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  1. Helen Watt (2012). Cooperation and Immoral Laws. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 12 (2):241-248.
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  2. Helen Watt (2011). Bodily Invasions. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 11 (1):49-51.
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  3. Helen Watt (2004). Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: Choosing the “Good Enough” Child. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 12 (1):51-60.
    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) raises serious moral questions concerning the parent-child relationship. Good parents accept their children unconditionally: they do not reject/attack them because they do not have the features they want. There is nothing wrong with treating a child as someone who can help promote some other worthwhile end, providing the child is also respected as an end in him or herself. However, if the child's presence is not valued in itself, regardless of any further benefits it brings, the (...)
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  4. Helen Watt (2001). A Brief Defense of Frozen Embryo Adoption. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 1 (2):151-154.
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  5. Helen Watt (2001). Decisions Relating to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Commentary 3: Degrading Lives? Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):321-323.
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  6. Helen Watt (2000). Life and Death in Health Care Ethics: A Short Introduction. Routledge.
    In a world of rapid technological advances, the moral issues raised by life and death choices in healthcare remain obscure. Life and Death in Healthcare Ethics provides a concise, thoughtful and extremely accessible guide to these moral issues. Helen Watt examines, using real-life cases, the range of choices taken by healthcare professionals, patients and clients which lead to the shortening of life. The topics looked at include: euthanasia and withdrawal of treatment; the persistent vegetative state; abortion; IVF and cloning; and (...)
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  7. Helen Watt (1999). Response to “Germ Line Therapy to Cure Mitochondrial Disease: Protocol and Ethics of In Vitro Ovum Nuclear Transplantation” by Donald S. Rubenstein, David C. Thomasma, Eric A. Schon, and Michael J. Zinaman (CQ Vol. 4, No. 3). [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (01):88-96.
    Germ-line therapy has long been regarded with great caution both by scientists and by ethicists. Even those who do not reject germ-line therapy in principle have tended to reject it in practice as carrying unacceptable risks in our current state of knowledge. For this reason, a recent paper by Rubenstein, Thomasma, Shon, and Zinaman is unusual in putting forward a serious proposal for the use of germ-line therapy in the foreseeable future.
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  8. Helen Watt (1999). Germ-Line Therapy for Mitochondrial Disease: Some Ethical Objections. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: Cq: The International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees 8 (1):88.
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  9. Helen Watt (1998). Ethics in Reproductive and Perinatal Medicine. International Philosophical Quarterly 38 (1):88-89.
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  10. Helen Watt (1989). Singer on Abortion: A Utilitarian Critique. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67 (2):227 – 229.
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