Search results for 'Henning Gibbons' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Henning Gibbons (2009). Evaluative Priming From Subliminal Emotional Words: Insights From Event-Related Potentials and Individual Differences Related to Anxiety. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):383-400.score: 240.0
  2. Sarah L. Gibbons (1994). Kant's Theory of Imagination: Bridging Gaps in Judgement and Experience. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This book departs from much of the scholarship on Kant by demonstrating the centrality of imagination to Kant's philosophy as a whole. In Kant's works, human experience is simultaneously passive and active, thought and sensed, free and unfree: these dualisms are often thought of as unfortunate byproducts of his system. Gibbons, however, shows that imagination performs a vital function in "bridging gaps" between the different elements of cognition and experience. Thus, the role imagination plays in Kant's works expresses his (...)
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  3. J. Gibbons (2010). Missing the Obvious: Reply to Moon. Mind 119 (473):153-158.score: 60.0
    In Gibbons 2006, I presented a counterexample to epistemic internalism, the view that justification supervenes on the internal. Andrew Moon has replied to this paper, asking what generates the intuition behind the counterexample. In this note, I try to answer that question.
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  4. John Gibbons (2013). The Norm of Belief. Oup Oxford.score: 60.0
    John Gibbons presents a new account of epistemic normativity. Belief seems to come with a built-in set of standards or norms--truth and reasonableness, for example--but which one is the fundamental norm of belief? He explains both the norms of knowledge and of truth in terms of the fundamental norm, the one that tells you to be reasonable.
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  5. John Gibbons (2006). Mental Causation Without Downward Causation. Philosophical Review 115 (1):79-103.score: 30.0
    to counterintuitive results. Suppose a mental event, m1, causes another mental event, m2. Unless the mental and the physical are completely independent, there will be a physical event in your brain or your body or the physical world as a whole that underlies this event. The mental event occurs at least partly in virtue of the physical event’s occurring. And the same goes for m2 [2] and p2. Let’s not worry about what exactly “underlying” or “in virtue of” means here. (...)
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  6. Tim Henning (2011). Moral Realism and Two-Dimensional Semantics. Ethics 121 (4):717-748.score: 30.0
    Moral realists can, and should, allow that the truth-conditional content of moral judgments is in part attitudinal. I develop a two-dimensional semantics that embraces attitudinal content while preserving realist convictions about the independence of moral facts from our attitudes. Relative to worlds “considered as counterfactual,” moral terms rigidly track objective, response-independent properties. But relative to different ways the actual world turns out to be, they nonrigidly track whatever properties turn out to be the objects of our relevant attitudes. This theory (...)
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  7. Michael Peters, Paulo Ghiraldelli, Berislav Žarnić, Andrew Gibbons & Tina Besley (eds.) (1999). Encyclopaedia of Educational Philosophy and Theory. University of Split and PESA.score: 30.0
    The Encyclopaedia of Philosophy of Education contains surveys of philosophical theories of education and philosophical analyses of educational issues. The Encyclopaedia of Philosophy of Education is a dynamic study space for students, teachers, researchers and professionals in the field of education, philosophy and social sciences offering theoretically concurrent expositions of the topics of theoretical and practical interest in philosophy and education.
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  8. S. Gibbons & C. Legg (2013). Higher-Order One–Many Problems in Plato's Philebus and Recent Australian Metaphysics. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (1):119 - 138.score: 30.0
    We discuss the one?many problem as it appears in the Philebus and find that it is not restricted to the usually understood problem about the identity of universals across particulars that instantiate them (the Hylomorphic Dispersal Problem). In fact some of the most interesting aspects of the problem occur purely with respect to the relationship between Forms. We argue that contemporary metaphysicians may draw from the Philebus at least three different one?many relationships between universals themselves: instantiation, subkind and part, and (...)
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  9. Tim Henning (forthcoming). From Choice to Chance? Saving People, Fairness, and Lotteries. Philosophical Review.score: 30.0
    Many authors in ethics, economics and political science endorse the Lottery Requirement, i.e. the following thesis: Where different parties have equal moral claims to one indivisible good, it is morally obligatory to let a fair lottery decide which party is to receive the good. This article defends skepticism about the Lottery Requirement. Three broad strategies of defending such a requirement are distinguished: the surrogate satisfaction account, the procedural account and the ideal consent account. It is argued that none of these (...)
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  10. John Gibbons (2001). Knowledge in Action. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):579-600.score: 30.0
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  11. John Gibbons (2009). You Gotta Do What You Gotta Do. Noûs 43 (1):157-177.score: 30.0
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  12. John Gibbons (2010). Things That Make Things Reasonable. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (2):335-361.score: 30.0
  13. Tim Henning (2011). Why Be Yourself? Kantian Respect and Frankfurtian Identification. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):725-745.score: 30.0
    Harry Frankfurt has claimed that some of our desires are ‘internal’, i.e., our own in a special sense. I defend the idea that a desire's being internal matters in a normative, reasons-involving sense, and offer an explanation for this fact. The explanation is Kantian in spirit. We have reason to respect the desires of persons in so far as respecting them is a way to respect the persons who have them (in some cases, ourselves). But if desires matter normatively in (...)
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  14. Brian Henning (2011). Standing in Livestock's 'Long Shadow': The Ethics of Eating Meat on a Small Planet. Ethics and the Environment 16 (2):63-93.score: 30.0
    In 2007, 275 million tons of meat1 were produced worldwide, enough for 92 pounds for every person (Halweil 2008, 1). On one level, this fourfold increase in meat production since 1960 might be seen as a great success story about the spread of prosperity and wealth. President Herbert Hoover's memorable 1928 campaign pledge to put "a chicken in every pot and a car in every garage" has, at least for many in the developed world, largely been realized. This juxtaposition of (...)
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  15. John Gibbons (2005). Qualia: They're Not What They Seem. Philosophical Studies 126 (3):397-428.score: 30.0
    Whether or not qualia are ways things seem, the view that qualia have the properties typically attributed to them is unjustified. Ways things seem do not have many of the properties commonly attributed to them. For example, inverted ways things seem are impossible. If ways things seem do not have the features commonly attributed to them, and qualia do have those same features, this looks like good reason to distinguish the two. But if your reasons for believing (...)
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  16. John Gibbons (2009). Reason in Action. In Lucy O'Brien & Matthew Soteriou (eds.), Mental Actions. Oxford University Press. 72.score: 30.0
    There is a problem with a very common theory of the nature of action. The problem stems from the fact that causation by practical reasons may be a necessary condition for being an intentional action, but it can’t be a sufficient condition. After all, desires and intentions are caused by practical reasons that rationalize them, but they’re clearly not actions. Even if all actions are events or changes and desires and intentions aren’t, the acquistion of a desire or an intention (...)
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  17. G. W. Gibbons (2002). The Maximum Tension Principle in General Relativity. Foundations of Physics 32 (12):1891-1901.score: 30.0
    I suggest that classical General Relativity in four spacetime dimensions incorporates a Principal of Maximal Tension and give arguments to show that the value of the maximal tension is $\frac{{c^4 }}{{4G}}$ . The relation of this principle to other, possibly deeper, maximal principles is discussed, in particular the relation to the tension in string theory. In that case it leads to a purely classical relation between G and the classical string coupling constant α′ and the velocity of light c which (...)
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  18. Tim Henning (2014). Normative Reasons Contextualism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (3):593-624.score: 30.0
    This article argues for the view that statements about normative reasons are context-sensitive. Specifically, they are sensitive to a contextual parameter specifying a relevant person's or group's body of information. The argument for normative reasons contextualism starts from the context-sensitivity of the normative “ought” and the further premise that reasons must be aligned with oughts. It is incoherent, I maintain, to suppose that someone normatively ought to φ but has most reason not to φ. So given that oughts depend on (...)
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  19. John Gibbons (2010). Seeing What You're Doing. In T. Szabo Gendler & J. Hawthorne (eds.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Do we have privileged access to what we’re intentionally doing? Well, that probably depends on what privileged access is. One way to think about privileged access is to try to identify a true formal principle. One thing you’ll need to do when identifying the formal principle is to specify the relevant range of propositions to which you have privileged access. These ranges are usually specified by subject matter: propositions about your own current, conscious propositional attitudes, propositions about your own sensations, (...)
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  20. John Gibbons (2006). Access Externalism. Mind 115 (457):19-39.score: 30.0
    This paper argues for externalism about justification on the basis of thought experiments. I present cases in which two individuals are intrinsically and introspectively indistinguishable and in which intuitively, one is justified in believing that p while the other is not. I also examine an argument for internalism based on the ideas that we have privileged access to whether or not our own beliefs are justified and that only internalism is compatible with this privilege. I isolate what I take to (...)
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  21. Kurt Baier, J. J. C. Smart, Alvin Plantinga, William L. Rowe & P. C. Gibbons (1962). Discussion. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):57 – 82.score: 30.0
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  22. John Gibbons, Levels.score: 30.0
    Natural realism is the view that there is a real, metaphysical distinction between those properties, perhaps like being a quark, that are natural kinds and those, perhaps like being either red or round that are not. This is a fairly respectable doctrine, though by no means universally accepted. Perhaps slightly less well entrenched is the idea that there is a relation of causal relevance that sometimes holds between a property of a cause and a property of an effect. If causation (...)
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  23. Tim Henning (2010). Kant Und Die Logik des "Ich Denke&Quot;. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 64 (3):331-356.score: 30.0
    This paper explores Kant’s views about the logical form of “I think”-judgments. It is shown that according to Kant, in an important class of cases the prefix “I think” does not contribute to the assertoric, truth-conditional content of judgments of the form “I think that P.” Thus, judgments of this type are often merely judgments that P. The prefix “I think” does mention the subject and his thought, but it does not make the complex judgment a judgment about the subject (...)
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  24. John Gibbons (1993). Identity Without Supervenience. Philosophical Studies 70 (1):59-79.score: 30.0
  25. Tom H. Gibbons (1981). Cubism and 'the Fourth Dimension' in the Context of the Late Nineteenth-Century and Early Twentieth-Century Revival of Occult Idealism. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 44:130-147.score: 30.0
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  26. John Gibbons (2001). Externalism and Knowledge of the Attitudes. Philosophical Quarterly 51 (202):13-28.score: 30.0
    Knowledge of your own propositional attitudes requires at least two things. You need to know the content of the relevant mental state, and you need to know what attitude you take towards that content. If it is possible to mistake a wish for a belief, this is a mistake about the attitude, not the content. One need not believe that we are generally infallible about our mental states to hold that, typically, when I sincerely say..
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  27. Michael Gibbons (ed.) (1994). The New Production of Knowledge: The Dynamics of Science and Research in Contemporary Societies. Sage Publications.score: 30.0
    As we approach the end of the twentieth century, the ways in which knowledge--scientific, social, and cultural--is produced are undergoing fundamental changes. In The New Production of Knowledge, a distinguished group of authors analyze these changes as marking the transition from established institutions, disciplines, practices, and policies to a new mode of knowledge production. Identifying such elements as reflexivity, transdisciplinarity, and heterogeneity within this new mode, the authors consider their impact and interplay with the role of knowledge in social relations. (...)
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  28. Brian G. Henning (2009). Trusting in the 'Efficacy of Beauty': A Kalocentric Approach to Moral Philosophy. Ethics and the Environment 14 (1):pp. 101-128.score: 30.0
    Although debates over carbon taxes and trading schemes, over carbon offsets and compact fluorescents are important, our efforts to address the environmental challenges that we face will fall short unless and until we also set about the difficult work of reconceiving who we are and how we are related to our processive cosmos. What is needed, I argue, are new ways of thinking and acting grounded in new ways of understanding ourselves and our relationship to the world, ways of understanding (...)
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  29. John Gibbons (1996). Externalism and Knowledge of Content. Philsophical Review 105 (3):287-310.score: 30.0
    Many bclicvc that content cxtcrnalism is inconsistent with commonscnsc views about our kmowlcdgc of thc contents of our own thoughts} Content cxtcrnalism is thc vicw that thc propositional contents of an individual’s thoughts do not supcrvcnc on thc intrinsic properties of that individual. Relations bctwccn you and your social and physical environment partly dctcrminc thc comtents of your thoughts.? But if what dctcrmimcs thc content of your thoughts lics partly outside your mind, it might sccm that you have to investigate (...)
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  30. Michelle G. Gibbons (2012). Reassessing Discovery: Rosalind Franklin, Scientific Visualization, and the Structure of DNA. Philosophy of Science 79 (1):63-80.score: 30.0
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  31. Tim Henning (2013). Knowledge, Safety, and Practical Reasoning. In Tim Henning & David P. Schweikard (eds.), Knowledge, Virtue, and Action: Putting Epistemic Virtues to Work. Routledge.score: 30.0
  32. Andrew Gibbons (2010). Nietzsche, Ethics and Education: An Account of Difference – by P. Fitzsimons. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (1):142-145.score: 30.0
  33. Hugh Gibbons (1984). Justifying Law: An Explanation of the Deep Structure of American Law. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 3 (2):165 - 279.score: 30.0
    Charles Darwin argued that human beings are what happen whenphysical laws act upon a planet with the characteristics that earthhad five billion years ago. Similarly, I have argued that theprimacy of individual will is what eventually happens when asociety allocates and limits coercion based upon rights. From timeto time particular visions of the good or the right dominate publicbehavior, but they are eventually enframed by rights — the authoritative claim of each person to respect.I have argued that the propositional structure (...)
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  34. Tim Henning (2012). Strukturelle Entfremdung als Kategorie der Wirtschaftsethik. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 60 (2):213-226.score: 30.0
    This paper argues that a certain kind of alienation from labour can be analyzed and explained in the theoretical framework that is dominant in current economics. Given a neoclassical model of a labour market, the intrinsic value that different kinds of labour may have for people can be represented as a source of utility (in the technical sense). It can then be shown that in capitalist economies, basing one’s supply decisions on this intrinsic value is predictably costly. So in the (...)
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  35. Tim Henning (2008). Review of A. W. Price, Contextuality in Practical Reason. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (9).score: 30.0
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  36. Tim Henning & David P. Schweikard (eds.) (2013). Knowledge, Virtue, and Action: Putting Epistemic Virtues to Work. Routledge.score: 30.0
    This volume brings together recent work by leading and up-and-coming philosophers on the topic of virtue epistemology. The prospects of virtue-theoretic analyses of knowledge depend crucially on our ability to give some independent account of what epistemic virtues are and what they are for . The contributions here ask how epistemic virtues matter apart from any narrow concern with defining knowledge; they show how epistemic virtues figure in accounts of various aspects of our lives, with a special emphasis on our (...)
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  37. Brian G. Henning (2007). Representative Democracy: Principles and Genealogy. Review of Metaphysics 61 (1):164-166.score: 30.0
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  38. Tim Henning (2014). Retter-Kinder, Instrumentalisierung und Kants Zweckformel. Ethik in der Medizin 26 (3):195-209.score: 30.0
    Definition of the problem The creation and selection of children as tissue donors is ethically controversial. Critics often appeal to Kant’s Formula of Humanity, i.e. the requirement that people be treated not merely as means but as ends in themselves. As many defenders of the procedure point out, these appeals usually do not explain the sense of the requirement and hence remain obscure. Arguments This article proposes an interpretation of Kant’s principle, and it proposes that two different instrumental stances be (...)
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  39. Susanne W. Gibbons, Michaela Shafer, Edward J. Hickling & Gloria Ramsey (2013). How Do Deployed Health Care Providers Experience Moral Injury? Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 3 (3):247-259.score: 30.0
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  40. Michael T. Gibbons (1991). The Ethic of Postmodernism. Political Theory 19 (1):96-102.score: 30.0
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  41. Brian Henning (2005). Radical Axiology. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 33 (101):42-45.score: 30.0
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  42. Andrew Gibbons (2013). In the Pursuit of Unhappiness: The 'Measuring Up' of Early Childhood Education in a Seamless System. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (5):502-508.score: 30.0
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  43. Andrew Gibbons (2007). Philosophers as Children: Playing with Style in the Philosophy of Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (5):506–518.score: 30.0
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  44. R. Daude, C. Wenk, A. Westerwick, K. Henning & M. Weck (1998). Supporting Skilled Workers at Shopfloor Machine Tools. AI and Society 12 (1-2):29-37.score: 30.0
    The paper describes supportive actions for users of NC machine tools. From the technical point of view, this comprises new input/output media for interaction with the machine as well as new software tools for help systems. From the organisational point of view, concepts for group work are to be supported and a methology for participation of users in the development process is suggested. A software tool for job order planning is presented which combines organisational and technical aspects. One of the (...)
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  45. Graham Bird, Sarah Gibbons, Paul Guyer, Dieter Henrich, Thomas E. Hill, Otfried Hoffe, Marshall Farrier, Hud Hudson, Patricia Kitcher, Susan Neiman, Allen D. Rosen & John H. Zammito (1996). Recent Books on Kant: Kant's Theory of Imagination; Kant and the Experience of Freedom; Aesthetic Judgement and the Moral Image of the World; Dignity and Practical Reason; Immanuel Kant; Kant's Compatibilism; Kant's Transcendental Psychology; The Unity of Reason; Kant's Theory of Justice. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):226.score: 30.0
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  46. Christoph Henning (2012). Allen Buchanan, Beyond Humanity? The Ethics of Biomedical Enhancement. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. 286 Pp. ISBN 978-0-1958781-0, Hardback, £20.00. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 11 (3):395-400.score: 30.0
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  47. Edward B. Henning (1960). Patronage and Style in the Arts: A Suggestion Concerning Their Relations. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 18 (4):464-471.score: 30.0
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  48. Tim Henning (2013). Selektive Reproduktion, ethischer Aktualismus und Moralitat de re. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 67 (1):5-34.score: 30.0
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  49. Tim Henning (2014). Alienation—New Perspectives From Environmental Ethics, Social Philosophy, and Action Theory; an Introduction. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (1):7-11.score: 30.0
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  50. Brian G. Henning & Adam Scarfe (2013). Beyond Mechanism: Putting Life Back Into Biology. Lexington Books.score: 30.0
    Pairing scientists and philosophers together, this book is an exploration of some of the new frontiers in biology (e.g.
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