Search results for 'Herbert Blumer' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Herbert Blumer (ed.) (2000). Selected Works of Herbert Blumer: A Public Philosophy for Mass Society. University of Illinois Press.score: 2040.0
    The civic sociology of Herbert Blumer speaks to the fundamental problem of modernity: how freedom and equity can be ensured when institutional and personal ...
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  2. Martyn Hammersley (2010). The Case of the Disappearing Dilemma: Herbert Blumer on Sociological Method. History of the Human Sciences 23 (5):70-90.score: 180.0
    Herbert Blumer was a key figure in what came to be identified as the Chicago School of Sociology. He invented the term ‘symbolic interactionism’ as a label for a theoretical approach that derived primarily from the work of John Dewey, George Herbert Mead and Charles Cooley. But his most influential work was methodological in character, and he is generally viewed today as a prominent critic of positivism, and of the growing dominance of quantitative method within US sociology. (...)
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  3. I. Hanzel (2011). Beyond Blumer and Symbolic Interactionism: The Qualitative-Quantitative Issue in Social Theory and Methodology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (3):303-326.score: 60.0
    The article analysis the views approaching quantitative and qualitative methods in social sciences as separable or irreconcilable. First, we characterize these views and show how they deal with this divide and how they view the aspects of the latter. Next, we identify the works of Herbert Blumer as the basis of that divide and subject them to an analysis. Finally, by means of categories like quantity, quality, and measure, we show that the qualitative-quantitative divide is based on a (...)
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  4. Michael Herbert (2006). Ethical Responses to Drug Abuse. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 11 (4):4.score: 60.0
    Herbert, Michael The World Health Organization and the UN reports indicate the need of an integrated approach to tackle the dependence on legal psychoactive substances, such as tobacco and alcohol, as well as illegal ones. The effective clinical and societal responses to the existence of substance misuse are discussed, suggesting that realistic, timely investment, influenced by the best scientific evidence indicating what works, for whom, under what circumstances, and an increased degree of collaboration within and between governments and their (...)
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  5. Michael Herbert (2006). Drugs: Mode of Action, Prevalence and Reasons for Use. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 11 (3):4.score: 60.0
    Herbert, Michael Several children are experiencing behavioural and psychological problems at a younger age, due to the harms inflicted by illicit drug use. Professor Patrick McGorry of Orygen Youth Health, an organisation helping teenagers with mental health problems, believes that many young people experiment with drugs recreationally and for fun, but the situation gets worse once it becomes necessary as a relief from their problems.
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  6. Michael Herbert (2005). Post-Coma Unresponsiveness. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 11 (1):7.score: 60.0
    Herbert, Michael Clinicians are beginning to understand the varied outcomes following severe brain injury, one of which is post-coma unresponsiveness (PCU). However, much still needs to be done to fully comprehend this elusive state. Current clinical knowledge is outlined below.
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  7. Lonnie Athens (2009). The Roots of “Radical Interactionism”. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 39 (4):387-414.score: 60.0
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  8. Michael Herbert (2005). Indigenous Health. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 11 (2):9.score: 60.0
    Herbert, Michael Indigenous health is everybody's responsibility. This is true from the national policy level, to state governments and clinics on the ground. Whichever way a particular health issue is approached, and new perspectives are certainly needed, the bottom line is that the determinants of health always reflect back to the living conditions, education, past injustices, and socioeconomic circumstances of the Aboriginal population.
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  9. Robert T. Herbert (1998). Dualism/Materialism. Philosophical Quarterly 48 (191):159-75.score: 30.0
    I argue that in rejecting Cartesian ‘mind’ and retaining Cartesian ‘body’, materialism/physicalism falls to the allure of three charming but deadly ‘eliminative’ identities: perceivable properties become particles in motion; perception, by being ‘sensationized’, turns into neuronal activity; and a perceiver becomes a brain in a body. In rebuttal I argue that ‘particles in motion’ does not nullify but instead preserves the perceivable properties it seeks to explain; ‘neuronal activity’ is not a reduction of, but is doubtlessly necessary to, perception; and (...)
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  10. Scott R. Harris (2000). The Social Construction of Equality in Everyday Life. Human Studies 23 (4):371-393.score: 30.0
    This article proposes "equality" as a topic for interactionist research. By drawing on the perspectives of Herbert Blumer, Alfred Schutz, and Harold Garfinkel, an attempt is made to lay the theoretical groundwork for studying the interpretive and experiential aspects of equality. Blumer's fundamental premises of symbolic interactionism, Schutz's analysis of relevance and typification, and Garfinkel's treatment of reflexivity and indexicality are explicated and applied to the subject of equality. I then draw upon the moral theory of John (...)
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  11. Mohd Faizal Musa (2013). Axiology of Pilgrimage. Cultura 10 (1):67-84.score: 30.0
    The religious rites of Shia remain a mystery to Malaysia’s Sunnite majority. One such rite is the ziyarat (visits to sacred sites). This essay highlights the ritualsconducted and performed by Malaysian Shi’ites during their seasonal pilgrimage to Iran and Iraq. Their rituals and behaviors during these pilgrimages to holy shrines in Iran and Iraq were documented from the standpoint of a cultural anthropologist. Rites from two sites, Mashad and Karbala, are presented in this study. Applying Herbert Blumer’s symbolic (...)
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  12. N. Herbert (1993). Elemental Mind: Human Consciousness and the New Physics. Dutton.score: 30.0
  13. Urs Staheli (2012). Infrastrukturen des Kollektiven: alte Medien neue Kollektive? Zeitschrift für Medien- Und Kulturforschung 2012 (2):99-116.score: 30.0
    Although it is central to the social sciences, the notion of the collective has been elaborated primarily in fields of study which are concerned with deviant behavior, and then only in the sense of »collective behavior.« In order to consider the emergence of collectivity, the present paper suggests a re-reading of this sociology (especially of Herbert Blumer). By means of a reading of Walt Whitman, who was important as a lyrical and journalistic source of inspiration to early American (...)
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  14. Kevin S. Decker (2008). The Evolution of the Psychical Element: George Herbert Mead at the University of Chicago: Lecture Notes by H. Heath Bawden 1899–1900: Introduction. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (3):pp. 469-479.score: 24.0
    George Herbert Mead's early lectures at the University of Chicago are more important to understanding the genesis of his views in social psychology than some commentators, such as Hans Joas, have emphasized. Mead's lecture series "The Evolution of the Psychical Element," preserved through the notes of student H. Heath Bawden, demonstrate his devotion to Hegelianism as a method of thinking and how this influenced his non-reductionistic approach to functional psychology. In addition, Mead's breadth of historical knowledge as well as (...)
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  15. Piers J. Hale (2003). Labor and the Human Relationship with Nature: The Naturalization of Politics in the Work of Thomas Henry Huxley, Herbert George Wells, and William Morris. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 36 (2):249 - 284.score: 24.0
    Historically labor has been central to human interactions with the environment, yet environmentalists pay it scant attention. Indeed, they have been critical of those who foreground labor in their politics, socialists in particular. However, environmentalists have found the nineteenth-century socialist William Morris appealing despite the fact that he wrote extensively on labor. This paper considers the place of labor in the relationship between humanity and the natural world in the work of Morris and two of his contemporaries, the eminent scientist (...)
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  16. Ana Laura Colombo de Freitas & Cida Golin (2012). Os movimentos da indústria fonográfica na crítica jornalística: a contribuição de Herbert Caro, vendedor das coisas do espírito. Logos 18 (2).score: 24.0
    O artigo busca pistas da história da fonografia no Brasil a partir da coluna Os melhores discos clássicos do crítico alemão naturalizado brasileiro Herbert Caro no jornal Correio do Povo, RS, entre 1967 e 1980. Caro entendia a reprodutibilidade técnica como estratégia de difusão musical e formação de público. Mediador e orientador do consumo, acompanhou a oscilação da indústria fonográfica no Brasil, fomentou a escuta de gravações e propagou critérios de escolha e compra de discos.
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  17. John Dewey (1931). George Herbert Mead. Journal of Philosophy 28 (12):309-314.score: 21.0
    This article contains John Dewey's remarks given at the funeral of G.H. Mead in Chicago in 1931.
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  18. John Dewey (1904). The Philosophical Work of Herbert Spencer. Philosophical Review 13 (2):159-175.score: 21.0
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  19. Naomi Beck (2005). Enrico Ferri's Scientific Socialism: A Marxist Interpretation of Herbert Spencer's Organic Analogy. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (2):301 - 325.score: 21.0
    Spencer's evolutionary philosophy is usually identified with right-wing doctrines such as individualism, laissez-faire liberalism and even conservatism. Since he himself defended similar positions, it is perhaps not surprising that the study of the political interpretations of his ideas has drawn relatively little attention. In this article I propose to examine a rather atypical reading of Spencer's organic analogy, though definitely not a marginal one: Enrico Ferri's Marxist doctrine of Scientific Socialism. Ferri is not a figure unknown to scholars interested in (...)
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  20. Mitchell Aboulafia (2001). The Cosmopolitan Self: George Herbert Mead and Continental Philosophy. Illinois University Press.score: 21.0
  21. Author unknown, Edward Herbert of Cherbury. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 21.0
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  22. Ana Petrov (2012). The Concept of Music Evolution in Herbert Spencer's and Charles Darwin's Theories. Filozofija I Društvo 23 (3):253-273.score: 21.0
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  23. Isabel Loureiro (2011). Herbert Marcuse - anticapitalismo e emancipação. Trans/Form/Ação 28 (2):7-20.score: 21.0
    Marcuse teve no Brasil na década de 1970 uma recepção unilateral, sendo visto unicamente como guru da contra-cultura. Contra esse equívoco o artigo mostra a relação intrínseca entre teoria e prática na filosofia de Marcuse, caracterizada como uma filosofia política cuja preocupação central é a transformação radical da sociedade capitalista.
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  24. Mitchell Aboulafia (ed.) (1991). Philosophy, Social Theory, and the Thought of George Herbert Mead. SUNY Press.score: 21.0
  25. Herbert Marcuse (ed.) (2014). Marxism, Revolution and Utopia: Collected Papers of Herbert Marcuse, Volume Six. Routledge.score: 21.0
    This collection assembles some of Herbert Marcuse’s most important work and presents for the first time his responses to and development of classic Marxist approaches to revolution and utopia, as well as his own theoretical and political perspectives. This sixth and final volume of Marcuse's collected papers shows Marcuse’s rejection of the prevailing twentieth-century Marxist theory and socialist practice - which he saw as inadequate for a thorough critique of Western and Soviet bureaucracy - and the development of his (...)
     
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  26. Herbert Marcuse (2010). Philosophy, Psychoanalysis and Emancipation: Herbert Marcuse Collected Papers, Volume 5. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Edited by Douglas Kellner and Clayton Pierce, Philosophy, Psychoanalysis and Emancipation is the fifth volume of Herbert Marcuse's collected papers. Containing some of Marcuse’s most important work, this book presents for the first time his unique syntheses of philosophy, psychoanalysis, and critical social theory, directed toward human emancipation and social transformation. Within philosophy, Marcuse engaged with disparate and often conflicting philosophical perspectives - ranging from Heidegger and phenomenology, to Hegel, Marx, and Freud - to create unique philosophical insights, often (...)
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  27. Herbert Marcuse (2004). The New Left and the 1960s: Collected Papers of Herbert Marcuse, Volume 3. Routledge.score: 21.0
    The New Left and the 1960s is the third volume of Herbert Marcuse's collected papers. In 1964, Marcuse published a major study of advanced industrial society, One Dimensional Man , which was an important influence on the young radicals who formed the New Left. Marcuse embodied many of the defining political impulses of the New Left in his thought and politics - hence a younger generation of political activists looked up to him for theoretical and political guidance. The material (...)
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  28. Herbert Marcuse (2004). Technology, War and Fascism: Collected Papers of Herbert Marcuse, Volume 1. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Herbert Marcuse is one of the most influential thinkers of our time. Born in Berlin, Marcuse studied philosophy with Husserl and Heidegger at the Universities of Freiburg and Berlin. Marcuse's critical social theory ingeniously fuses phenomenology, Freudian thought and Marxist theory; and provides a solid ground for his reputation as the most crucial figure inspiring the social activism and New Left politics of the 1960s and 1970s. The largely unpublished work collected in this volume makes clear the continuing relevance (...)
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  29. Herbert Spencer (1996). Herbert Spencer: Collected Writings. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Herbert Spencer (1820-1903) was regarded by the Victorians as the foremost philosopher of the age, the prophet of evolution at a time when the idea had gripped the popular imagination. Until recently Spencer's posthumous reputation rested almost excusively on his social and political thought, which has itself frequently been subject to serious misrepresentation. But historians of ideas now recognise that an acquaintance with Spencer's thought is essential for the proper understanding of many aspects of Victorian intellectual life, and the (...)
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  30. Michael Heidelberger (2003). The Mind-Body Problem in the Origin of Logical Empiricism: Herbert Feigl and Psychophysical Parallelism. In Paolo Parrini, Wes Salmon & Merrilee Salmon (eds.), Logical Empiricism: Historical & Contemporary Perspectives. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press. 233--262.score: 18.0
    It is widely held that the current debate on the mind-body problem in analytic philosophy began during the 1950s at two distinct sources: one in America, de- riving from Herbert Feigl's writings, and the other in Australia, related to writings by U. T. Place and J. J. C. Smart (Feigl [1958] 1967). Jaegwon Kim recently wrote that "it was the papers by Smart and Feigl that introduced the mind-body problem as a mainstream metaphysical Problematik of analytical philosophy, and launched (...)
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  31. Mitchell Aboulafia, George Herbert Mead. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 18.0
    George Herbert Mead (1863-1931), American philosopher and social theorist, is often classed with William James, Charles Sanders Peirce, and John Dewey as one of the most significant figures in classical American pragmatism. Dewey referred to Mead as “a seminal mind of the very first order” (Dewey, 1932, xl). Yet by the middle of the twentieth-century, Mead's prestige was greatest outside of professional philosophical circles. He is considered by many to be the father of the school of Symbolic Interactionism in (...)
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  32. Patricia H. Werhane (2000). Business Ethics and the Origins of Contemporary Capitalism: Economics and Ethics in the Work of Adam Smith and Herbert Spencer. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 24 (3):185 - 198.score: 18.0
    Both Adam Smith and Herbert spencer, albeit in quite different ways, have been enormously influential in what we today take to be philosophies of modern capitalism. Surprisingly it is Spencer, not Smith, who is the individualist, perhaps an egoist, and supports a "night watchman" theory of the state. Smith's concept of political economy is a notion that needs to be revisited, and Spencer's theory of democratic workplace management offers a refreshing twist on contemporary libertarianism.
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  33. John Abromeit & W. Mark Cobb (eds.) (2004). Herbert Marcuse: A Critical Reader. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Herbert Marcuse: A Critical Reader is a collection of brand new papers by seventeen Marcuse scholars, which provides a comprehensive reassessment of the relevance of Marcuse's critical theory at the beginning of the 21st century. Although best known for his reputation in critical theory, Herbert Marcuse's work has had impact on areas as diverse as politics, technology, aesthetics, psychoanalysis and ecology. This collection addresses the contemporary relevance of Marcuse's work in this broad variety of fields and from an (...)
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  34. Herbert Hochberg & Kevin Mulligan (2005). Review of Herbert Hochberg, Kevin Mulligan (Eds.), Relations and Predicates. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (10).score: 18.0
    This book is presumably a collection of essays delivered at a conference, though it's hard to say. There is no cover description and the editors' introduction, where this information might have been found, is missing from the volume (at least from my copy) in spite of being listed in the table of contents. A curious editorial slip. In fact, from an editorial perspective this book is a disaster. Not only is the format reminiscent of those camera ready volumes that jammed (...)
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  35. Herbert Marcuse & Phillip Deen (2010). Herbert Marcuse's “Review of John Dewey's Logic: The Theory of Inquiry”. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (2):258-265.score: 18.0
    Dewey’s book is the first systematic attempt at a pragmatistic logic (since the work of Peirce). Because of the ambiguity of the concept of pragmatism, the author rejects the concept in general. But, if one interprets pragmatism correctly, then this book is ‘through and through Pragmatistic’. What he understands as ‘correct’ will become clear in the following account. The book takes its subject matter far beyond the traditional works on logic. It is a material logic first in the sense that (...)
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  36. Alfred Nordmann (2009). Invisible Origins of Nanotechnology: Herbert Gleiter, Materials Science, and Questions of Prestige. Perspectives on Science 17 (2):pp. 123-143.score: 18.0
    Herbert Gleiter promoted the development of nanostructured materials on a variety of levels. In 1981 already, he formulated research visions and produced experimental as well as theoretical results. Still he is known only to a small community of materials scientists. That this is so is itself a telling feature of the imagined community of nanoscale research. After establishing the plausibility of the claim that Herbert Gleiter provided a major impetus, a second step will show just how deeply Gleiter (...)
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  37. Patrick Allo (2006). M. Augier and J. G. March (Eds): Models of a Man: Essays in Memory of Herbert Simon. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 16 (2):221-224.score: 18.0
    Herbert Simon (1916–2001) was definitely 20th century’s most influential proponent of bounded rationality. His work was of a highly philosophical nature, but—as made clear time and again in this book—his ideas did not originate in philosophy at all. If the present collection of essays has any value to the philosophically oriented reader, it lies in the way it shows how a traditionally philosophical topic as human rationality and action cannot be claimed by philosophy alone. Even more, it shows that (...)
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  38. Rodney Fopp (2011). “Repressive Tolerance”: Herbert Marcuse's Exercise in Social Epistemology. Social Epistemology 24 (2):105-122.score: 18.0
    When Herbert Marcuse's essay entitled “Repressive tolerance” was published in the mid-1960s it was trenchantly criticised because it was anti-democratic and defied the academic canon of value neutrality. Yet his argument is attracting renewed interest in the 21st century, particularly when, post 9/11, the thresholds or limits of tolerance are being contested. This article argues that Marcuse's original essay was concerned to problematise the dominant social understandings of tolerance at the time, which were more about insisting that individual citizens (...)
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  39. Robert Dingwall & Michael D. King (1995). Herbert Spencer and the Professions: Occupational Ecology Reconsidered. Sociological Theory 13 (1):14-24.score: 18.0
    Herbert Spencer was the most influential Anglophone sociologist of the nineteenth century, but his contributions are now largely forgotten. It is argued, however, that the clarity of his understanding of the use of biological metaphors in sociology gives his work a power which is worth rediscovering. This proposition is pursued through a discussion of his treatment of the professions and their role in industrial societies. His approach is compared with the "ecological" perspective of sociologists in the Chicago tradition, notably (...)
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  40. Joseph Cunningham (2013). Praxis Exiled: Herbert Marcuse and the One Dimensional University. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (4):537-547.score: 18.0
    Leading Frankfurt School theorist, Herbert Marcuse, possessed an intricate relationship with higher education. As a professor, Marcuse participated in the 1960s student movements, believing that college students had potential as revolutionary subjects. Additionally, Marcuse advocated for a college education empowered by a form of praxis that extended education outside the university into realms of critical thought and action. However, the more pessimistic facet of his theory, best represented in the canonical One Dimensional Man, now seems to be the dominant (...)
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  41. Mie Augier (2000). Models of Herbert A. Simon. Perspectives on Science 8 (4):407-443.score: 18.0
    : The work of Herbert A. Simon has drawn increasing attention from modern scholars who argue that Simon's work changed during the Cold War. This is due to the fact that Simon seemingly changed the substance of his research in the 1950s. This paper argues that Simon did not change in any significant way, but was lead by his interest in decision making and rationality into areas of economics, political science, sociology, psychology, organization theory, and computer science. He used (...)
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  42. Kyle A. Greenwalt (2008). Discursivity, Heteroglossia, and Interest: Revisiting Herbert Kliebard's Dewey. Education and Culture 24 (2):pp. 41-53.score: 18.0
    This paper revisits Herbert Kliebard's figure of John Dewey in Kliebard's The Struggle for the American Curriculum . The paper argues that, while there are indeed reasons for the disembodied picture of Dewey that emerges from Struggle , such figuration ultimately has an effect that is overly reproductive: It ignores Dewey's efforts to live within and across institutional boundaries so as to reconstruct the practices and interests of the society in which he lived. Using the work of Bakhtin and (...)
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  43. Douglas Kellner, Herbert Marcuse.score: 18.0
    Herbert Marcuse gained world renown during the 1960s as a philosopher, social theorist, and political activist, celebrated in the media as "father of the New Left." University professor and author of many books and articles, Marcuse won notoriety when he was perceived as both an influence on and defender of the "New Left" in the United States and Europe. His theory of "onedimensional" society provided critical perspectives on contemporary capitalist and state communist societies and his notion of "the great (...)
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  44. Johann Rossouw (2010). Secularity and Modernity? A Brief Response to Herbert de Vriese. Sophia 49 (3):429-432.score: 18.0
    In this brief response to Herbert De Vriese’s The Charm of Disenchantment, his attempt to link secularism and modernity is questioned. Criticism is leveled at De Vriese’s use of the correspondence between Voltaire and Frederick the Great without reference to the historical context, notably the confessional states that existed between roughly 1650 and 1800 in Europe. De Vriese’s apology for disenchantment and modernity is also questioned in the light of both modern religious and secular responses to modernity as exemplified (...)
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  45. Trevor Pearce (2010). From 'Circumstances' to 'Environment': Herbert Spencer and the Origins of the Idea of Organism–Environment Interaction. Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (3):241-252.score: 18.0
    The word ‘environment’ has a history. Before the mid-nineteenth century, the idea of a singular, abstract entity—the organism—interacting with another singular, abstract entity—the environment—was virtually unknown. In this paper I trace how the idea of a plurality of external conditions or circumstances was replaced by the idea of a singular environment. The central figure behind this shift, at least in Anglo-American intellectual life, was the philosopher Herbert Spencer. I examine Spencer’s work from 1840 to 1855, demonstrating that he was (...)
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  46. Mitchell Aboulafia (1993). Was George Herbert Mead a Feminist? Hypatia 8 (2):145 - 158.score: 18.0
    George Herbert Mead was a dedicated progressive and internationalist who strove to realize his political convictions through participation in numerous civic organizations in Chicago. These convictions informed and were informed by his approach to philosophy. This article addresses the bonds between Mead's philosophy, social psychology, and his support of women's rights through an analysis of a letter he wrote to his daughter-in-law regarding her plans for a career.
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  47. Herbert Spiegelberg (ed.) (1975). Phenomenological Perspectives: Historical and Systematic Essays in Honor of Herbert Spiegelberg. Martinus Nijhoff.score: 18.0
    ... AND INCOMPOSSIBILITY IN LEIBNIZ In a previous article we endeavored to deal with a paradox which seems to arise in Leibnizian philosophy.1 Substances or ...
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  48. George Herbert Mead H. Heath Bawden Kevin S. Decker (2008). The Evolution of the Psychical Element, by George Herbert Mead (Dec. 1899–March 1900 or 1898–1899). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (3):pp. 480-507.score: 18.0
  49. Stefano Franchi, Herbert Simon , the Anti-Philosopher.score: 18.0
    Herbert Simon’s work presents a curious anomaly to the historian and philosopher trying to understand the development of classic Artificial Intelligence (AI). Simon was one of most influential figures in AI since its birth, and yet it is always with some difficulties that his work can be made to fit within the received canon of AI’s development and goals. In fact, he differed from every other figure in early AI on most counts: in terms of the recognized intellectual heritage (...)
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  50. Axel Honneth & Charles Reitz (2013). Herbert Marcuse and the Frankfurt School. Radical Philosophy Review 16 (1):49-57.score: 18.0
    This paper presents the distinctive qualities of Herbert Marcuse’s approach to critical theorizing. Marcuse’s early life in the German capital city of Berlin had lasting and contrasting impacts upon his political perspective and social activism when compared to the more provincial Frankfurt experiences of Horkheimer and Adorno. Marcuse was also more upbeat, resistant to defeatism, and conventionally thorough—in other words, less fragmentary or experimental—in his academic writing. I also offer a detailed description of the deep intellectual affinities linking the (...)
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