Search results for 'Henry A. Mess' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Henry A. Mess (1943). Chance, Free Will and the Social Sciences. Philosophy 18 (71):231 - 239.score: 290.0
  2. O. de Selincourt (1941). Social Groups in Modern England. By Henry A. Mess, B.A., Ph.D. (London: Nelson & Sons. 1940. Pp. 168. Price 2s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 16 (61):108-.score: 90.0
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  3. O. de Selincourt (1943). Social Structure. By Henry A. Mess, B.A., Ph.D. (London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd. Pp. 130. Price 6s. Net.)The Elements of Sociology. By F. J. Wright, M.Sc.(Econ.). (University of London Press, Ltd. Pp. 217. Price 6s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 18 (71):274-.score: 90.0
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  4. Karim Jamal (2004). After Seven Decades of Regulation, Why is the Audit Profession in Such a Mess? Business and Professional Ethics Journal 23 (1/2):65-92.score: 42.0
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  5. John T. Platt (1974). Alphabet Soups or a Mess of Pottage? Foundations of Language 11 (2):295-297.score: 42.0
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  6. H. P. Rickman (1991). Making a Mess of Kant. Philosophy and Literature 15 (2):278-285.score: 42.0
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  7. Peter A. Facione (1990). Thirty Great Ways to Mess Up a Critical Thinking Test. Informal Logic 12 (2).score: 39.0
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  8. Debra Nails (1997). Tidying the Socratic Mess of a Method. Southwest Philosophy Review 13 (2):1-14.score: 36.0
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  9. H. Hamner Hill (1992). A Thirty-First Way to Mess Up a Critical Thinking Test: A Critical Response to Facione. Informal Logic 14 (2).score: 36.0
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  10. Leif Joslyn (1995). We Are Getting Into a Fine Mess. Bioscience 45 (5):306-307.score: 36.0
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  11. Nils A. Baas (2009). Extended Memory Evolutive Systems in a Hyperstructure Context. Axiomathes 19 (2):215-221.score: 24.0
    This paper is just a comment to the impressive work by A. C. Ehresmann and J.-P. Vanbremeersch on the theory of Memory Evolutive Systems (MES). MES are truly higher order systems. Hyperstructures represent a new concept which I introduced in order to capture the essence of what a higher order structure is—encompassing hierarchies and emergence. Hyperstructures are motivated by cobordism theory in topology and higher category theory. The morphism concept is replaced by the concept of a bond. In the paper (...)
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  12. David Kirsh (2000). A Few Thoughts on Cognitive Overload. Intellectica 1 (30):19-51.score: 23.0
    This article addresses three main questions: What causes cognitive overload in the workplace? What analytical framework should be used to understand how agents interact with their work environments? How can environments be restructured to improve the cognitive workflow of agents? Four primary causes of overload are identified: too much tasking and interruption, and inadequate workplace infrastructure to help reduce the need for planning, monitoring, reminding, reclassifying information, etc… The first step in reducing the cognitive impact of these causes is to (...)
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  13. Jonathan L. Kvanvig (2005). On Denying a Presupposition of Sellars' Problem:A Defense of Propositionalism. Veritas 50 (4):173-190.score: 23.0
    There is a great divide between two approaches to epistemology over the past thirty to forty years. Some label the divide that between internalists and externalists, and that characterization may be accurate on some account of the distinction. I will pursue the divide from a different direction, in part because the literature on the distinction between internalism and externalism has become a mess, and I don’t want to clean up the mess here.
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  14. David Hershenov (2005). Do Dead Bodies Pose a Problem for Biological Approaches to Personal Identity? Mind 114 (453):31 - 59.score: 21.0
    Part of the appeal of the biological approach to personal identity is that it does not have to countenance spatially coincident entities. But if the termination thesis is correct and the organism ceases to exist at death, then it appears that the corpse is a dead body that earlier was a living body and distinct from but spatially coincident with the organism. If the organism is identified with the body, then the unwelcome spatial coincidence could perhaps be avoided. It is (...)
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  15. Jeremy Bentham (1891/2001). A Fragment on Government. Lawbook Exchange.score: 21.0
    This volume makes available one of the central texts in the development of utilitarian tradition, in the authoritative 1977 edition prepared by Professors Burns and Hart as part of Bentham's Collected Works. Certain that history was on his side, Bentham sought to rid the world of the hideous mess wrought by legal obfuscation and confusion, and to transform politics into a rational, scientific activity, premised on the fundamental axiom that "it is the greatest happiness of the greatest number that (...)
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  16. Robert Fulghum (1988/1990). All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten: The Essay That Became a Classic. Villard Books.score: 21.0
    Most of what I really need to know about how to live and what to do and how to be I learned in kindergarten. Wisdom was not at the top of the graduate school mountain, but there in the sandpile at Sunday School. These are the things I learned: Share everything. Play fair. Don't hit people. Put things back where you found them. Clean up your own mess. Don't take things that aren't yours. Say you're sorry when you hurt (...)
     
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  17. Peter Goldie (2012). The Inner Mess. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    Peter Goldie explores the ways in which we think about our lives--our past, present, and future--in narrative terms. The notion of narrative is highly topical, and highly contentious, in a wide range of fields including philosophy, psychology and psychoanalysis, historical studies, and literature. The Mess Inside engages with all of these areas of discourse, and steers a path between the sceptics who are dismissive of the idea of narrative as having any worthwhile use at all, and those who argue (...)
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  18. Nathaniel A. Rivers, Marc C. Santos & Ryan P. Weber (2009). Productive Mess: First-Year Composition Takes the University's Agonism Online. Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy 13 (2):n2.score: 15.0
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  19. Jonathan Kvanvig (2007). Two Approaches to Epistemic Defeat. In Deane-Peter Baker (ed.), Alvin Plantinga. Cambridge University Press. 107-124.score: 14.0
    There are two different kinds of theories of the concept of epistemic defeat. One theory begins with propositional relationships, only by implication describing what happens in the context of a noetic system. Such a theory places inforrmation about defeat up front, not informing us of how the defeat relationships play out in the context of actual belief, at least not initially. The other theory takes a back door to the concept of defeat, assuming a context of (...)
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  20. John Worrall (2010). Evidence: Philosophy of Science Meets Medicine. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):356-362.score: 14.0
    Obviously medicine should be evidence-based. The issues lie in the details: what exactly counts as evidence? Do certain kinds of evidence carry more weight than others? (And if so why?) And how exactly should medicine be based on evidence? When it comes to these details, the evidence-based medicine (EBM) movement has got itself into a mess – or so it will be argued. In order to start to resolve (...)
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  21. Herman Tennesen (1960). Vindication of the Humpty Dumpty Attitude Towards Language. Inquiry 3 (1-4):185 – 198.score: 14.0
    Effective objective (sachlich) verbal communication is dependent upon the use of linguistic locutions which are: a) suitable for some special purposes, b) clear ( i.e ., having a satsifactorily high degree of subsumability), and c) in accordance with some ordinary (i.e. , frequently occurring) language usages. Only in so far as point c is concerned is a study of actual language usage of (indirect) value to philosophers. And this holds true regardless of whether one's underlying assumption tends towards the view: (...)
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  22. Hanne Andersen (2013). The Second Essential Tension: On Tradition and Innovation in Interdisciplinary Research. Topoi 32 (1):3-8.score: 14.0
    In his analysis of “the essential tension between tradition and innovation” Thomas S. Kuhn focused on the apparent paradox that, on the one hand, normal research is a highly convergent activity based upon a settled consensus, but, on the other hand, the ultimate effect of this tradition-bound work has invariably been to change the tradition. Kuhn argued that, on the one hand, without the possibility of divergent thought, fundamental innovation would be precluded. On the other hand, without a strong emphasis (...)
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  23. Charles Pigden, ANNEX 3: Russell's Humean Wobble: Human Society in Ethics and Politics.score: 14.0
    Russell’s Human Society is a fun book to read, but meta-ethically it is a bit of a mess. There is much wit and some wisdom, though both the wit and the wisdom are more conspicuous when he is discussing human nature and human society than when he is discussing the finer points of ethical theory. (I particularly like his frequent complaints that human behavior seldom rises to the level of enlightened self-interest. If only we could manage to be intelligently (...)
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  24. Hugh V. McLachlan (2010). Abortion and Dawkins' Fallacious Account of the So-Called 'Great Beethoven Fallacy'. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 15 (2):44-54.score: 12.0
    In his discussion of ethics and abortion, Prof. Richard Dawkins makes the provocative claim that: ‘The Great Beethoven Fallacy is a typ ical example of the kind of logical mess we get into when our minds are befuddled by religiously inspired absolutism.’ (Dawkins, p. 339) This supposed fallacy is presented as if it exemplified not only a particular view of abortion held, for instance, by certain fundamentalist Christians but as if it revealed some flaw that is characteristic of the (...)
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  25. Carmelo Marabello & Martino Doni (2009). On The (Double) Bind of Representation: From Gregory Bateson to Wim Wenders. World Futures 65 (8):596-604.score: 12.0
    What follows is the elaboration of a series of discussions held by the two authors at a seminar during which we tried to “read” Wim Wenders's Lisbon Story starting from Gregory Bateson's double bind theory. These discussions then developed into writings that were intertwined, hybridized, corrected, extended, and cut. We experimented directly with the game of relationships, the “mess that works” of the difficult distinction between map and territory, between epistemology and cinematography. Emerging from general considerations on cinema is (...)
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  26. Oscar Vilarroya (2001). From Functional Mess to Bounded Functionality. Minds and Machines 11 (2):239-256.score: 12.0
    Some evolutionary psychologists contend that the best way to discover the functions of our present psychological systems is by appealing to the notion of functional mesh, that is, the assumed tight fit between a trait's design and the adaptive problem it is supposed to solve. In this paper, I argue that there exist theoretical considerations and empirical evidence that undermine this assumption of optimal design. Instead, I suggest that cognitive systems are constrained by what I call bounded functionality. This proposal (...)
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  27. James Franklin (2005). Probability Theory: The Logic of Science. [REVIEW] Mathematical Intelligencer 27 (2):83-85.score: 12.0
    A standard view of probability and statistics centers on distributions and hypothesis testing. To solve a real problem, say in the spread of disease, one chooses a “model”, a distribution or process that is believed from tradition or intuition to be appropriate to the class of problems in question. One uses data to estimate the parameters of the model, and then delivers the resulting exactly specified model to the customer for use in prediction and classification. As a gateway to these (...)
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  28. Nigel J. T. Thomas (1994). The Imagery Debate. [REVIEW] Journal of Mind and Behavior 15:291-294.score: 12.0
    This book is a philosopher's examination of the dispute, which raged amongst cognitive psychologists in the 1970s, and has continued to sputter on since, about the nature of mental imagery. As Tye sees things (and, indeed, as the textbooks generally have it) on the one side of the issue we find Stephen Kosslyn and certain close associates, arguing that mental images are best understood on analogy with pictures; and on the other side we find Zenon Pylyshyn, ably seconded by Geoffrey (...)
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  29. Peter Goldie (2012). The Mess Inside: Narrative, Emotion, and the Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    Narrative thinking -- Narrative thinking about one's past -- Grief : a case study -- Narrative thinking about one's future -- Self-forgiveness : a case study -- The narrative sense of self -- Narrative, truth, life, and fiction.
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  30. Ben Woodard (2010). Mad Speculation and Absolute Inhumanism: Lovecraft, Ligotti, and the Weirding of Philosophy. Continent 1 (1):3-13.score: 12.0
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 3-13. / 0/ – Introduction I want to propose, as a trajectory into the philosophically weird, an absurd theoretical claim and pursue it, or perhaps more accurately, construct it as I point to it, collecting the ground work behind me like the Perpetual Train from China Mieville's Iron Council which puts down track as it moves reclaiming it along the way. The strange trajectory is the following: Kant's critical philosophy and much of continental philosophy which has followed, (...)
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  31. Philip Beineke & Christopher Manning, An Exploration of Sentiment Summarization.score: 12.0
    The website Rotten Tomatoes, located at www.rottentomatoes.com, is primarily an online repository of movie reviews. For each movie review document, the site provides a link to the full review, along with a brief description of its sentiment. The description consists of a rating (“fresh” or “rotten”) and a short quotation from the review. Other research (Pang, Lee, & Vaithyanathan 2002) has predicted a movie review’s rating from its text. In this paper, we focus on the quotation, which is a main (...)
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  32. Arne De Boever (2012). Losing Face: Francis Bacon's 25th Hour. Film-Philosophy 16 (1):85-100.score: 12.0
    Spike Lee’s film 25 th Hour begins with an act of violence that it does not show: instead, the viewer hears the sounds of a dog being beaten. The dog’s menacing growl is then transformed into the growling image of Montgomery ‘Monty’ Brogan’s car speeding through New York. Monty spots the dog, and stops. It is only then that the viewer witnesses the results of the film’s ‘foundational’ act of violence: the bloody body of a dog beaten to pulp. When (...)
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  33. Giles Fraser (2008). No Laughing Matter. The Philosophers' Magazine 42 (42):90-92.score: 12.0
    Much of the spirit of the Enlightenment was critical and sceptical, concerned with the limits of what can be known. But in taking a more positivist turn the Enlightenment inspired grand palaces of thought where human mess was forever being tidied away. The novel, by contrast, is supremely the place where human mess is celebrated.
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  34. P. Bernard (1998). Quadrata Confessio: Les Messes de Mone Et la Récitation du Credo à la Messe Dans la Gaule de l'Antiquité Tardive. Revue des Sciences Philosophiques Et Théologiques 82 (3):431-443.score: 12.0
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  35. James Borders (2013). Ritva Maria Jacobsson, Fêtes des Saints Et de la Croix Et de la Transfiguration, 2 Vols. A: Introduction Et Commentaires, B: Édition. (Tropes du Propre de la Messe 5; Corpus Troporum 10.) Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2011. Pp. 1212; B&W Figs. And Maps. 396.44 Kr. ISBN: 9789186071547. [REVIEW] Speculum 88 (1):313-314.score: 12.0
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  36. W. F. Bynum (1984). Charles Lyell's "Antiquity of Man" and Its Critics. Journal of the History of Biology 17 (2):153 - 187.score: 12.0
    It should be clear that Lyell's scientific contemporaries would hardly have agreed with Robert Munro's remark that Antiquity of Man created a full-fledged discipline. Only later historians have judged the work a synthesis; those closer to the discoveries and events saw it as a compilation — perhaps a “capital compilation,”95 but a compilation none the less. Its heterogeneity made it difficult to judge as a unity, and most reviewers, like Forbes, concentrated on the first part of Lyell's trilogy. The chapters (...)
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  37. Robert Fulghum (1993). All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten: Uncommon Thoughts on Common Things. Fawcett Columbine.score: 12.0
    Most of what I really need to know about how to live and what to do and how to be I learned in kindergarten. Wisdom was not at the top of the graduate school mountain, but there in the sandpile at Sunday School. These are the things I learned: Share everything. Play fair. Don't hit people. Put things back where you found them. Clean up your own mess. Don't take things that aren't yours. Say you're sorry when you hurt (...)
     
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  38. Alastair Hannay (2010). The Religious Stance. The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):60-61.score: 12.0
    How we share the world, what conceptual framework might allow us to grasp the sharing, once the bleak world-in-itself is unavailable and all we have are our personalised worlds, remains a total mystery. Science can get along quite well without solving it, but cosmologists need to take it seriously. For philosophers, however, that the world we take for granted is a conceptual mess poses a problem.
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  39. Feliz Molina (2013). Readymades in the Social Sphere: An Interview with Daniel Peltz. Continent 3 (1):17-24.score: 12.0
    Since 2008 I have been closely following the conceptual/performance/video work of Daniel Peltz. Gently rendered through media installation, ethnographic, and performance strategies, Peltz’s work reverently and warmly engages the inner workings of social systems, leaving elegant rips and tears in any given socio/cultural quilt. He engages readymades (of social and media constructions) and uses what are identified as interruptionist/interventionist strategies to disrupt parts of an existing social system, thus allowing for something other to emerge. Like the stereoscope that requires two (...)
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  40. Peter A. Ubel (2005). Commentary : How Did We Get Into This Mess? In Don A. Moore (ed.), Conflicts of Interest: Challenges and Solutions in Business, Law, Medicine, and Public Policy. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  41. Peter A. Ubel (2005). How Did We Get Into This Mess? In Don A. Moore (ed.), Conflicts of Interest: Challenges and Solutions in Business, Law, Medicine, and Public Policy. Cambridge University Press. 142.score: 12.0
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  42. Guy Vanhoomissen (2005). Une Messe sans paroles de consécration? A propos de la validité de l'Anaphore d'Addaï et Mari. Nouvelle Revue Théologique 127 (1).score: 12.0
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  43. Margriet Vos (1974). A la Recherche de Normes Pour les Textes Liturgiques de la Messe (Ve-VIIe Siècle). Revue d'Histoire Ecclésiastique 69:5-37.score: 12.0
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  44. A. Hurst (2010). Complexity and the Idea of Human Development. South African Journal of Philosophy 29 (3).score: 5.0
    Reflecting on ‘human development’ theorists face conceptual confusion, borne out experientially by contemporary ecological, social, and economic crises. Since concepts create realities (i.e. justify and motivate practices), and philosophers create concepts, it is important to consider how philosophers might respond to conceptual difficulties caused by the modern era’s still influential ‘binary’ paradigm, exemplified by the law of the excluded middle, which entails a discursive split between modernism’s ultimately predictable cosmos and postmodernism’s insistence on fundamental chaos. Supposedly obliged to choose between (...)
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  45. Byron A. Campbell & Rita B. Messing (1969). Aversion Thresholds and Aversion Difference Limens for White Light in Albino and Hooded Rats. Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (2):353.score: 4.7
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  46. Iain Law, Evil Pleasure is Good for You!score: 4.0
    Many people are uncomfortable with the idea that pleasure from certain sources is genuinely beneficial. These sources can be sorted into two classes: ones that involve others’ pain; and ones that involve what seems to be damage rather than benefit to the person involved. Here’s an example of the latter: a woman who claims that she enjoys her work performing in hard-core pornographic films. Some find it hard to take such a claim at face value – they instinctively assume that (...)
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  47. Jonathan B. King (1993). Learning to Solve the Right Problems: The Case of Nuclear Power in America. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (2):105 - 116.score: 4.0
    Three general types of problems entail different strategies. Continuing to seek solutions to tame problems when we face messes, let alone wicked problems, is potentially catastrophic hence fundamentally irresponsible. In our turbulent times, it is therefore becoming a strategic necessity to learn how to solve the right problems. Successful problem solving requires finding the right solution to the right problem. We fail more often because we solve the wrong problem than because we get the wrong solution to the right problem. (...)
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  48. B. A. G. Fuller (1949). The Messes Animals Make in Metaphysics. Journal of Philosophy 46 (26):829-838.score: 4.0
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  49. Karen Stohr (2009). Minding Others' Business. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (1):116-139.score: 4.0
    What do we do when a loved one is seriously messing up her life? While Kantianism describes the predicament nicely as a tension between love and respect, it is not well-suited to resolving it. Kantian respect prevents minding another’s business in cases where love demands it. Virtue ethics can readily explain the predicament as a tension between the virtues of sympathy and humility. Moreover, by changing the focus away from the other as a setter of ends and toward the would-be-benefactor’s (...)
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