Search results for 'Helene Dwyer Poland' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Helene Dwyer Poland (1990). The Call of Stories. Teaching Philosophy 13 (1):75-76.score: 870.0
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  2. Abe Oudshoorn, Catherine Ward-Griffin, Cheryl Forchuk, Helene Berman & Blake Poland (2013). Client-Provider Relationships in a Community Health Clinic for People Who Are Experiencing Homelessness. Nursing Inquiry 20 (4):317-328.score: 240.0
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  3. Jeffrey Stephen Poland (1994). Physicalism, the Philosophical Foundations. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Physicalism is a program for building a unified system of knowledge about the world on the basis of the view that everything is a manifestation of the physical aspects of existence. Jeffrey Poland presents a systematic and comprehensive exploration of the philosophical foundations of this program. He investigates the core ideas, motivating values, and presuppositions of physicalism; the constraints upon an adequate formulation of physicalist doctrine; the epistemological and modal status, the scope, and the methodological roles of physicalist principles. (...)
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  4. Jeffrey S. Poland & Barbara Von Eckardt (2004). Mechanism and Explanation in Cognitive Neuroscience. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):972-984.score: 30.0
    The aim of this paper is to examine the usefulness of the Machamer, Darden, and Craver (2000) mechanism approach to gaining an understanding of explanation in cognitive neuroscience. We argue that although the mechanism approach can capture many aspects of explanation in cognitive neuroscience, it cannot capture everything. In particular, it cannot completely capture all aspects of the content and significance of mental representations or the evaluative features constitutive of psychopathology.
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  5. Susan Dwyer (2006). How Good is the Linguistic Analogy? In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen P. Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind, Vol. 2: Culture and Cognition. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    A nativist moral psychology, modeled on the successes of theoretical linguistics, provides the best framework for explaining the acquisition of moral capacities and the diversity of moral judgment across the species. After a brief presentation of a poverty of the moral stimulus argument, this chapter sketches a view according to which a so-called Universal Moral Grammar provides a set of parameterizable principles whose specific values are set by the child's environment, resulting in the acquisition of a moral idiolect. The principles (...)
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  6. James Dwyer (2007). What's Wrong with the Global Migration of Health Care Professionals? Individual Rights and International Justice. Hastings Center Report 37 (5):36-43.score: 30.0
    : When health care workers migrate from poor countries to rich countries, they are exercising an important human right and helping rich countries fulfill obligations of social justice. They are also, however, creating problems of social justice in the countries they leave. Solving these problems requires balancing social needs against individual rights and studying the relationship of social justice to international justice.
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  7. Philip Dwyer (1989). Freedom and Rule-Following in Wittgenstein and Sartre. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (September):49-68.score: 30.0
  8. Susan Dwyer & Paul M. Pietroski (1996). Believing in Language. Philosophy of Science 63 (3):338-373.score: 30.0
    We propose that the generalizations of linguistic theory serve to ascribe beliefs to humans. Ordinary speakers would explicitly (and sincerely) deny having these rather esoteric beliefs about language--e.g., the belief that an anaphor must be bound in its governing category. Such ascriptions can also seem problematic in light of certain theoretical considerations having to do with concept possession, revisability, and so on. Nonetheless, we argue that ordinary speakers believe the propositions expressed by certain sentences of linguistic theory, and that linguistics (...)
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  9. Daniel J. Dwyer (2007). Husserl's Appropriation of the Psychological Concepts of Apperception and Attention. Husserl Studies 23 (2):83-118.score: 30.0
    In the sixth Logical Investigation, Husserl thematizes the surplus (Überschuß) of the perceptual intention whereby the intending goes beyond the partial givenness of a perceptual object to the object as a whole. This surplus is an apperceptive surplus that transcends the purely perceptual substance (Gehalt) or sensed content (empfundene Inhalt) available to a perceiver at any one time. This surplus can be described on the one hand as a synthetic link to future, possible, active experience; to intend an object is (...)
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  10. Daniel J. Dwyer (2004). Wittgenstein, Kant and Husserl on the Dialectical Temptations of Reason. Continental Philosophy Review 37 (3):277-307.score: 30.0
    There is an interesting sense in which philosophical reflection in the transcendental tradition is thought to be unnatural. Kant claims that metaphysical speculation is as natural as breathing and that transcendental critique is necessary to prevent reason from lapsing into a natural dialectic of dogmatism and skepticism. Husserl argues that the critique of theoretical reason is grounded upon a transcending of the natural attitude in which we are at first unjustifiably and naïvely directed toward objects as separate from consciousness. A (...)
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  11. Jeffrey S. Poland (1994). Physicalism: The Empirical Foundations. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
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  12. Susan Dwyer (1999). Reconciliation for Realists. Ethics and International Affairs 13 (1):81–98.score: 30.0
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  13. Yali Cong, Linying Hu & James Dwyer (2005). The VIP Floors. Hastings Center Report 35 (1):16-17.score: 30.0
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  14. Philip Dwyer (2002). Stroud, Colour, and Metaphysical Satisfaction. Dialogue 41 (3):569-587.score: 30.0
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  15. Susan Cartier Poland (1997). Landmark Legal Cases in Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (2):191-209.score: 30.0
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  16. Susan Cartier Poland (2000). Genes, Patents, and Bioethics--Will History Repeat Itself? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (3):265-281.score: 30.0
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  17. Richard M. Anderson, Laura Jane Bishop, Martina Darragh, Harriet H. Gray & Susan Cartier Poland (2006). Pharmacists and Conscientious Objection. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (4):379-396.score: 30.0
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  18. Laura Jane Bishop & Susan Cartier Poland (2002). Bioethics and Cloning, Part II. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (4):391-407.score: 30.0
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  19. Daniel Dwyer (2006). A Phenomenology of Cognitive Desire. Idealistic Studies 36 (1):47-60.score: 30.0
    In this article I articulate how phenomenology can and should appropriate the theme of Platonic cognitive erôs. Erôs has two principal meanings: sexual passion and the desire for the whole that characterizes the philosophical life; in its cognitive sense, it implies dissatisfaction with partial truth and aiming at the givenness of the whole. The kind of lived-experience in which the being-true of the world is presented to and affectively allures the knower is a phenomenological analogue to what in Plato is (...)
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  20. Johanna Dwyer & Franklin M. Loew (1994). Nutritional Risks of Vegan Diets to Women and Children: Are They Preventable? [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 7 (1):87-109.score: 30.0
    The potential health risks of vegan diets specifically for women and children are discussed. Women and children are at higher risk of malnutrition from consumption of unsupplemented vegan diets than are adult males. Those who are very young, pregnant, lactating, elderly, or who suffer from poverty, disease or other environmentally induced disadvantages are at special risk. The size of these risks is difficult to quantify from existing studies. Fortunately the risk of dietary deficiency disease can be avoided and the potential (...)
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  21. Susan Cartier Poland (2005). Bioethics, Biolaw, and Western Legal Heritage. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (2):211-218.score: 30.0
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  22. Déirdre Dwyer (2003). An Anglo–American Philosophy of Law, or a Philosophy of Anglo–American Law? Res Publica 9 (1):65-71.score: 30.0
  23. Susan Cartier Poland & Laura Jane Bishop (2002). Bioethics and Cloning, Part I. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (3):305-323.score: 30.0
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  24. R. A. Dwyer (1971). The Heraldry of Hector and its Antiquity. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 34:325-326.score: 30.0
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  25. Martina Darragh, Harriet Gray, Pat Milmoe McCarrick & Susan Cartier Poland (2002). Searching Across Boundaries: National Information Resource on Ethics and Human Genetics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (1):103-113.score: 30.0
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  26. Susan Cartier Poland (1998). Bioethics Commissions Town Meetings with a "Blue, Blue Ribbon". Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8 (1):91-109.score: 30.0
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  27. Susan Cartier Poland (2004). Embryonic Stem Cell Funding: California, Here I Come? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (4):407-409.score: 30.0
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  28. Jeffrey S. Poland, Barbara von Eckardt & Will Spaulding (1994). Problems with the DSM Approach to Classifying Psychopathology. In George Graham & G.L. Stephens (eds.), Philosophical Psychopathology. MIT Press.score: 30.0
     
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  29. Jeffrey S. Poland & Barbara Von Eckardt (2000). In Defense of the Standard View. Protosociology 14:312-331.score: 30.0
     
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  30. Susan Dwyer (2009). Moral Dumbfounding and the Linguistic Analogy: Methodological Implications for the Study of Moral Judgment. Mind and Language 24 (3):274-296.score: 20.0
    The manifest dissociation between our capacity to make moral judgments and our ability to provide justifications for them, a phenomenon labeled Moral Dumbfounding, has important implications for the theory and practice of moral psychology. I articulate and develop the Linguistic Analogy as a robust alternative to existing sentimentalist models of moral judgment inspired by this phenomenon. The Linguistic Analogy motivates a crucial distinction between moral acceptability and moral permissibility judgments, and thereby calls into question prevailing methods used in the study (...)
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  31. Susan Dwyer, Pornography.score: 20.0
    Pornography has attracted a good deal of academic and political attention, primarily from feminists of various persuasions, moral philosophers, and legal scholars. Surprisingly less work has been forthcoming from film theorists, given how much pornography has been produced on video and DVD and is now available through live streaming video over the Internet. Indeed, it is not until 1989, with the publication of Linda Williams’ groundbreaking Hard Core, that pornography is distinguished, in terms of its content, intent, and governing conventions, (...)
     
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  32. Larry Dwyer (1975). Time Travel and Changing the Past. Philosophical Studies 27 (5):341 - 350.score: 20.0
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  33. Susan Dwyer, How not to argue that morality isn't innate: Comments on Jesse Prinz's “is morality innate?”.score: 20.0
    We must admire the ambition of Prinz’s title question. But does he provide a convincing answer to it? Prinz’s own view of morality as “a byproduct – accidental or invented – of faculties that evolved for different purposes (1),” which appears to express a negative reply, does not receive much direct argument here. Rather, Prinz’s main aim is to try to show that the considerations he believes are typically presented by moral nativists are insufficient or inadequate to establish that morality (...)
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  34. Philip Dwyer (2010). Necessity and Possibility: The Logical Strategy of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (3):402-403.score: 20.0
    This book is a foray into the thorny interpretive issue of what to make of Kant's so-called "Metaphysical Deduction" of the categories. As with many of the arguments in the first Critique, the claim of the Metaphysical Deduction is easier to make out than its argument. The claim is that by some or other reference to "general logic," one may obtain a "transcendental logic," i.e., a justification (or "deduction") of the categories (of the understanding) necessary to the (very) possibility of (...)
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  35. Philip Dwyer (1990). Sense and Subjectivity: A Study of Wittgenstein and Merleau-Ponty. E.J. Brill.score: 20.0
    The philosophies of Merleau-Ponty and the later Wittgenstein are shown to yield a common position opposing 'realist' attempts to reduce appearance, sense, and ...
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  36. Susan Dwyer, Bryce Huebner & Marc D. Hauser (2010). The Linguistic Analogy: Motivations, Results, and Speculations. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):486-510.score: 20.0
    Inspired by the success of generative linguistics and transformational grammar, proponents of the linguistic analogy (LA) in moral psychology hypothesize that careful attention to folk-moral judgments is likely to reveal a small set of implicit rules and structures responsible for the ubiquitous and apparently unbounded capacity for making moral judgments. As a theoretical hypothesis, LA thus requires a rich description of the computational structures that underlie mature moral judgments, an account of the acquisition and development of these structures, and an (...)
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  37. Déirdre Dwyer (2009). The Epistemology of Testimony - Edited by Jennifer Lackey & Ernest Sosa. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):214-216.score: 20.0
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  38. Susan Dwyer, Censorship.score: 20.0
    For individuals at all points on the political spectrum, and especially for those engaged in any form of expressive enterprise – from comic book illustrators, to film directors, to performance artists – censorship typically carries very negative connotations. Indeed, for many, censorship is the very antithesis of freedom and creativity. However, we can and should conceive of censorship more neutrally – simply as the imposition of constraints. On such a construal, censorship is not obviously always a Bad Thing. This point (...)
     
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  39. James Dwyer (2009). When the Discharge Plan is Deportation: Hospitals, Immigrants, and Social Responsibility. Bioethics 23 (3):ii-iv.score: 20.0
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  40. Susan Dwyer, Moral Psychology as Cognitive Science: Explananda and Acquisition.score: 20.0
    Depending on how one looks at it, we have been enjoying or suffering a significant empirical turn in moral psychology during this first decade of the 21st century. While philosophers have, from time to time, considered empirical matters with respect to morality, those who took an interest in actual (rather than ideal) moral agents were primarily concerned with whether particular moral theories were ‘too demanding’ for creatures like us (Flanagan, 1991; Williams, 1976; Wolf, 1982). Faithful adherence to Utilitarianism or Kantianism (...)
     
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  41. James Dwyer (2009). How to Connect Bioethics and Environmental Ethics: Health, Sustainability, and Justice. Bioethics 23 (9):497-502.score: 20.0
    In this paper, I explore one way to bring bioethics and environmental ethics closer together. I focus on a question at the interface of health, sustainability, and justice: How well does a society promote health with the use of no more than a just share of environmental capacity? To address this question, I propose and discuss a mode of assessment that combines a measurement of population health, an estimate of environmental sustainability, and an assumption about what constitutes a fair or (...)
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  42. Susan Dwyer, Mind Your Morals.score: 20.0
    Morality is so steeped in the quotidian details of praise and blame, of do’s and don’t’s, and of questions about the justifiability of certain practices it is no wonder that philosophers and psychologists have devoted relatively little effort to investigating what makes moral life possible in the first place. In making this claim, I neither ignore Kant and his intellectual descendants, nor the large literature in developmental moral psychology from Piaget on. My charge has to do with this fact: (...)
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  43. Paul M. Pietroski & Susan J. Dwyer (1999). Knowledge by Ignoring. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):781-781.score: 20.0
    Some cases of implicit knowledge involve representations of (implicitly) known propositions, but this is not the only important type of implicit knowledge. Chomskian linguistics suggests another model of how humans can know more than is accessible to consciousness. Innate capacities to focus on a small range of possibilities, thereby ignoring many others, need not be grounded by inner representations of any possibilities ignored. This model may apply to many domains where human cognition “fills a gap” between stimuli and judgment.
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  44. Robin W. Roberts & Peggy D. Dwyer (1998). An Analysis of Materiality and Reasonable Assurance: Professional Mystification and Paternalism in Auditing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (5):115-124.score: 20.0
    Critical analyses of the audit profession have become more common in recent years. Many of these analyses focus on the entire audit profession in developing their criticisms and concerns. In this paper, the scope of analysis is narrowed to examine in depth the auditing profession's use of the concepts of reasonable assurance and materiality in audit performance and audit communications. Reasonable assurance and materiality are the terms that auditors use to describe the scope of their responsibility to the public. Similarly, (...)
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  45. James Dwyer (2005). Global Health and Justice. Bioethics 19 (5-6):460-475.score: 20.0
  46. Barbara Eckardvont & Jeffrey S. Poland (2004). Mechanism and Explanation in Cognitive Neuroscience. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):972-984.score: 20.0
  47. Dominic M. Dwyer, Michael E. Le Pelley, David N. George, Mark Haselgrove & Robert C. Honey (2009). Straw-Men and Selective Citation Are Needed to Argue That Associative-Link Formation Makes No Contribution to Human Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):206-207.score: 20.0
    Mitchell et al. contend that there is no need to posit a contribution based on the formation of associative links to human learning. In order to sustain this argument, they have ignored evidence which is difficult to explain with propositional accounts; and they have mischaracterised the evidence they do cite by neglecting features of these experiments that contradict a propositional account.
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  48. Harriet Hutson Gray Susan Cartier Poland (2008). Medical Tourism: Crossing Borders to Access Health Care. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (2):pp. 193-201.score: 20.0
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  49. Daniel Dwyer (2007). Edmund Husserl & Eugen Fink: Beginnings and Ends in Phenomenology, 1928–1938. Review of Metaphysics 60 (4):856-858.score: 20.0
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  50. Susan Dwyer (2008). Dupoux and Jacob's Moral Instincts: Throwing Out the Baby, the Bathwater and the Bathtub. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):1-2.score: 20.0
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