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  1. Henry E. Allison (2012). Essays on Kant. Oxford University Press.
    This volume presents seventeen essays by one of the world's leading scholars on Kant. Henry E. Allison explores the nature of transcendental idealism, freedom of the will, and the concept of the purposiveness of nature. He places Kant's views in their historical context and explores their contemporary relevance to present day philosophers.
     
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  2. Henry E. Allison (2011). Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals: A Commentary. OUP Oxford.
    Henry E. Allison presents a comprehensive commentary on Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals (1785). It differs from most recent commentaries in paying special attention to the structure of the work, the historical context in which it was written, and the views to which Kant was responding. Allison argues that, despite its relative brevity, the Groundwork is the single most important work in modern moral philosophy and that its significance lies mainly in two closely related factors. The first is (...)
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  3. Henry E. Allison (2008). Custom and Reason in Hume: A Kantian Reading of the First Book of the Treatise. Oxford University Press.
    So considered, Hume is viewed as a naturalist, whose project in the first three parts of the first book of the Treatise is to provide an account of the ...
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  4. Henry E. Allison (2008). &Quot;whatever Begins to Exist Must Have a Cause of Existence&Quot;: Hume's Analysis and Kant's Response. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):525–546.
  5. Henry E. Allison, John Anderson, Creagh McLean Cole, John Beversluis & James Robert Brown (2008). Appearance in This List Neither Guarantees nor Precludes a Future Review of the Book. Mind 117:468.
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  6. Henry E. Allison (2007). Comments on Guyer. Inquiry 50 (5):480 – 488.
    Guyer argues for four major theses. First, in his early, pre-critical discussions of morality, Kant advocated a version of rational egoism, in which freedom, understood naturalistically as a freedom from domination by both one's own inclinations and from other people, rather than happiness, is the fundamental value. From this point of view, the function of the moral law is to prescribe rules best suited to the preservation and maximization of such freedom, just as on the traditional eudaemonistic account it is (...)
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  7. Allen Wood, Paul Guyer & Henry E. Allison (2007). Debating Allison on Transcendental Idealism. Kantian Review 12 (2):1-39.
  8. Henry E. Allison (2006). Kant on Freedom of the Will. In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant and Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 381--415.
     
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  9. Henry E. Allison (2006). Transcendental Realism, Empirical Realism and Transcendental Idealism. Kantian Review 11 (1):1-28.
    This essay argues that the key to understanding Kant's transcendental idealism is to understand the transcendental realism with which he contrasts it. It maintains that the latter is not to be identified with a particular metaphysical thesis, but with the assumption that the proper objects of human cognitions are “objects in general” or “as such,” that is, objects considered simply qua objects of some understanding. Since this appears to conflict with Kant's own characterization of transcendental realism as the view that (...)
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  10. Paul Guyer & Henry E. Allison (2006). Dialogue: Paul Guyer and Henry Allison on Allison's Kant's Theory of Taste. In Rebecca Kukla (ed.), Aesthetics and Cognition in Kant's Critical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
  11. Henry E. Allison (2005). Hume's Philosophical Insouciance. Hume Studies 31 (2):317-346.
    This paper argues that Hume’s central concern in T 1.4.7 is to find a way to rely upon his cognitive faculties in spite of what he has learned about them in the preceding sections of part 4. The trouble is that having identified the understanding with “the general and more establish’d properties of the imagination” (T 1.4.7.6; SBN 267), Hume finds that these properties cannot function apart from other “seemingly trivial” ones, which calls into question the trustworthiness of his cognitive (...)
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  12. Henry E. Allison (2005). Hume's Philosophical Insouciance: A Reading of Treatise 1.4. 7. Hume Studies 31 (2):317-346.
    This paper argues that Hume’s central concern in T 1.4.7 is to find a way to rely upon his cognitive faculties in spite of what he has learned about them in the preceding sections of part 4. The trouble is that having identified the understanding with "the general and more establish'd properties of the imagination" (T 1.4.7.6; SBN 267), Hume finds that these properties cannot function apart from other "seemingly trivial" ones, which calls into question the trustworthiness of his cognitive (...)
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  13. Henry E. Allison (2004). Kant's Transcendental Idealism. Yale University Press.
    This landmark book is now reissued in a new edition that has been vastly rewritten and updated to respond to recent Kantian literature.
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  14. Henry E. Allison (2003). Reflective Judgment and the Application of Logic to Nature: Kant's Deduction of the Principle of Purposiveness as an Answer to Hume. In Hans-Johann Glock (ed.), Strawson and Kant. Oxford University Press.
  15. Henry E. Allison (2003). Reply to the Comments of Longuenesse and Ginsborg. Inquiry 46 (2):182 – 194.
    In this discussion I respond to some of the criticisms raised by Béatrice Longuenesse and Hannah Ginsborg to my account of Kant's aesthetic theory presents in Kant's Theory of Taste.
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  16. Paul Guyer, Nick Zangwill, Christopher Janaway, Anthony Savile, Eva Schaper, Malcolm Budd, Donald W. Crawford, Brigitte Sassen, Lambert Zuidevaart, Jane Kneller, Peter McLaughlin & Henry E. Allison (2003). Kant's Critique of the Power of Judgment: Critical Essays. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
     
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  17. Henry E. Allison (2002). On the Very Idea of a Propensity to Evil. Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (2-3):337-348.
  18. Henry E. Allison (2001). Ethics, Evil, and Anthropology in Kant: Remarks on Allen Wood's "Kant's Ethical Thought&Quot;. [REVIEW] Ethics 111 (3):594-613.
  19. Henry E. Allison (2001). Kant's Theory of Taste: A Reading of the Critique of Aesthetic Judgment. Cambridge University Press.
    This book constitutes one of the most important contributions to recent Kant scholarship. In it, one of the pre-eminent interpreters of Kant, Henry Allison, offers a comprehensive, systematic, and philosophically astute account of all aspects of Kant's views on aesthetics. The first part of the book analyses Kant's conception of reflective judgment and its connections with both empirical knowledge and judgments of taste. The second and third parts treat two questions that Allison insists must be kept distinct: the normativity of (...)
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  20. Henry E. Allison (2001). Ethics, Evil, and Anthropology in Kant: Remarks on Allen Wood's. Ethics 111 (3):594-613.
  21. Henry E. Allison (2000). Kant's Conception of Enlightenment. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 7:35-44.
    Kant’s views on enlightenment are best known through his essay, “What is Enlightenment?” This is, however, merely the first of a series of reflections on the subject contained in the Kantian corpus. In what follows, I shall attempt to provide an overview of the Kantian conception of enlightenment. My major concern is to show that Kant had a complex and nuanced conception of enlightenment, one which is closely connected to some of his deepest philosophical commitments, and is as distinct from (...)
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  22. Henry E. Allison (2000). Where Have All the Categories Gone? Reflections on Longuenesse's Reading of Kant's Transcendental Deduction. Inquiry 43 (1):67 – 80.
    This paper contains a critical analysis of the interpretation of Kant's second edition version of the Transcendental Deduction offered by Béatrice Longuenesse in her recent book: Kant and the Capacity to Judge. Though agreeing with much of Longuenesse's analysis of the logical function of judgment, I question the way in which she tends to assign them the objectifying role traditionally given to the categories. More particularly, by way of defending my own interpretation of the Deduction against some of her criticisms, (...)
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  23. Henry E. Allison (1999). Kant. In Ted Honderich (ed.), The Philosophers: Introducing Great Western Thinkers. Oup Oxford.
     
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  24. Henry E. Allison (1998). Das Medusenhaupt der Kritik, Kantstudien Ergänzungshefte 128 (review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (4):632-634.
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  25. Henry E. Allison (1997). Beauty and Duty in Kant's Critique of Judgement. Kantian Review 1:53-81.
  26. Henry E. Allison (1997). We Can Act Only Under the Idea of Freedom. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 71 (2):39 - 50.
  27. Michael Friedman, Stanley Cavell & Henry E. Allison (1997). Presidential Addresses of the American Philosophical Association. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 71 (2):5-21.
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  28. Henry E. Allison (1996). Idealism and Freedom: Essays on Kant's Theoretical and Practical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Henry Allison is one of the foremost interpreters of the philosophy of Kant. This new volume collects all his recent essays on Kant's theoretical and practical philosophy. All the essays postdate Allison's two major books on Kant (Kant's Transcendental Idealism, 1983, and Kant's Theory of Freedom, 1990), and together they constitute an attempt to respond to critics and to clarify, develop and apply some of the central theses of those books. Two are published here for the first time. Special features (...)
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  29. Henry E. Allison (1996). Review of Kant's Compatibilism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 105 (1).
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  30. Henry E. Allison (1996). Review: Hudson, Kant's Compatibilism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 105 (1):125-127.
  31. Henry E. Allison (1995). On Naturalizing Kant's Transcendental Psychology. Dialectica 49 (2‐4):335-356.
  32. Henry E. Allison (1995). Reflections on the Banality of (Radical) Evil. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 18 (2):141-158.
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  33. Henry E. Allison (1993). Apperception and Analyticity in the B-Deduction. Grazer Philosophische Studien 44:233-252.
    This paper defends the thesis of the analyticity of the principle of apperception, as developed in the first part of the B-Deduction, against recent criticisms by Paul Guyer and Patricia Kitchen The first part presents these criticisms, the most important of which being that the analyticity thesis is incompatible with both the avowed goal of which being that the Deduction of establishing the validity of the categories and Üie account of apperception in the A-Deduction. The second part argues that Kant's (...)
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  34. Henry E. Allison (1993). Kant on Freedom: A Reply to My Critics. Inquiry 36 (4):443 – 464.
    The first two sections of this paper are devoted respectively to the criticisms of my views raised by Stephen Engstrom and Andrews Reath at a symposium on Kant's Theory of Freedom held in Washington D.C. on 28 December 1992 under the auspices of the North American Kant Society. The third section contains my response to the remarks of Marcia Baron at a second symposium in Chicago on 24 April 1993 at the APA Western Division meetings. The fourth section deals with (...)
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  35. Henry E. Allison (1992). Gurwitsch's Interpretation of Kant, Reflections of a Former Student. Kant-Studien 83 (2):208-221.
     
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  36. Henry E. Allison (1992). Kant's Antinomy of Teleological Judgment. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (S1):25-42.
  37. Henry E. Allison (1992). Spinoza and the Philosophy of Immanence: Reflections on Yovel's the Adventures of Immanence. Inquiry 35 (1):55 – 67.
    This essay examines the main line of argument of Yirmiyahu Yovel's The Adventures of Immanence. Expressing general agreement with Yovel's central thesis that Spinoza's ?immanent revolution? marked an important tuming?point in the history of modernity and profoundly influenced subsequent thought, I none the less take issue with some of the details of the story. In particular, I question his omission of Lessing, his account of the relationship between Spinoza and Kant, and his treatment of Marx. In a final section I (...)
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  38. Henry E. Allison (1991). On a Presumed Gap in the Derivation of the Categorical Imperative. Philosophical Topics 19 (1):1-15.
  39. Henry E. Allison (1990). Kant's Theory of Freedom. Cambridge University Press.
    In his new book the eminent Kant scholar Henry Allison provides an innovative and comprehensive interpretation of Kant's concept of freedom. The author analyzes the concept and discusses the role it plays in Kant's moral philosophy and psychology. He also considers in full detail the critical literature on the subject from Kant's own time to the present day. In the first part Professor Allison argues that at the center of the Critique of Pure Reason there is the foundation for a (...)
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  40. Henry E. Allison (1989). Kant's Refutation of Materialism. The Monist 72 (2):190-208.
  41. Henry E. Allison (1987). Reflections on the B-Deduction. Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (S1):1-15.
  42. Henry E. Allison (1986). Morality and Freedom: Kant's Reciprocity Thesis. Philosophical Review 95 (3):393-425.
  43. Henry E. Allison (1986). The Concept of Freedom in Kant's “Semi-Critical” Ethics. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 68 (1):96-115.
  44. Henry E. Allison (1984). Incongruence and Ideality. Topoi 3 (2):169-175.
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  45. Henry E. Allison (1982). Practical and Transcendental Freedom in the Critique of Pure Reason. Kant-Studien 73 (1-4):271-290.
  46. Henry E. Allison (1981). Transcendental Schematism and The Problem of the Synthetic A Priori. Dialectica 35 (1):57-83.
  47. Henry E. Allison (1980). Kant's Critique of Spinoza. In Richard Kennington (ed.), The Philosophy of Baruch Spinoza. Catholic University of America Press. 199--277.
  48. Henry E. Allison (1976). Kant's Refutation of Realism. Dialectica 30 (2‐3):223-253.
  49. Henry E. Allison (1976). The Non-Spatiality of Things in Themselves for Kant. Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (3):313-321.
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  50. Henry E. Allison (1975). The Critique of Pure Reason as Transcendental Phenomenology. In Don Ihde & Richard M. Zaner (eds.), Dialogues in Phenomenology. Martinus Nijhoff. 136--155.
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