Search results for 'Helene Pollard' (try it on Scholar)

928 found
Order:
  1.  22
    Patrick Amar, Pascal Ballet, Georgia Barlovatz-Meimon, Arndt Benecke, Gilles Bernot, Yves Bouligand, Paul Bourguine, Franck Delaplace, Jean-Marc Delosme, Maurice Demarty, Itzhak Fishov, Jean Fourmentin-Guilbert, Joe Fralick, Jean-Louis Giavitto, Bernard Gleyse, Christophe Godin, Roberto Incitti, François Képès, Catherine Lange, Lois Le Sceller, Corinne Loutellier, Olivier Michel, Franck Molina, Chantal Monnier, René Natowicz, Vic Norris, Nicole Orange, Helene Pollard, Derek Raine, Camille Ripoll, Josette Rouviere-Yaniv, Milton Saier, Paul Soler, Pierre Tambourin, Michel Thellier, Philippe Tracqui, Dave Ussery, Jean-Claude Vincent, Jean-Pierre Vannier, Philippa Wiggins & Abdallah Zemirline (2002). Hyperstructures, Genome Analysis and I-Cells. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (4):357-373.
    New concepts may prove necessary to profit from the avalanche of sequence data on the genome, transcriptome, proteome and interactome and to relate this information to cell physiology. Here, we focus on the concept of large activity-based structures, or hyperstructures, in which a variety of types of molecules are brought together to perform a function. We review the evidence for the existence of hyperstructures responsible for the initiation of DNA replication, the sequestration of newly replicated origins of replication, cell division (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  7
    Luke Pollard (2008). Utilitarianism is Inhuman. Think 6 (16):69.
    In this article Luke Pollard examines and expounds the integrity objections to Utilitarianism. He argues for their veracity, and concludes that any ethical theory, such as Utilitarianism, which makes itself impossible for humans to follow, is not what may be considered as a.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  14
    Scott Martin & Carl Pollard (2012). A Higher-Order Theory of Presupposition. Studia Logica 100 (4):727-751.
    So-called 'dynamic' semantic theories such as Kamp's discourse representation theory and Heim's file change semantics account for such phenomena as cross-sentential anaphora, donkey anaphora, and the novelty condition on indefinites, but compare unfavorably with Montague semantics in some important respects (clarity and simplicity of mathematical foundations, compositionality, handling of quantification and coordination). Preliminary efforts have been made by Muskens and by de Groote to revise and extend Montague semantics to cover dynamic phenomena. We present a new higher-order theory of discourse (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  5
    M. Andrew Moshier & Carl J. Pollard (1994). The Domain of Set-Valued Feature Structures. Linguistics and Philosophy 17 (6):607-631.
    It is well-known that feature structures can be fruitfully viewed as forming a Scott domain. Once a linguistically motivated notion of set value in feature structures is countenanced, however, this is no longer possible inasmuch as unification of set values in general fails to yield a unique result. In Pollard and Moshier 1990 it was shown that, while falling short of forming a Scott domain, the set of feature structures possibly containing set values satisfies the weaker condition of forming (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  4
    Brian Pollard (2010). Fatal Licence: Commentary on the 'Consent to Medical Treatment and Palliative Care Amendment Bill 2008'. [REVIEW] Bioethics Research Notes 22 (2):19.
    Pollard, Brian The extreme difficulties in attempting to make safe euthanasia law, with an argument of treatment in case of patients who can ask for death to escape from pain and patients who are not in a position to ask, are documented. Published findings of five large inquiries into the issue show that it would not be possible to make such law without endangering the lives of some of those who did not want to die.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  4
    David Pollard (2012). Francesca da Rimini. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1):11 - 13.
    David Pollard's previously unpublished poem 'Francesca da Rimini'.
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Bill Pollard (2006). Explaining Actions with Habits. American Philosophical Quarterly 43 (1):57 - 69.
    From time to time we explain what people do by referring to their habits. We explain somebody’s putting the kettle on in the morning as done through “force of habit”. We explain somebody’s missing a turning by saying that she carried straight on “out of habit”. And we explain somebody’s biting her nails as a manifestation of “a bad habit”. These are all examples of what will be referred to here as habit explanations. Roughly speaking, they explain by referring to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  8.  4
    P. Pollard (1982). Human Reasoning: Some Possible Effects of Availability. Cognition 12 (1):65-96.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   31 citations  
  9.  28
    Nicholas J. Pollard (1932). Dr. Tolman on Entropy. Modern Schoolman 9 (4):76-78.
  10. Andrew Pollard (2010). Directing the Teaching and Learning Research Programme: Or ‘Trying to Fly a Glider Made Of Jelly’. British Journal of Educational Studies 58 (1):27-46.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  11.  42
    Bill Pollard (2003). Can Virtuous Actions Be Both Habitual and Rational? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (4):411-425.
    Virtuous actions seem to be both habitual and rational. But if we combine an intuitive understanding of habituality with the currently predominant paradigm of rational action, these two features of virtuous actions are hard to reconcile. Intuitively, acting habitually is acting as one has before in similar contexts, and automatically, that is, without thinking about it. Meanwhile, contemporary philosophers tend to assume the truth of what I call the reasons theory of rational action, which states that all rational actions are (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  12.  19
    Christopher Pollard (2014). Is Merleau-Ponty’s Position in Phenomenology of Perception a New Type of Transcendental Idealism? Idealistic Studies 44 (1):119-138.
    It has recently been suggested that Merleau-Ponty’s position in Phenomenology of Perception is a unique form of transcendental idealism. The general claim is that in spite of his critique of “Kantianism,” Merleau-Ponty’s position comes out as a form of transcendental idealism that takes the perceptual processes of the lived body as the transcendental constituting condition for the possibility of experience. In this article I critically appraise this claim. I argue that if the term “idealist” is intended in a sufficiently similar (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  1
    J. St B. T. Evans & P. Pollard (1981). On Defining Rationality Unreasonably. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):335-336.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  14.  16
    D. E. B. Pollard (1978). Contemporary Aspects of Philosophy. Philosophical Studies 26:273-274.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  2
    Amanda Sibley, Andrew J. Pollard, Raymond Fitzpatrick & Mark Sheehan (2016). Developing a New Justification for Assent. BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundCurrent guidelines do not clearly outline when assent should be attained from paediatric research participants, nor do they detail the necessary elements of the assent process. This stems from the fact that the fundamental justification behind the concept of assent is misunderstood. In this paper, we critically assess three widespread ethical arguments used for assent: children’s rights, the best interests of the child, and respect for a child’s developing autonomy. We then outline a newly-developed two-fold justification for the assent process: (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  3
    Caroline H. D. Jones, Tessa M. Pollard, Carolyn D. Summerbell & Helen Ball (2013). Could Parental Rules Play a Role in the Association Between Short Sleep and Obesity in Young Children? Journal of Biosocial Science 46 (3):1-14.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  9
    A. J. Pollard & Delfryn Thomas (1999). CyberPower and CyberSolidarity. Semiotics:243-261.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  2
    Stephen E. Newstead, Paul Pollard, Jonathan StB. T. Evans & Julie L. Allen (1992). The Source of Belief Bias Effects in Syllogistic Reasoning. Cognition 45 (3):257-284.
  19. Stephen E. Newstead, Paul Pollard, Jonathan St B. T. Evans & Julie L. Allen (1992). The Source of Belief Bias Effects in Syllogistic Reasoning. Cognition 45 (3):257-284.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  20.  8
    Robert A. Giacalone & Hinda Greyser Pollard (1987). The Efficacy of Accounts for a Breach of Confidentiality by Management. Journal of Business Ethics 6 (5):393 - 397.
    Management and non-management employees of a northeastern bank read a description of a manager who engaged in a breach of confidentiality. Subjects were asked to evaluate the acceptability of 27 excuses. Results showed that subjects' ratings of acceptability were affected by their individual perception of the severity of the stimulus manager's breach of confidentiality. Subjects' rank did not affect acceptability of accounts.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  21.  62
    Bill Pollard (2005). Naturalizing the Space of Reasons. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (1):69 – 82.
    Given the Sellarsian distinction between the space of causes and the space of reasons, the naturalist seeks to articulate how these two spaces are unproblematically related. In Mind and World (1996) John McDowell suggests that such a naturalism can be achieved by pointing out that we work our way into the space of reasons by the process of upbringing he calls Bildung. 'The resulting habits of thought and action', writes McDowell, 'are second nature' (p. 84). In this paper I expose (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22. Shalom Lappin, C. Fox & C. Pollard, A Higher-Order Fine-Grained Logic for Intensional Semantics.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23.  35
    Carl Pollard (2015). Agnostic Hyperintensional Semantics. Synthese 192 (3):535-562.
    A hyperintensional semantics for natural language is proposed which is agnostic about the question of whether propositions are sets of worlds or worlds are sets of propositions. Montague’s theory of intensional senses is replaced by a weaker theory, written in standard classical higher-order logic, of fine-grained senses which are in a many-to-one correspondence with intensions; Montague’s theory can then be recovered from the proposed theory by identifying the type of propositions with the type of sets of worlds and adding an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  11
    D. E. B. Pollard (1987). Bradley's Logic. Philosophical Studies 31:445-446.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  16
    Luke Pollard & Rebacca Massey-Chase (2008). An Argument About Free Will. Philosophy Now 66:28-29.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Irina Pollard (2009). Bioscience Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27.  21
    D. E. B. Pollard (1982). Dream Report Semantics. Philosophical Studies 29:140-147.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  9
    D. E. B. Pollard (1978). Logic and Interpretation. Philosophical Studies 26:159-166.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  18
    D. E. B. Pollard (1989). Authors Without Paradox. British Journal of Aesthetics 29 (4):363-366.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  8
    D. E. B. Pollard (1973). Interpreting Modern Philosophy. Philosophical Studies 22:307-308.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  8
    D. E. B. Pollard (1978). Liberation Theology. Philosophical Studies 26:300-302.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  7
    A. J. Pollard & Adam Vile (1998). Power Structures On The Internet. Semiotics:198-212.
  33.  6
    John Pollard & G. S. Kirk (1976). The Nature of Greek Myths. Journal of Hellenic Studies 96 (2):210.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  34.  27
    Stephen Pollard (1988). Plural Quantification and the Axiom of Choice. Philosophical Studies 54 (3):393 - 397.
  35.  7
    D. E. B. Pollard (1976). Modal Thinking. Philosophical Studies 25:342-345.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Paul Pollard (1990). Natural Selection for the Selection Task: Limits to Social Exchange Theory. Cognition 36 (2):195-204.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  37. Andrew Pollard & A. Filer (1996). The Social World of Children's Learning: Case Studies of Pupils From Four to Seven. British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (4):447-448.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  38.  13
    Stephen Pollard (1985). Plural Quantification and the Iterative Concept of Set. Philosophy Research Archives 11:579-587.
    Arecent paper by George Boolos suggests that it is philosophically respectable to use monadic second order logic in one’s explication of the iterative concept of set. I shall here give a partial indication of the new range of theories of the iterative hierarchy which are thus madeavailable to philosophers of set theory.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  39.  28
    S. Pollard (2013). Mathematics and the Good Life. Philosophia Mathematica 21 (1):93-109.
    We mathematical animals should be grateful that mathematics is instrumentally useful. We should not, however, forget its other contributions to human happiness. Bertrand Russell and John Dewey offer timely reminders that provide insight into the role of non-mathematicians in the evaluation of mathematics.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  8
    David Pollard (1989). Inscriptions: Between Phenomenology and Structuralism (Review). Philosophy and Literature 13 (1):187-188.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  5
    D. E. B. Pollard (1976). The Dialectic of Ideology and Technology. Philosophical Studies 25:367-369.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  3
    W. Geoffrey Arnott & J. Pollard (1979). Birds in Greek Life and Myth. Journal of Hellenic Studies 99 (1):192.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  43.  5
    John Pollard & J. Fontenrose (1981). The Delphic Oracle: Its Responses and Operations with a Catalogue of Responses. Journal of Hellenic Studies 101:182.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  2
    Lucía F. Franchini & Katherine S. Pollard (2015). Can a Few Non-Coding Mutations Make a Human Brain? Bioessays 37 (10):1054-1061.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  14
    Stephen Pollard (2014). Reuben Hersh. Experiencing Mathematics: What Do We Do, When We Do Mathematics?. Providence, Rhode Island: American Mathematical Society, 2014. ISBN 978-0-8218-9420-0. Pp. Xvii + 291. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 22 (2):271-274.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  23
    S. Pollard (2013). Dianoia Left and Right. Philosophia Mathematica 21 (3):309-322.
    In Plato's Phaedrus, Socrates offers two speeches, the first portraying madness as mere disease, the second celebrating madness as divine inspiration. Each speech is correct, says Socrates, though neither is complete. The two kinds of madness are like the left and right sides of a living body: no account that focuses on just one half can be adequate. In a recent paper, Hugh Benson gives a left-handed speech about a psychic condition endemic among mathematicians: dianoia. Benson acknowledges that his account (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  31
    Stephen Pollard (1997). Who Needs Mereology? Philosophia Mathematica 5 (1):65-70.
    This note examines the mereological component of Geoffrey Hellman's most recent version of modal structuralism. There are plausible forms of agnosticism that benefit only a little from Hellman's mereological turn.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48.  23
    Stephen Pollard (1999). Milne's Measure of Confirmation. Analysis 59 (4):335–338.
  49.  40
    Bill Pollard, The Rationality of Habitual Actions.
    We are creatures of habit. Familiar ways of doing things in familiar contexts become automatic for us. That is to say, when we acquire a habit we can act without thinking about it at all. Habits free our minds to think about other things. Without this capacity for habitual action our daily lives would be impossible. Our minds would be crowded with innumerable mundane considerations and decisions. Habitual actions are not always mundane. Aristotle famously said that acting morally is a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  5
    Luke Pollard (2009). Book. Philosophy Now 74:40-40.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 928