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  1. Henning Schmidgen (2013). The Materiality of Things? Bruno Latour, Charles Péguy and the History of Science. History of the Human Sciences 26 (1):3-28.
    This article sheds new light on Bruno Latour’s sociology of science and technology by looking at his early study of the French writer, philosopher and editor Charles Péguy (1873–1914). In the early 1970s, Latour engaged in a comparative study of Péguy’s Clio and the four gospels of the New Testament. His 1973 contribution to a Péguy colloquium (published in 1977) offers rich insights into his interest in questions of time, history, tradition and translation. Inspired by Gilles Deleuze’s philosophy of difference, (...)
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  2. Henning Schmidgen (2012). Between the Laboratory and the Museum: Claude Bernard and the Problem of Time. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 35 (1):33-37.
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  3. Henning Schmidgen (2012). Das Konzert der Maschinen Simondons politisches Programm. Zeitschrift für Medien- Und Kulturforschung 2012 (2):117-134.
    Gilbert Simondon's essay Du mode d'existence des objets techniques (1958 [On the mode of being of technical objects]) operates in the transitional space between Heidegger's philosophy of technology and contemporary cybernetics. Furthermore, Simondon outlines an explicitly political program that culminates in the demand to emphasize the status of technical objects in the culture of contemporary society by way of human representatives. The basis for this program is his conception of the technical »thing« as a medium. German Gilbert Simondons Abhandlung Du (...)
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  4. Henning Schmidgen (2012). Inside the Black Box: Simondon's Politics of Technology. Substance 41 (3):16-31.
    In 1923, Paul Valéry created an artificial world of antiquity. In it the sea could wash up things which, because of their brilliance, hardness, and unfamiliar form, interrupted and irritated well-established habits of thought. Nature or art? Given or created? Earthly or heavenly? Eupalinos, the architect, does not find himself in the position to decide. He throws back into the sea the shiny, ball-like thing he had picked up from the shore only seconds before.1 In the 1950s, the situation has (...)
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  5. Henning Schmidgen (2008). Culturing Life: How Cells Became Technologies (Review). [REVIEW] Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (2):312-315.
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  6. Henning Schmidgen (2008). Culturing Life: How Cells Became Technologies (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (2):312-315.
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  7. Henning Schmidgen (2006). The Uncertainty of Philosophical Experiments: Philosophy of Experimental Biology Marcel Weber Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 2005 (358 Pp; $75.00 Hbk; ISBN 0521829453). [REVIEW] Biological Theory 1 (4):434-435.
  8. Henning Schmidgen (2006). The Uncertainty of Philosophical Experiments. Rezension Von: Marcel Weber," The Philosophy of Experimental Biology", Cambrigde: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Biological Theory 1 (4):434-435.
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  9. Henning Schmidgen (2004). Die Geschwindigkeit von Gefühlen und Gedanken. Ntm International Journal of History and Ethics of Natural Sciences, Technology & Medicine 12 (2):100-115.
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  10. Henning Schmidgen (2004). Pictures, Preparations, and Living Processes: The Production of Immediate Visual Perception (Anschauung) in Late-19th-Century Physiology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):477 - 513.
    This paper addresses the visual culture of late-19th-century experimental physiology. Taking the case of Johann Nepomuk Czermak (1828-1873) as a key example, it argues that images played a crucial role in acquiring experimental physiological skills. Czermak, Emil Du Bois-Reymond (1818-1896) and other late-19th-century physiologists sought to present the achievements and perspective of their discipline by way of "immediate visual perception (unmittelbare Anschauung)." However, the images they produced and presented for this purpose were strongly mediated. By means of specifically designed instruments, (...)
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