Search results for 'Helene Dwyer Poland' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    Helene Dwyer Poland (1990). The Call of Stories. Teaching Philosophy 13 (1):75-76.
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  2.  1
    Abe Oudshoorn, Catherine Ward-Griffin, Cheryl Forchuk, Helene Berman & Blake Poland (2013). Client-Provider Relationships in a Community Health Clinic for People Who Are Experiencing Homelessness. Nursing Inquiry 20 (4):317-328.
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  3.  59
    Jeffrey Stephen Poland (1994). Physicalism, the Philosophical Foundations. Oxford University Press.
    Physicalism is a program for building a unified system of knowledge about the world on the basis of the view that everything is a manifestation of the physical aspects of existence. Jeffrey Poland presents a systematic and comprehensive exploration of the philosophical foundations of this program. He investigates the core ideas, motivating values, and presuppositions of physicalism; the constraints upon an adequate formulation of physicalist doctrine; the epistemological and modal status, the scope, and the methodological roles of physicalist (...)
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  4.  8
    William Dwyer (2001). Do Knowledge, Ethics, and Liberty Require Free Will? [REVIEW] Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 3 (1):83 - 108.
    William Dwyer reviews Initiative: Human Agency and Society, in which Tibor Machan argues that free will is a prerequisite for knowledge, ethics, and political liberty. Machan criticizes Hayek, Stigler, and "public choice" economics for their economic determinism and for discounting the importance of abstract ideas. Despite making a good case against environmental and economic determinism, Machan fails adequately to defend his central thesis that free will exists and that it is required for normative values.
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  5. William Dwyer (2002). Rejoinder to George Lyons and Tibor R. Machan: Free Will and Determinism. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 4 (1):221 - 230.
    William Dwyer responds to the comments of George Lyons and Tibor R. Machan on his review of Machan's Initiative (Journal of Ayn Rand Studies, Fall 2001). Dwyer reiterates points in his initial review, stressing the need to understand choice within a larger causal context.
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  6.  60
    Bryce Huebner, Susan Dwyer & Marc D. Hauser (2009). The Role of Emotion in Moral Psychology. Trends in Cognitive Science 13 (1):1-6.
    Recent work in the cognitive and neurobiological sciences indicates an important relationship between emotion and moral judgment. Based on this evidence, several researchers have argued that emotions are the source of our intuitive moral judgments. However, despite the richness of the correlational data between emotion and morality, we argue that the current neurological, behavioral, developmental and evolutionary evidence is insufficient to demonstrate that emotion is necessary for making moral judgments. We suggest instead, that the source of moral judgments lies in (...)
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  7. Susan Cartier Poland (1997). Landmark Legal Cases in Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (2):191-209.
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  8. Susan Dwyer (2009). Moral Dumbfounding and the Linguistic Analogy: Methodological Implications for the Study of Moral Judgment. Mind and Language 24 (3):274-296.
    The manifest dissociation between our capacity to make moral judgments and our ability to provide justifications for them, a phenomenon labeled Moral Dumbfounding, has important implications for the theory and practice of moral psychology. I articulate and develop the Linguistic Analogy as a robust alternative to existing sentimentalist models of moral judgment inspired by this phenomenon. The Linguistic Analogy motivates a crucial distinction between moral acceptability and moral permissibility judgments, and thereby calls into question prevailing methods used in the study (...)
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  9.  82
    Susan Dwyer, Bryce Huebner & Marc D. Hauser (2010). The Linguistic Analogy: Motivations, Results, and Speculations. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):486-510.
    Inspired by the success of generative linguistics and transformational grammar, proponents of the linguistic analogy (LA) in moral psychology hypothesize that careful attention to folk-moral judgments is likely to reveal a small set of implicit rules and structures responsible for the ubiquitous and apparently unbounded capacity for making moral judgments. As a theoretical hypothesis, LA thus requires a rich description of the computational structures that underlie mature moral judgments, an account of the acquisition and development of these structures, and an (...)
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  10. Jeffrey S. Poland & Barbara Von Eckardt (2004). Mechanism and Explanation in Cognitive Neuroscience. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):972-984.
    The aim of this paper is to examine the usefulness of the Machamer, Darden, and Craver (2000) mechanism approach to gaining an understanding of explanation in cognitive neuroscience. We argue that although the mechanism approach can capture many aspects of explanation in cognitive neuroscience, it cannot capture everything. In particular, it cannot completely capture all aspects of the content and significance of mental representations or the evaluative features constitutive of psychopathology.
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  11.  98
    Susan Dwyer (2006). How Good is the Linguistic Analogy? In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen P. Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind, Vol. 2: Culture and Cognition. Oxford University Press
    A nativist moral psychology, modeled on the successes of theoretical linguistics, provides the best framework for explaining the acquisition of moral capacities and the diversity of moral judgment across the species. After a brief presentation of a poverty of the moral stimulus argument, this chapter sketches a view according to which a so-called Universal Moral Grammar provides a set of parameterizable principles whose specific values are set by the child's environment, resulting in the acquisition of a moral idiolect. The principles (...)
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  12.  42
    James Dwyer (2009). How to Connect Bioethics and Environmental Ethics: Health, Sustainability, and Justice. Bioethics 23 (9):497-502.
    In this paper, I explore one way to bring bioethics and environmental ethics closer together. I focus on a question at the interface of health, sustainability, and justice: How well does a society promote health with the use of no more than a just share of environmental capacity? To address this question, I propose and discuss a mode of assessment that combines a measurement of population health, an estimate of environmental sustainability, and an assumption about what constitutes a fair (...)
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  13.  8
    Susan Dwyer (2008). Dupoux and Jacob's Moral Instincts: Throwing Out the Baby, the Bathwater and the Bathtub. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):1-2.
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  14.  82
    James Dwyer (2007). What's Wrong with the Global Migration of Health Care Professionals? Individual Rights and International Justice. Hastings Center Report 37 (5):36-43.
    : When health care workers migrate from poor countries to rich countries, they are exercising an important human right and helping rich countries fulfill obligations of social justice. They are also, however, creating problems of social justice in the countries they leave. Solving these problems requires balancing social needs against individual rights and studying the relationship of social justice to international justice.
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  15.  49
    D. P. Sulmasy, M. Dwyer & E. Marx (1996). Do the Ward Notes Reflect the Quality of End-of-Life Care? Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (6):344-348.
    OBJECTIVES: To study the accuracy of reviewing ward notes (chart review) as a measure of the quality of care rendered to patients with "Do Not Resuscitate" (DNR) orders. DESIGN: We reviewed the charts of 19 consecutive, competent inpatients with DNR orders for evidence that the staff addressed a broad range of patient care needs called Concurrent Care Concerns (CCCs), such as withholding treatments other than resuscitation itself, and attention to patient comfort needs. We then interviewed the patient, consultant physician, house (...)
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  16.  25
    Susan Dwyer (1999). Reconciliation for Realists. Ethics and International Affairs 13 (1):81–98.
    The rhetoric of reconciliation is common in situations where traditional judicial responses to past wrongdoing are unavailable because of corruption, large numbers of offenders, or anxiety about the political consequences. But what constitutes reconciliation?
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  17.  39
    Daniel J. Dwyer (2007). Husserl's Appropriation of the Psychological Concepts of Apperception and Attention. Husserl Studies 23 (2):83-118.
    In the sixth Logical Investigation, Husserl thematizes the surplus (Überschuß) of the perceptual intention whereby the intending goes beyond the partial givenness of a perceptual object to the object as a whole. This surplus is an apperceptive surplus that transcends the purely perceptual substance (Gehalt) or sensed content (empfundene Inhalt) available to a perceiver at any one time. This surplus can be described on the one hand as a synthetic link to future, possible, active experience; to intend an object is (...)
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  18. Philip Dwyer (1989). Freedom and Rule-Following in Wittgenstein and Sartre. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (September):49-68.
  19.  32
    Susan Dwyer & Paul M. Pietroski (1996). Believing in Language. Philosophy of Science 63 (3):338-373.
    We propose that the generalizations of linguistic theory serve to ascribe beliefs to humans. Ordinary speakers would explicitly (and sincerely) deny having these rather esoteric beliefs about language--e.g., the belief that an anaphor must be bound in its governing category. Such ascriptions can also seem problematic in light of certain theoretical considerations having to do with concept possession, revisability, and so on. Nonetheless, we argue that ordinary speakers believe the propositions expressed by certain sentences of linguistic theory, and that linguistics (...)
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  20.  62
    Philip Dwyer (ed.) (1990). Sense and Subjectivity: A Study of Wittgenstein and Merleau-Ponty. E.J. Brill.
    The philosophies of Merleau-Ponty and the later Wittgenstein are shown to yield a common position opposing 'realist' attempts to reduce appearance, sense, and ...
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  21.  19
    Susan Dwyer (2003). Moral Development and Moral Responsibility. The Monist 86 (2):181-199.
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  22. Susan Dwyer, Understanding the Problem of Abortion.
    Abortion raises a number of difficult questions for morality, law, and public policy. When, if ever, is abortion morally permissible? Do women have a legal right to abortion, and how is that right to be justified? Ought abortions for poor women be funded by the state? These questions are related in the sense that answers to any one of them have implications for answers to the others. But it is crucial to remember that they are different questions. For example, suppose (...)
     
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  23.  8
    J. Dwyer & D. F.-C. Tsai (2008). Developing the Duty to Treat: HIV, SARS, and the Next Epidemic. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (1):7-10.
    SARS, like HIV, placed healthcare workers at risk and raised issues about the duty to treat. But philosophical accounts of the duty to treat that were developed in the context of HIV did not adequately address some of the ethical issues raised by SARS. Since the next epidemic may be more like SARS than HIV, it is important to illuminate these issues. In this paper, we sketch a general account of the duty to treat that arose in response to HIV. (...)
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  24.  50
    James Dwyer (2009). When the Discharge Plan is Deportation: Hospitals, Immigrants, and Social Responsibility. Bioethics 23 (3):ii-iv.
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  25. Susan Dwyer, Pornography.
    Pornography has attracted a good deal of academic and political attention, primarily from feminists of various persuasions, moral philosophers, and legal scholars. Surprisingly less work has been forthcoming from film theorists, given how much pornography has been produced on video and DVD and is now available through live streaming video over the Internet. Indeed, it is not until 1989, with the publication of Linda Williams’ groundbreaking Hard Core, that pornography is distinguished, in terms of its content, intent, and governing conventions, (...)
     
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  26.  84
    Philip Dwyer (2010). Necessity and Possibility: The Logical Strategy of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (3):402-403.
    This book is a foray into the thorny interpretive issue of what to make of Kant's so-called "Metaphysical Deduction" of the categories. As with many of the arguments in the first Critique, the claim of the Metaphysical Deduction is easier to make out than its argument. The claim is that by some or other reference to "general logic," one may obtain a "transcendental logic," i.e., a justification (or "deduction") of the categories (of the understanding) necessary to the (very) possibility of (...)
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  27.  18
    Johanna Dwyer & Franklin M. Loew (1994). Nutritional Risks of Vegan Diets to Women and Children: Are They Preventable? [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 7 (1):87-109.
    The potential health risks of vegan diets specifically for women and children are discussed. Women and children are at higher risk of malnutrition from consumption of unsupplemented vegan diets than are adult males. Those who are very young, pregnant, lactating, elderly, or who suffer from poverty, disease or other environmentally induced disadvantages are at special risk. The size of these risks is difficult to quantify from existing studies. Fortunately the risk of dietary deficiency disease can be avoided and the potential (...)
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  28.  1
    James Dwyer (2003). Teaching Global Bioethics. Bioethics 17 (5-6):432-446.
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  29.  98
    Larry Dwyer (1975). Time Travel and Changing the Past. Philosophical Studies 27 (5):341 - 350.
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  30.  9
    John F. Dwyer (1956). Surprised by Joy. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):311-312.
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  31.  9
    John F. Dwyer (1946). The Great Divorce. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 21 (4):746-747.
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  32. Susan Dwyer, How not to argue that morality isn't innate: Comments on Jesse Prinz's “is morality innate?”.
    We must admire the ambition of Prinz’s title question. But does he provide a convincing answer to it? Prinz’s own view of morality as “a byproduct – accidental or invented – of faculties that evolved for different purposes (1),” which appears to express a negative reply, does not receive much direct argument here. Rather, Prinz’s main aim is to try to show that the considerations he believes are typically presented by moral nativists are insufficient or inadequate to establish that morality (...)
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  33.  7
    John F. Dwyer (1942). Whom Do You Say . . . ? Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):181-181.
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  34.  7
    John F. Dwyer (1945). Towards the Realization of God. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):742-742.
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  35.  57
    Susan Cartier Poland (2005). Bioethics, Biolaw, and Western Legal Heritage. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (2):211-218.
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  36.  33
    Daniel J. Dwyer (2004). Wittgenstein, Kant and Husserl on the Dialectical Temptations of Reason. Continental Philosophy Review 37 (3):277-307.
    There is an interesting sense in which philosophical reflection in the transcendental tradition is thought to be unnatural. Kant claims that metaphysical speculation is as natural as breathing and that transcendental critique is necessary to prevent reason from lapsing into a natural dialectic of dogmatism and skepticism. Husserl argues that the critique of theoretical reason is grounded upon a transcending of the natural attitude in which we are at first unjustifiably and naïvely directed toward objects as separate from consciousness. A (...)
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  37.  6
    John F. Dwyer (1945). The Logic and Reason in Christianity. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):746-746.
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  38.  29
    Daniel J. Dwyer (2012). David R. Cerbone: Understanding Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 28 (3):259-263.
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  39.  40
    Susan Dwyer (2011). Review of Abigail Levin, The Cost of Free Speech: Pornography, Hate Speech, and Their Challenge to Liberalism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (2).
  40.  5
    John F. Dwyer (1943). Leakage From a Catholic Parish. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 18 (1):189-190.
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  41.  12
    Daniel Dwyer (2006). A Phenomenology of Cognitive Desire. Idealistic Studies 36 (1):47-60.
    In this article I articulate how phenomenology can and should appropriate the theme of Platonic cognitive erôs. Erôs has two principal meanings: sexual passion and the desire for the whole that characterizes the philosophical life; in its cognitive sense, it implies dissatisfaction with partial truth and aiming at the givenness of the whole. The kind of lived-experience in which the being-true of the world is presented to and affectively allures the knower is a phenomenological analogue to what in Plato is (...)
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  42.  21
    James Dwyer (2013). On Flying to Ethics Conferences: Climate Change and Moral Responsiveness. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):1-18.
    Last year I flew to two bioethics conferences, one in Europe and one in North America. I also flew to Taiwan to teach abroad for a year. These were good things to do, or so I thought. I contributed to educational events, learned more about bioethics, and visited with friends and colleagues. But I worry that flying and other activities in my life are contributing to climate changes that will affect the health of vulnerable people, the life prospects of future (...)
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  43.  10
    James Dwyer (2005). Global Health and Justice. Bioethics 19 (5-6):460-475.
  44.  49
    Déirdre Dwyer (2009). The Epistemology of Testimony - Edited by Jennifer Lackey & Ernest Sosa. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):214-216.
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  45.  7
    John F. Dwyer (1945). Cloud and Weather Atlas. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):750-750.
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  46.  14
    Susan Cartier Poland & Laura Jane Bishop (2002). Bioethics and Cloning, Part I. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (3):305-323.
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  47.  9
    Barbara Eckardvont & Jeffrey S. Poland (2004). Mechanism and Explanation in Cognitive Neuroscience. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):972-984.
  48. Susan Dwyer, Censorship.
    For individuals at all points on the political spectrum, and especially for those engaged in any form of expressive enterprise – from comic book illustrators, to film directors, to performance artists – censorship typically carries very negative connotations. Indeed, for many, censorship is the very antithesis of freedom and creativity. However, we can and should conceive of censorship more neutrally – simply as the imposition of constraints. On such a construal, censorship is not obviously always a Bad Thing. This point (...)
     
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  49.  10
    John F. Dwyer (1947). Catechetical Documents of Pope Plus X. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 22 (4):749-749.
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  50.  10
    Edward M. Dwyer (1955). For the National Catholic Education Association. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 29:276-282.
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