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  1. Anna Buchheim, Roberto Viviani & Henrik Walter (2013). Attachment Narratives in Depression A Neurocognitive Approach. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    Attachment is the way we relate to others. The way we attach to others is developed early in childhood, can be impaired by early traumatic life events, and is disturbed in many psychiatric disorders. Here we give a short overview about attachment patterns in psychiatric disorders with a focus on depression, and discuss two recent empirical studies of our own that have investigated attachment related brain activation using fMRI. In the first study with patients with borderline personality disorder we used (...)
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  2. Jana Holtmann, Maike C. Herbort, Torsten Wüstenberg, Joram Soch, Sylvia Richter, Henrik Walter, Stefan Roepke & Björn H. Schott (2013). Trait Anxiety Modulates Fronto-Limbic Processing of Emotional Interference in Borderline Personality Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
    Previous studies of cognitive alterations in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) have yielded conflicting results. Given that a core feature of BPD is affective instability, which is characterized by emotional hyperreactivity and deficits in emotion regulation, it seems conceivable that short-lasting emotional distress might exert temporary detrimental effects on cognitive performance. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate how task-irrelevant emotional stimuli (fearful faces) affect performance and fronto-limbic neural activity patterns during attention-demanding cognitive processing in 16 female, unmedicated (...)
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  3. Henrik Walter (2013). The Third Wave of Biological Psychiatry. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    In this article I will argue that we are witnessing at this moment the third wave of biological psychiatry. This framework conceptualizes mental disorders as brain disorders of a special kind that requires a multilevel approach ranging from genes to psychosocial mechanisms. In contrast to earlier biological psychiatry approaches the mental plays a more prominent role in the third wave. This will become apparent by discussing the recent controversy evolving around the recently published DSM-5 and the competing transdiagnostic Research Domain (...)
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  4. Ullrich Wagner, Lisa Handke, Denise Dörfel & Henrik Walter (2012). An Experimental Decision-Making Paradigm to Distinguish Guilt and Regret and Their Self-Regulating Function Via Loss Averse Choice Behavior. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
    Both guilt and regret typically result from counterfactual evaluations of personal choices that caused a negative outcome and are thought to regulate human decisions by people’s motivation to avoid these emotions. Despite these similarities, studies asking people to describe typical situations of guilt and regret identified the social dimension as a fundamental distinguishing factor, showing that guilt but not regret specifically occurs for choices in interpersonal (social) contexts. However, an experimental paradigm to investigate this distinction systematically by inducing emotions of (...)
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  5. Henrik Walter (2012). Author Reply: Empathy and the Brain: How We Can Make Progress. Emotion Review 4 (1):22-23.
    Neuroscientific research on empathy has made much progress recently. How far can we get and how should we do it? Two different routes have been suggested by Dziobek and Jacobs in their commentaries. The first is becoming ecologically more valid by using real-life settings as stimuli. The second is becoming more quantitative by specifying a neurocognitive model, allowing more precise quantitative predictions. Although neither approaches are mutually exclusive, I suggest that these two routes are in a certain tension to each (...)
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  6. Henrik Walter (2012). Social Cognitive Neuroscience of Empathy: Concepts, Circuits, and Genes. Emotion Review 4 (1):9-17.
    This article reviews concepts of, as well as neurocognitive and genetic studies on, empathy. Whereas cognitive empathy can be equated with affective theory of mind, that is, with mentalizing the emotions of others, affective empathy is about sharing emotions with others. The neural circuits underlying different forms of empathy do overlap but also involve rather specific brain areas for cognitive (ventromedial prefrontal cortex) and affective (anterior insula, midcingulate cortex, and possibly inferior frontal gyrus) empathy. Furthermore, behavioral and imaging genetic studies (...)
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  7. Sarah Zweynert, Jan Philipp Pade, Torsten Wüstenberg, Philipp Sterzer, Henrik Walter, Constanze I. Seidenbecher, Alan Richardson-Klavehn, Emrah Düzel & Björn H. Schott (2011). Motivational Salience Modulates Hippocampal Repetition Suppression and Functional Connectivity in Humans. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:144.
    Repetition suppression (RS) is a rapid decrease of stimulus-related neuronal responses upon repeated presentation of a stimulus. Previous studies have demonstrated that negative emotional salience of stimuli enhances RS. It is, however, unclear how motivational salience of stimuli, such as reward-predicting value, influences RS for complex visual stimuli, and which brain regions might show differences in RS for reward-predicting and neutral stimuli. Here we investigated the influence of motivational salience on RS of complex scenes using event-related fMRI. Thirty young healthy (...)
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  8. Sabine Müller & Henrik Walter (2010). Reviewing Autonomy: Implications of the Neurosciences and the Free Will Debate for the Principle of Respect for the Patient's Autonomy. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (02):205-.
    Beauchamp and Childress have performed a great service by strengthening the principle of respect for the patient's autonomy against the paternalism that dominated medicine until at least the 1970s. Nevertheless, we think that the concept of autonomy should be elaborated further. We suggest such an elaboration built on recent developments within the neurosciences and the free will debate. The reason for this suggestion is at least twofold: First, Beauchamp and Childress neglect some important elements of autonomy. Second, neuroscience itself needs (...)
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  9. Henrik Walter (2004). Neurophilosophy of Moral Responsibility. Philosophical Topics 32 (1/2):477-503.
  10. Henrik Walter, Markus Kiefer & Susanne Erk (2003). Content, Context and Cognitive Style in Mood–Memory Interactions. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (10):433-434.
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  11. Henrik Walter & Manfred Spitzer (2003). The Cognitive Neuroscience of Agency in Schizophrenia. In Tilo Kircher & Anthony S. David (eds.), The Self in Neuroscience and Psychiatry. Cambridge University Press. 436.
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  12. Henrik Walter (2002). Neurophilosophy of Free Will. In Robert H. Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook on Free Will. Oxford University Press.
  13. Henrik Walter (2001). Neurophilosophy of Free Will. MIT Press.
  14. Henrik Walter (1997). Authentische Entscheidungen und emotive Neurowissenschaft. Philosophia Naturalis 34 (1):147-174.
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  15. Henrik Walter (1996). Die Freiheit des Deterministen. Chaos und Neurophilosophie. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 50 (3):364 - 385.
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