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Henry E. Allison [80]Henry Edward Allison [1]
  1.  93
    Henry E. Allison (2004). Kant's Transcendental Idealism. Yale University Press.
    This landmark book is now reissued in a new edition that has been vastly rewritten and updated to respond to recent Kantian literature.
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  2. Henry E. Allison (1990). Kant's Theory of Freedom. Cambridge University Press.
    In his new book the eminent Kant scholar Henry Allison provides an innovative and comprehensive interpretation of Kant's concept of freedom. The author analyzes the concept and discusses the role it plays in Kant's moral philosophy and psychology. He also considers in full detail the critical literature on the subject from Kant's own time to the present day. In the first part Professor Allison argues that at the center of the Critique of Pure Reason there is the foundation for a (...)
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  3. Henry E. Allison (1996). Idealism and Freedom: Essays on Kant's Theoretical and Practical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Henry Allison is one of the foremost interpreters of the philosophy of Kant. This new volume collects all his recent essays on Kant's theoretical and practical philosophy. All the essays postdate Allison's two major books on Kant (Kant's Transcendental Idealism, 1983, and Kant's Theory of Freedom, 1990), and together they constitute an attempt to respond to critics and to clarify, develop and apply some of the central theses of those books. Two are published here for the first time. Special features (...)
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  4. Michael Friedman, Stanley Cavell & Henry E. Allison (1997). Presidential Addresses of the American Philosophical Association. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 71 (2):5-21.
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  5. Henry E. Allison (2001). Kant's Theory of Taste: A Reading of the Critique of Aesthetic Judgment. Cambridge University Press.
    This book constitutes one of the most important contributions to recent Kant scholarship. In it, one of the pre-eminent interpreters of Kant, Henry Allison, offers a comprehensive, systematic, and philosophically astute account of all aspects of Kant's views on aesthetics. The first part of the book analyses Kant's conception of reflective judgment and its connections with both empirical knowledge and judgments of taste. The second and third parts treat two questions that Allison insists must be kept distinct: the normativity of (...)
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  6. Henry E. Allison (2006). Transcendental Realism, Empirical Realism and Transcendental Idealism. Kantian Review 11 (1):1-28.
    This essay argues that the key to understanding Kant's transcendental idealism is to understand the transcendental realism with which he contrasts it. It maintains that the latter is not to be identified with a particular metaphysical thesis, but with the assumption that the proper objects of human cognitions are “objects in general” or “as such,” that is, objects considered simply qua objects of some understanding. Since this appears to conflict with Kant's own characterization of transcendental realism as the view that (...)
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  7. Allen W. Wood, Paul Guyer & Henry E. Allison (2007). Debating Allison on Transcendental Idealism. Kantian Review 12 (2):1-39.
    People talk about rats deserting a sinking ship, but they don't usually ask where the rats go. Perhaps this is only because the answer is so obvious: of course, most of the rats climb aboard the sounder ships, the ships that ride high in the water despite being laden with rich cargoes of cheese and grain and other things rats love, the ships that bring prosperity to ports like eighteenth-century Königsberg and firms such as Green & Motherby. By making the (...)
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  8.  8
    Henry E. Allison (1985). Kant's Transcendental Idealism: An Interpretation and Defense. Philosophical Review 94 (1):134-136.
  9.  78
    Henry E. Allison (1992). Kant's Antinomy of Teleological Judgment. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (S1):25-42.
  10. Henry E. Allison (2000). Where Have All the Categories Gone? Reflections on Longuenesse's Reading of Kant's Transcendental Deduction. Inquiry 43 (1):67 – 80.
    This paper contains a critical analysis of the interpretation of Kant's second edition version of the Transcendental Deduction offered by Béatrice Longuenesse in her recent book: Kant and the Capacity to Judge. Though agreeing with much of Longuenesse's analysis of the logical function of judgment, I question the way in which she tends to assign them the objectifying role traditionally given to the categories. More particularly, by way of defending my own interpretation of the Deduction against some of her criticisms, (...)
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  11. Henry E. Allison (1976). The Non-Spatiality of Things in Themselves for Kant. Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (3):313-321.
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  12. Henry E. Allison (1973). Kant's Critique of Berkeley. Journal of the History of Philosophy 11 (1):43.
  13.  31
    Henry E. Allison (2005). Hume's Philosophical Insouciance: A Reading of Treatise 1.4. 7. Hume Studies 31 (2):317-346.
    This paper argues that Hume’s central concern in T 1.4.7 is to find a way to rely upon his cognitive faculties in spite of what he has learned about them in the preceding sections of part 4. The trouble is that having identified the understanding with "the general and more establish'd properties of the imagination" (T 1.4.7.6; SBN 267), Hume finds that these properties cannot function apart from other "seemingly trivial" ones, which calls into question the trustworthiness of his cognitive (...)
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  14. Henry E. Allison (2008). 'Whatever Begins to Exist Must Have a Cause of Existence': Hume's Analysis and Kant's Response. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):525–546.
  15.  71
    Henry E. Allison (1968). Kant's Concept of the Transcendental Object. Kant-Studien 59 (1-4):165-186.
  16.  60
    Henry E. Allison (2011). Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals: A Commentary. OUP Oxford.
    Henry E. Allison presents a comprehensive commentary on Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals . Allison pays special attention to the structure of the work and its historical and intellectual context. He argues that, despite its relative brevity, the Groundwork is the single most important work in modern moral philosophy.
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  17. Henry E. Allison (1986). Morality and Freedom: Kant's Reciprocity Thesis. Philosophical Review 95 (3):393-425.
  18.  61
    Henry E. Allison (2008). Custom and Reason in Hume: A Kantian Reading of the First Book of the Treatise. Oxford University Press.
    So considered, Hume is viewed as a naturalist, whose project in the first three parts of the first book of the Treatise is to provide an account of the ...
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  19.  87
    Henry E. Allison (2007). Comments on Guyer. Inquiry 50 (5):480 – 488.
    Guyer argues for four major theses. First, in his early, pre-critical discussions of morality, Kant advocated a version of rational egoism, in which freedom, understood naturalistically as a freedom from domination by both one's own inclinations and from other people, rather than happiness, is the fundamental value. From this point of view, the function of the moral law is to prescribe rules best suited to the preservation and maximization of such freedom, just as on the traditional eudaemonistic account it is (...)
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  20.  58
    Henry E. Allison (1991). On a Presumed Gap in the Derivation of the Categorical Imperative. Philosophical Topics 19 (1):1-15.
  21.  7
    Henry E. Allison (1990). Benedict de Spinoza: An Introduction. Philosophical Review 99 (1):114-116.
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  22.  30
    Henry E. Allison (1981). Transcendental Schematism and The Problem of the Synthetic A Priori. Dialectica 35 (1):57-83.
    SummaryThe paper is concerned with the connection between Kant's conception of transcendental schematism and his analysis of the conditions of the possibility of synthetic a priori judgments. After dealing with some of the standard objections to Kant's theory, I argue that transcendental schemata must be construed as pure intuitions. I then point out that the Principles of Pure Understanding are a set of synthetic a priori judgments which assert the function of the various schemata as necessary conditions of the possibility (...)
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  23.  21
    Henry E. Allison (2002). On the Very Idea of a Propensity to Evil. Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (2-3):337-348.
  24.  21
    Henry E. Allison (2001). Ethics, Evil, and Anthropology in Kant: Remarks on Allen Wood's. Ethics 111 (3):594-613.
  25.  51
    Henry E. Allison (1989). Kant's Refutation of Materialism. The Monist 72 (2):190-208.
  26.  7
    R. W. K. Paterson & Henry E. Allison (1975). The Kant-Eberhard Controversy. Philosophical Quarterly 25 (100):277.
  27.  29
    Henry E. Allison (1997). Beauty and Duty in Kant's Critique of Judgement. Kantian Review 1 (1):53-81.
    At the end of §40 of the Critique of Judgement, after a discussion of the sensus communis and its connection with taste, Kant writes:If we could assume that the mere universal communicability as such of our feeling must already carry with it an interest for us , then we could explain how it is that we require from everyone as a duty, as it were , the feeling in a judgment of taste.
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  28.  52
    Henry E. Allison (2000). Kant's Conception of Enlightenment. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 7:35-44.
    Kant’s views on enlightenment are best known through his essay, “What is Enlightenment?” This is, however, merely the first of a series of reflections on the subject contained in the Kantian corpus. In what follows, I shall attempt to provide an overview of the Kantian conception of enlightenment. My major concern is to show that Kant had a complex and nuanced conception of enlightenment, one which is closely connected to some of his deepest philosophical commitments, and is as distinct from (...)
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  29.  32
    Henry E. Allison (1993). Apperception and Analyticity in the B-Deduction. Grazer Philosophische Studien 44:233-252.
    This paper defends the thesis of the analyticity of the principle of apperception, as developed in the first part of the B-Deduction, against recent criticisms by Paul Guyer and Patricia Kitchen The first part presents these criticisms, the most important of which being that the analyticity thesis is incompatible with both the avowed goal of which being that the Deduction of establishing the validity of the categories and Üie account of apperception in the A-Deduction. The second part argues that Kant's (...)
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  30.  48
    Henry E. Allison (1987). Reflections on the B-Deduction. Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (S1):1-15.
  31.  55
    Henry E. Allison (1993). Kant on Freedom: A Reply to My Critics. Inquiry 36 (4):443 – 464.
    The first two sections of this paper are devoted respectively to the criticisms of my views raised by Stephen Engstrom and Andrews Reath at a symposium on Kant's Theory of Freedom held in Washington D.C. on 28 December 1992 under the auspices of the North American Kant Society. The third section contains my response to the remarks of Marcia Baron at a second symposium in Chicago on 24 April 1993 at the APA Western Division meetings. The fourth section deals with (...)
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  32.  35
    Henry E. Allison (1997). We Can Act Only Under the Idea of Freedom. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 71 (2):39 - 50.
  33.  12
    Henry E. Allison (2013). The Singleness of the Categorical Imperative. In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter 37-54.
  34.  17
    Henry E. Allison (1995). On Naturalizing Kant's Transcendental Psychology. Dialectica 49 (2‐4):335-356.
  35.  53
    Henry E. Allison (2003). Reply to the Comments of Longuenesse and Ginsborg. Inquiry 46 (2):182 – 194.
    In this discussion I respond to some of the criticisms raised by Béatrice Longuenesse and Hannah Ginsborg to my account of Kant's aesthetic theory presents in Kant's Theory of Taste.
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  36.  55
    Henry E. Allison (2001). Ethics, Evil, and Anthropology in Kant: Remarks on Allen Wood's "Kant's Ethical Thought". [REVIEW] Ethics 111 (3):594-613.
  37.  35
    Henry E. Allison (1982). Practical and Transcendental Freedom in the Critique of Pure Reason. Kant-Studien 73 (1-4):271-290.
  38. Henry E. Allison (2003). Reflective Judgment and the Application of Logic to Nature: Kant's Deduction of the Principle of Purposiveness as an Answer to Hume. In Hans-Johann Glock (ed.), Strawson and Kant. Oxford University Press
  39.  47
    Henry E. Allison (1992). Spinoza and the Philosophy of Immanence: Reflections on Yovel's the Adventures of Immanence. Inquiry 35 (1):55 – 67.
    This essay examines the main line of argument of Yirmiyahu Yovel's The Adventures of Immanence. Expressing general agreement with Yovel's central thesis that Spinoza's ?immanent revolution? marked an important tuming?point in the history of modernity and profoundly influenced subsequent thought, I none the less take issue with some of the details of the story. In particular, I question his omission of Lessing, his account of the relationship between Spinoza and Kant, and his treatment of Marx. In a final section I (...)
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  40. Paul Guyer & Henry E. Allison (2006). Dialogue: Paul Guyer and Henry Allison on Allison's Kant's Theory of Taste. In Rebecca Kukla (ed.), Aesthetics and Cognition in Kant's Critical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press
  41.  15
    Henry E. Allison (1976). Kant's Refutation of Realism. Dialectica 30 (2‐3):223-253.
    SummaryThis paper attempts to develop an interpretation of Kant's transcendental idealism which is based upon his critique of transcendental realism . It is argued that given Kant's transcendental distinction, all non‐ or pre‐critical philosophies, even Berkeleian phenomenalism are transcendentally realistic. This paradoxical result is used as the basis for an analysis of Kant's resolution of the mathematical antinomies, wherein this resolution is seen both as an “indirect proof” of transcendental idealism and as a refutation of transcendental realism. Finally, it is (...)
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  42.  33
    Henry E. Allison (1967). Christianity and Nonsense. Review of Metaphysics 20 (3):432 - 460.
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  43.  7
    Henry E. Allison (1996). Kant’s Compatibilism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 105 (1):125-127.
  44. Paul Guyer, Nick Zangwill, Christopher Janaway, Anthony Savile, Eva Schaper, Malcolm Budd, Donald W. Crawford, Brigitte Sassen, Lambert Zuidevaart, Jane Kneller, Peter McLaughlin & Henry E. Allison (2003). Kant's Critique of the Power of Judgment: Critical Essays. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Includes twelve of the most important modern critical discussions of the Critique of the Power of Judgment, written by the leading Kant scholars and aestheticians of the twentieth century.
     
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  45. Henry E. Allison (2006). Kant on Freedom of the Will. In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant and Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press 381--415.
     
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  46.  3
    Henry E. Allison (1966). Locke's Theory of Personal Identity: A Re-Examination. Journal of the History of Ideas 27 (1):41.
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  47.  23
    Henry E. Allison (1971). Kant's Transcendental Humanism. The Monist 55 (2):182-207.
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  48.  24
    Henry E. Allison (1995). Reflections on the Banality of (Radical) Evil. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 18 (2):141-158.
  49.  40
    Henry E. Allison (1984). Incongruence and Ideality. Topoi 3 (2):169-175.
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  50.  23
    Henry E. Allison (1986). The Concept of Freedom in Kant's “Semi-Critical” Ethics. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 68 (1):96-115.
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