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  1. Henrik Syse, What is Philosophy? Reflections on Plato and the Voegelin-Strauss Impasse.
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  2. Endre Begby, Gregory M. Reichberg & Henrik Syse (2012). The Ethics of War. Part II: Contemporary Authors and Issues. Philosophy Compass 7 (5):328-347.
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  3. Endre Begby, Gregory Reichberg & Henrik Syse (2012). The Ethics of War. Part I: Historical Trends1. Philosophy Compass 7 (5):316-327.
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  4. Henrik Syse & Martin L. Cook (2012). Editors' Introduction. Journal of Military Ethics 11 (1):1-1.
    Journal of Military Ethics, Volume 11, Issue 4, Page 271-272, December 2012.
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  5. Henrik Syse (2011). Why Responsible Investing?. In. In Wim Vandekerckhove, Jos Leys, Kristian Alm, Bert Scholtens, Silvana Signori & Henry Schäfer (eds.), Responsible Investment in Times of Turmoil. Springer. 211--219.
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  6. Martin Cook & Henrik Syse (2010). What Should We Mean by 'Military Ethics'? Journal of Military Ethics 9 (2):119-122.
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  7. Henrik Syse (2010). A Reading of Plato's Republic. Diametros 23:104-123.
    The just war tradition is often dated back to St. Augustine (354–430), sometimes with the caveat that it has roots back to Augustine’s teacher St. Ambrose (c. 337/40–397), and even to Roman thought, especially Cicero (106–43 BC). Arguably, the lineage can be traced further back, at least to Plato (c. 427–347 BC), whose thought contains a wealth of materials highlighting the importance of virtues in the preparation for and actual use of armed force. Although he wrote no single dialogue with (...)
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  8. Henrik Syse (2010). The Platonic Roots of Just War Doctrine: A Reading of Plato’s Republic. Diametros 23:104-123.
    Plato arguably stands as one of the precursors to what we today know as the Just War Tradition, and he has more to say about ethics and the use of force than what is often acknowledged. In this article I try to show, by analyzing selected passages and perspectives from the Republic, that Plato regards the role of military ethics as crucial in the construction of the ideal city, and he sees limitation of brutality and more generally a philosophical approach (...)
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  9. Henrik Syse & Martin Cook (2010). New Editors' Introduction. Journal of Military Ethics 9 (1):1-2.
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  10. Henrik Syse (2007). Natural Law, Religion, and Rights: An Exploration of the Relationship Between Natural Law and Natural Rights, with Special Emphasis on the Teachings of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. St. Augustine's Press.
    The Euthyphro problem and the natural law : an investigation of some aspects of the medieval debate on natural law -- Aristotle : natural law and man in the "metaxy" -- St. Thomas Aquinas : the "lex naturalis" -- Thomas Hobbes : The state of nature and natural rights -- John Locke : natural law, natural rights and God -- Concluding remarks and a heavenly dialogue.
     
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  11. Gregory Reichberg & Henrik Syse (2006). Thucydides, Civil War, and Military Ethics. Journal of Military Ethics 5 (4):241-242.
  12. Gregory Reichberg, Henrik Syse & Endre Begby (eds.) (2006). The Ethics of War: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Blackwell.
    This volume offers a collection of texts by ancient, medieval, and modern thinkers.
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  13. Henrik Syse (2006). Plato, Thucydides, and the Education of Alcibiades. Journal of Military Ethics 5 (4):290-302.
  14. Henrik Syse (2006). Afterword: Ethics Across the Border. In Torkel Brekke (ed.), The Ethics of War in Asian Civilizations: A Comparative Perspective. Routledge. 201--205.
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  15. Helene Ingierd & Henrik Syse (2005). Responsibility and Culpability in War. Journal of Military Ethics 4 (2):85-99.
    This article furnishes a philosophical background for the current debate about responsibility and culpability for war crimes by referring to ideas from three important just war thinkers: Augustine, Francisco de Vitoria, and Michael Walzer. It combines lessons from these three thinkers with perspectives on current problems in the ethics of war, distinguishes between legal culpability, moral culpability, and moral responsibility, and stresses that even lower-ranking soldiers must in many cases assume moral responsibility for their acts, even though they are part (...)
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  16. Gregory Reichberg & Henrik Syse (2004). Special Issue on 'Ethics and International Law'. Journal of Military Ethics 3 (2):79-81.
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  17. Henrik Syse (2003). Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan (1651). In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Blackwell Pub.. 234.
     
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  18. Henrik Syse (2003). The Right of Nature and the Problem of Civil War. In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Blackwell Pub.. 234.
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  19. Henrik Syse (2002). Plato: The Necessity of War, the Quest for Peace. Journal of Military Ethics 1 (1):36-44.
    Although Plato writes less about war than we might expect--especially considering the fact that his dialogues are historically set during the Peloponnesian War--the right conduct of war constitutes a crucial concern for Plato. In both the Alcibiades and Laches dialogues, rightful conduct of war is linked to the practice of virtue. Neither a good statesman nor a good military man can ignore this link, which joins military pursuits not only to courage, but to the whole of virtue, including justice. In (...)
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  20. Henrik Syse (2000). Augustinian “History” and the Road to Peace. Augustinian Studies 31 (2):225-239.
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