era, society tends to answer this question by funding institutions (universities) that award credentials to certain individuals, asserting that those individuals possess a particular expertise; and then other institutions (the journalistic media and government) are expected to defer to the credentials. When, however, the sequential reasoning (...)
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  50.  10
    Ilja Leonard Pfeijffer (2000). Shifting Helen: An Interpretation of Sappho, Fragment 16 (Voigt). Classical Quarterly 50 (01):1-.
    Denys Page, discussing this poem in his classic Sappho and Alcaeus, seemed unimpressed by its aesthetic merits. In his note on line 7 he says: ‘The sequence of thought might have been clearer.... It seems then inelegant to begin this parable, the point of which is that Helen found O Krλλιστον in her lover, by stating that she herself surpassed all mortals in this very quality’ . His interpretative essay phrases further objections. ‘In a phrase which rings dull in (...)
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