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Helen E. Longino [42]Helen Longino [13]
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Profile: Helen Longino (Stanford University)
  1. Stephen H. Kellert, Helen E. Longino & C. Kenneth Waters (forthcoming). Scientific Pluralism. Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
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  2. Helen E. Longino (2013). Data, Please. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (1):144-146.
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  3. Helen E. Longino (2013). Studying Human Behavior: How Scientists Investigate Aggression and Sexuality. University of Chicago Press.
    In Studying Human Behavior, Helen E. Longino enters into the complexities of human behavioral research, a domain still dominated by the age-old debate of “nature versus nurture.” Rather than supporting one side or another or attempting ...
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  4. Helen E. Longino (2013). The Social Life of Scientific Theories: A Case Study From Behavioral Sciences. [REVIEW] Biological Theory 7 (4):390-400.
    This article reports on the third phase of a comparative epistemological, ontological, and social analysis of a variety of approaches to investigating human behavior. In focusing on the fate of scientific ideas once they leave the context in which they were developed, I hope not only to show that their communication for a broader audience imposes a shape on their interrelations different than they seem to have in the research context, but also to suggest that a study comparing different approaches (...)
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  5. Helen Longino (2011). The Social Epistemology of Economic Experiments. Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (4):432-434.
    Journal of Economic Methodology, Volume 18, Issue 4, Page 432-434, December 2011.
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  6. Helen Longino (2011). What's So Great About an Objective Concept of Evidence? In Gregory J. Morgan (ed.), Philosophy of Science Matters: The Philosophy of Peter Achinstein. Oxford University Press. 124.
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  7. Helen Longino (2010). Feminist Epistemology at Hypatia's 25th Anniversary. Hypatia 25 (4):733-741.
    This essay surveys twenty-five years of feminist epistemology in the pages of Hypatia. Feminist contributions have addressed the affective dimensions of knowledge; the natures of justification, rationality, and the cognitive agent; and the nature of truth. They reflect thinking from both analytic and continental philosophical traditions and offer a rich tapestry of ideas from which to continue challenging tradition and forging analytical tools for the problems ahead.
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  8. Helen Longino (2009). Perilous Thoughts: Comment on Van Fraassen. Philosophical Studies 143 (1):25 - 32.
    Bas van Fraassen’s empiricist reading of Perrin’s achievement invites the question: whose doubts about atoms did Perrin put to rest? This comment recontextualizes the argument and applies the notion of empirical grounding to some contemporary work in behavioral biology.
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  9. Helen E. Longino (2009). Navigating the Social Turn in Philosophy of Science. Filozofia 64 (4):312-323.
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  10. Helen E. Longino (2009). Pornography, Oppression, and Freedom : A Closer Look. In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Ethics: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
     
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  11. Helen Longino, The Social Dimensions of Scientific Knowledge. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  12. Helen E. Longino (2008). Norms and Naturalism: Comments on Miriam Solomon's Social Empiricism. Perspectives on Science 16 (3):pp. 241-245.
    Miriam Solomon's social empiricism is marked by emphasis on community level rationality in science and the refusal to impose a distinction between the epistemic and the non-epistemic character of factors ("decision vectors") that incline scientists for or against a theory. While she attempts to derive some norms from the analysis of cases, her insistent naturalism undermines her effort to articulate norms for the (appropriate) distribution of decision vectors.
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  13. Stephen H. Kellert, Helen E. Longino & C. Kenneth Waters (2006). ¸ Itekellersetal:Sp.
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  14. Stephen H. Kellert, Helen E. Longino & C. Kenneth Waters (eds.) (2006). Scientific Pluralism Vol. 19. University of Minnesota Press.
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  15. Stephen H. Kellert, Helen E. Longino & C. Kenneth Waters (2006). The Pluralist Stance. In ¸ Itekellersetal:Sp.
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  16. Helen Longino (2005). Circles of Reason: Some Feminist Reflections on Reason and Rationality. Episteme 2 (1):79-88.
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  17. Helen E. Longino (2005). Complexity And Diversity All The Way. Metascience 14 (2):185-194.
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  18. Helen E. Longino (2005). Evidence in the Sciences of Behavior. In P. Achinstein (ed.), Scientific Evidence: Philosophical Theories & Applications. The Johns Hopkins University Press.
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  19. Helen E. Longino (2005). Whither Philosophy of Science? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (4):774-778.
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  20. Helen E. Longino (2004). How Values Can Be Good for Science. In Peter K. Machamer & Gereon Wolters (eds.), Science, Values, and Objectivity. University of Pittsburgh Press. 127--142.
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  21. Phillip E. Johnson, Thomas Kuhn, Abraham Lefkowitz, Henry Linville, John Locke, Helen Longino, Hermann Lotze, Arthur O. Lovejoy & Joseph Priestley (2002). Mead, George Herbert, 133,135,171 Mill, John Stuart, 55,188, 242. In F. Thomas Burke, D. Micah Hester & Robert B. Talisse (eds.), Dewey's Logical Theory: New Studies and Interpretations. Vanderbilt University Press.
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  22. Noretta Koertge, Philip Kitcher, Helen E. Longino, Eva Jablonka, Sungsu Kim, Branden Fitelson & Gábor Hofer‐Szabó (2002). 10. Discussion Note: Distributed Cognition in Epistemic Cultures Discussion Note: Distributed Cognition in Epistemic Cultures (Pp. 637-644). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 69 (4).
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  23. Helen Longino (2002). The Fate of Knowledge. Princeton University Press.
    "--Richard Grandy, Rice University "This is the first compelling diagnosis of what has gone awry in the raging 'science wars.
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  24. Helen E. Longino (2002). Marjorie Grene's Philosophical Naturalism. In R. E. Auxier & L. E. Hahn (eds.), The Philosophy of Marjorie Grene. La Salle, Illinois: Open Court. 29--83.
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  25. Helen E. Longino (2002). Reply to Philip Kitcher. Philosophy of Science 69 (4):573-577.
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  26. Helen E. Longino (2002). Science and the Common Good: Thoughts on Philip Kitcher's Science, Truth, and Democracy. Philosophy of Science 69 (4):560-568.
    In Science, Truth, and Democracy, Philip Kitcher develops the notion of well-ordered science: scientific inquiry whose research agenda and applications (but not methods) are subject to public control guided by democratic deliberation. Kitcher's primary departure from his earlier views involves rejecting the idea that there is any single standard of scientific significance. The context-dependence of scientific significance opens up many normative issues to philosophical investigation and to resolution through democratic processes. Although some readers will feel Kitcher has not moved (...)
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  27. Helen E. Longino (2001). What Do We Measure When We Measure Aggression? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (4):685-704.
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  28. Sally Gregory Kohlstedt & Helen E. Longino (1998). Edited Volumes-Women, Gender and Science. New Directions. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (3):382.
     
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  29. Helen E. Longino (1997). Alan Sokal's “Transgressing Boundaries. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 11 (2):119 – 120.
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  30. Helen E. Longino (1997). Comments on Science and Social Responsibility: A Role for Philosophy of Science? Philosophy of Science 64 (4):179.
    Each of the three papers offers a different model for the role philosophers of science might play in consideration of the relations of science to society. These comments address common themes in the three papers, articulate further questions for each, and suggest some historical shifts that require different forms of philosophical engagement now than in the early part of the century.
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  31. Helen E. Longino (1997). Feminist Epistemology as a Local Epistemology: Helen E. Longino. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):19–36.
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  32. Helen E. Longino (1997). Interpretation Versus Explanation in the Critique of Science. Science in Context 10 (1).
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  33. Evelyn Fox Keller & Helen E. Longino (eds.) (1996). Feminism and Science. Oxford University Press.
    (Series copy) The new Oxford Readings in Feminism series maps the dramatic influence of feminist theory on every branch of academic knowledge. Offering feminist perspectives on disciplines from history to science, each book assembles the most important articles written on its field in the last ten to fifteen years. Old stereotypes are challenged and traditional attitudes upset in these lively-- and sometimes controversial--volumes, all of which are edited by feminists prominent in their particular field. Comprehensive, accessible, and intellectually daring, the (...)
     
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  34. Helen E. Longino (1996). Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Values in Science: Rethinking the Dichotomy. In Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson (eds.), Feminism, Science, and the Philosophy of Science. 39--58.
    Underdetermination arguments support the conclusion that no amount of empirical data can uniquely determine theory choice. The full content of a theory outreaches those elements of it (the observational elements) that can be shown to be true (or in agreement with actual observations).2 A number of strategies have been developed to minimize the threat such arguments pose to our aspirations to scientific knowledge. I want to focus on one such strategy: the invocation of additional criteria drawn from a pool of (...)
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  35. Helen E. Longino (1995). Discovering Complexity. Teaching Philosophy 18 (1):80-83.
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  36. Helen E. Longino (1995). Gender, Politics, and the Theoretical Virtues. Synthese 104 (3):383 - 397.
    Traits like simplicity and explanatory power have traditionally been treated as values internal to the sciences, constitutive rather than contextual. As such they are cognitive virtues. This essay contrasts a traditional set of such virtues with a set of alternative virtues drawn from feminist writings about the sciences. In certain theoretical contexts, the only reasons for preferring a traditional or an alternative virtue are socio-political. This undermines the notion that the traditional virtues can be considered purely cognitive.
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  37. Helen Longino (1994). The Fate of Knowledge in Social Theories of Science. In Frederick F. Schmitt (ed.), Socializing Epistemology: The Social Dimensions of Knowledge. Rowman and Littlefield. 135--158.
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  38. Helen E. Longino (1994). Gender, Sexuality Research, and the Flight From Complexity. Metaphilosophy 25 (4):285-292.
  39. Helen E. Longino (1994). In Search Of Feminist Epistemology. The Monist 77 (4):472-485.
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  40. Helen E. Longino (1994). What Can She Know? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (2):495-496.
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  41. Helen Longino (1992). Hard, Soft, or Satisfying. Social Epistemology 6 (3):281 – 287.
  42. Helen E. Longino (1992). Knowledge, Bodies, and Values: Reproductive Technologies and Their Scientific Context. Inquiry 35 (3 & 4):323 – 340.
    This essay sets human reproductive technologies in the context of biological research exploiting the discovery of the structure of the DNA molecule in the early 1950s. By setting these technological developments in this research context and then setting the research in the framework of a philosophical analysis of the role of social values in scientific inquiry, it is possible to develop a perspective on these technologies and the aspirations they represent that is relevant to the concerns of their social critics.
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  43. Helen E. Longino (1992). Taking Gender Seriously in Philosophy of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:333 - 340.
    Using the author's social analysis of scientific knowledge, two ways of understanding the importance of gender to the philosophy of science are offered. Given a requirement of openness to multiple critical perspectives, the gender, race and class structure of a scientific community are an important ingredient of its epistemic reliability. Secondly, one can ask whether a gender sensitive scientific community might prefer certain evaluative criteria (or virtues of theory or practice) to others. Six such criteria (several of which are at (...)
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  44. Helen E. Longino (1991). Multiplying Subjects and the Diffusion of Power. Journal of Philosophy 88 (11):666-674.
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  45. Helen E. Longino (1990). Feminism and Philosophy of Science. Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (2-3):150-159.
  46. Helen E. Longino (1990). Science as Social Knowledge: Values and Objectivity in Scientific Inquiry. Princeton University Press.
    This is an important book precisely because there is none other quite like it.
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  47. Helen E. Longino (1989). Biological Effects of Low Level Radiation: Values, Dose-Response Models, Risk Estimates. Synthese 81 (3):391 - 404.
    Predictions about the health risks of low level radiation combine two sorts of measures. One estimates the amount and kinds of radiation released into the environment, and the other estimates the adverse health effects. A new field called health physics integrates and applies nuclear physics to cytology to supply both these estimates. It does so by first determining the kinds of effects different types of radiation produce in biological organisms, and second, by monitoring the extent of these effects produced by (...)
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  48. Helen E. Longino (1987). Can There Be A Feminist Science? Hypatia 2 (3):51 - 64.
    This paper explores a number of recent proposals regarding "feminist science" and rejects a content-based approach in favor of a process-based approach to characterizing feminist science. Philosophy of science can yield models of scientific reasoning that illuminate the interaction between cultural values and ideology and scientific inquiry. While we can use these models to expose masculine and other forms of bias, we can also use them to defend the introduction of assumptions grounded in feminist political values.
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  49. Mary Rorty, Claudia Card, Elizabeth Eames, Virginia Held, Helen Longino, Susan Mattingly, Susan Salladay, Avrum Stroll & Joyce Trebilcot (1987). Special Report: Women in Philosophy. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 60 (4):681 - 698.
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  50. Helen E. Longino (1986). What's Really Wrong with Quantitative Risk Assessment? PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:376 - 383.
    Quantitative risk assessment suffers from a variety of problems--some internal and others external. Dale Hattis proposes that the problems of risk assessment can be cured by the development of risk assessment theory. I agree that theory can help address some of the internal problems, such as the failure to date to take the interaction of hazardous substances with other substances in the environment into account. I argue that the external problems such as the manipulation of inherent uncertainties by the politically (...)
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