17 found
Sort by:
  1. Henry Pietersma (2006). What Happened to Epistemology In Our Tradititon? Review of Metaphysics 59 (3):553 - 576.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Henry Pietersma (2002). Donn Welton, The Other Husserl: The Horizons of Transcendental Phenomenology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 22 (5):381-383.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Henry Pietersma (2000). Phenomenological Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    This work offers a provocative new historical and systematic interpretation of the epistemological doctrines of three twentieth-century giants: Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. Pietersma argues that these three philosophers, while connected by their phenomenological doctrines, have underappreciated and interestingly-linked views on the theory of knowledge.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Henry Pietersma (1990). Knowledge and Being in Merleau-Ponty. Man and World 23 (2):205-223.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Henry Pietersma (ed.) (1989). Merleau Ponty: Critical Essays. Center for Advanced Research in Phenomenology.
  6. Henry Pietersma (ed.) (1989). Merleau-Ponty: Critical Essays. University Press of America.
  7. Henry Pietersma (1989). Truth and the Evident. In William R. McKenna & J. N. Mohanty (eds.), Husserl's Phenomenology: A Textbook. University Press of America. 213--248.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Henry Pietersma (1989). The Problem of Knowledge and Phenomenology. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (1):27-47.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Henry Pietersma (1988). Merleau-Ponty and Spinoza. International Studies in Philosophy 20 (3):89-93.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Henry Pietersma (1988). Seppo Sajama and Matti Kamppinen, A Historical Introduction to Phenomenology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 8 (5):188-190.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Henry Pietersma (1987). A Critique of Two Recent Husserl Interpretations. Dialogue 26 (04):695-.
  12. Henry Pietersma (1987). Intentionality and Epistemic Appraisal. Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (3):381-394.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Henry Pietersma (1986). Husserl's Concept of Existence. Synthese 66 (2):311 - 328.
  14. Henry Pietersma (1979). The Phenomenological Reduction: Some Remarks on Its Role in Philosophy. American Philosophical Quarterly 16 (1):37 - 44.
    The paper begins with a characterization of its methodological point designed to bring out those features that would recommend it to philosophers. The concept of this method is emphatically distinguished from the scope given to it by philosophers who actually use it. Husserl, For instance, Held that all philosophical questions are accessible by this method of reduction. In the last part of the paper I am suggesting that there is a legitimate form of skepticism which husserl's position fails to recognize.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Henry Pietersma (1978). Brentano's Concept of the Evident. Analecta Husserliana 7:235-244.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Henry Pietersma (1973). Intuition and Horizon in the Philosophy of Husserl. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 34 (1):95-101.
    The notion of "seeing the object itself," basic in husserl's theory of knowledge, Can only make sense, If we interpret it with the help of his notion of horizon or implicit context. Seeing the object itself is an achievement experienced as such. This must mean that the subject has an implicit awareness of a context of other possible epistemic situations in which what is now "seen" or viewed "close up" can be referred to from a "distance." "distance" is here of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Henry Pietersma (1967). Husserl and Frege. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 49 (3):298-323.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation