Search results for 'Heredity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther (2000). Darwin on Variation and Heredity. Journal of the History of Biology 33 (3):425-455.score: 24.0
    Darwin’s ideas on variation, heredity, and development differ significantly from twentieth-century views. First, Darwin held that environmental changes, acting either on the reproductive organs or the body, were necessary to generate variation. Second, heredity was a developmental, not a transmissional, process; variation was a change in the developmental process of change. An analysis of Darwin’s elaboration and modification of these two positions from his early notebooks (1836–1844) to the last edition of the /Variation of Animals and Plants Under (...)
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  2. Maria Kronfeldner (2009). If There is Nothing Beyond the Organic...: Heredity and Culture at the Boundaries of Anthropology in the Work of Alfred L. Kroeber. [REVIEW] NTM - Journal of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine 17 (2):107-134.score: 24.0
    Continuing Franz Boas' work to establish anthropology as an academic discipline in the US at the turn of the twentieth century, Alfred L. Kroeber re-defined culture as a phenomenon sui generis. To achieve this he asked geneticists to enter into a coalition against hereditarian thoughts prevalent at that time in the US. The goal was to create space for anthropology as a separate discipline within academia, distinct from other disciplines. To this end he crossed the boundary separating anthropology from biology (...)
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  3. Carlos López-Beltrán (2004). In the Cradle of Heredity; French Physicians and L'Hérédité Naturelle in the Early 19th Century. Journal of the History of Biology 37 (1):39 - 72.score: 24.0
    This paper argues that our modern concept of biological heredity was first clearly introduced in a theoretical and practical setting by the generation of French physicians that were active between 1810 and 1830. It describes how from a traditional focus on hereditary transmission of disease, influential French medical men like Esquirol, Fodéré, Piorry, Lévy, moved towards considering heredity a central concept for the conception of the human bodily frame, and its set of physical and moral dispositions. The notion (...)
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  4. Valeria Mosini (2013). Proteins, the Chaperone Function and Heredity. Biology and Philosophy 28 (1):53-74.score: 24.0
    In this paper I use a case study—the discovery of the chaperon function exerted by proteins in the various steps of the hereditary process—to re-discuss the question whether the nucleic acids are the sole repositories of relevant information as assumed in the information theory of heredity. The evidence I here present of a crucial role for molecular chaperones in the folding of nascent proteins, as well as in DNA duplication, RNA folding and gene control, suggests that the family of (...)
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  5. Michael Bulmer (1999). The Development of Francis Galton's Ideas on the Mechanism of Heredity. Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):263 - 292.score: 24.0
    Galton greeted Darwin's theory of pangenesis with enthusiasm, and tried to test the assumption that the hereditary particles circulate in the blood by transfusion experiments on rabbits. The failure of these experiments led him to reject this assumption, and in the 1870s he developed an alternative theory of heredity, which incorporated those parts of Darwin's theory that did not involve the transportation of hereditary particles throughout the system. He supposed that the fertilized ovum contains a large number of hereditary (...)
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  6. Sheila Faith Weiss (2006). Human Genetics and Politics as Mutually Beneficial Resources: The Case of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics During the Third Reich. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):41 - 88.score: 24.0
    This essay analyzes one of Germany's former premier research institutions for biomedical research, the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics (KWIA) as a test case for the way in which politics and human heredity served as resources for each other during the Third Reich. Examining the KWIA from this perspective brings us a step closer to answering the questions at the heart of most recent scholarship concerning the biomedical community under the swastika: (1) How do (...)
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  7. Brad D. Hume (2008). Quantifying Characters: Polygenist Anthropologists and the Hardening of Heredity. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (1):119 - 158.score: 24.0
    Scholars studying the history of heredity suggest that during the 19th-century biologists and anthropologists viewed characteristics as a collection of blended qualities passed on from the parents. Many argued that those characteristics could be very much affected by environmental circumstances, which scholars call the inheritance of acquired characteristics or "soft" heredity. According to these accounts, Gregor Mendel reconceived heredity - seeing distinct hereditary units that remain unchanged by the environment. This resulted in particular traits that breed true (...)
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  8. Sara Eigen Figal (2008). Heredity, Race, and the Birth of the Modern. Routledge.score: 21.0
    This book places under sustained scrutiny some of our most basic modern assumptions about inheritance, genealogy, blood relations, and racial categories. It has at its core a deceptively simple question, one too often taken for granted: what constitutes good bonds among humans, and what compels us to determine them so across generations as both a physical and a metaphysical attribute? Answering this question is complex and involves a foray into a seemingly disparate array of early modern sources: from adages, common (...)
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  9. Carlos López-Beltrán (2012). Exploring Heredity: Diachronic and Synchronic Connections. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 35 (1):45-50.score: 21.0
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  10. Ilana Löwy (2012). Prenatal Diagnosis and the Transformation of the Epistemic Space of Human Heredity. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 35 (1):99-104.score: 21.0
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  11. Phillip Thurtle (2002). Harnessing Heredity in Gilded Age America: Middle Class Mores and Industrial Breeding in a Cultural Context. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 35 (1):43 - 78.score: 21.0
    By investigating the practices and beliefs of Gilded Age trotting horse breeders, this article demonstrates the relationship between industrial economic development and the growth of genetic reasoning in the United States. As most historians of biology already know, E.H. Harriman, Leland Stanford, and John D. Rockefeller not only transformed American business practice, they donated heavily to institutions that promoted eugenic research programs. What is not widely known, however, is that these same industrialists were accomplished trotting horse breeders with well-developed theories (...)
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  12. Ute Deichmann (2010). Gemmules and Elements: On Darwin's and Mendel's Concepts and Methods in Heredity. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 41 (1):85-112.score: 18.0
    Inheritance and variation were a major focus of Charles Darwin’s studies. Small inherited variations were at the core of his theory of organic evolution by means of natural selection. He put forward a developmental theory of heredity (pangenesis) based on the assumption of the existence of material hereditary particles. However, unlike his proposition of natural selection as a new mechanism for evolutionary change, Darwin’s highly speculative and contradictory hypotheses on heredity were unfruitful for further research. They attempted to (...)
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  13. Robert Olby (2011). Staffan Müller-Wille & Hans-Jörg Rheinberger (Eds): Heredity Produced. At the Crossroads of Biology, Politics, and Culture, 1500–1870. Acta Biotheoretica 59 (3):327-331.score: 18.0
    Staffan Müller-Wille & Hans-Jörg Rheinberger (Eds): Heredity Produced. At the Crossroads of Biology, Politics, and Culture, 1500–1870 Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 327-331 DOI 10.1007/s10441-011-9130-4 Authors Robert Olby, Department of the History and Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh, 1017 Cathedral of Learning, Pittsburgh, PA 15236, USA Journal Acta Biotheoretica Online ISSN 1572-8358 Print ISSN 0001-5342 Journal Volume Volume 59 Journal Issue Volume 59, Numbers 3-4.
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  14. Frank Kannetzky (2007). What Makes Cultural Heredity Unique? On Action-Types, Intentionality and Cooperation in Imitation. Mind and Language 22 (5):592–623.score: 18.0
    The exploration of the mechanisms of cultural heredity has often been regarded as the key to explicating human uniqueness. Particularly early imitative learning, which is explained as a kind of simulation that rests on the infant’s identification with other persons as intentional agents, has been stressed as the foundation of cumulative cultural transmission. But the question of what are the objects of this mechanism has not been given much attention. Although this is a pivotal point, it still remains obscure. (...)
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  15. Stephen G. Brush (2002). How Theories Became Knowledge: Morgan's Chromosome Theory of Heredity in America and Britain. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 35 (3):471 - 535.score: 18.0
    T. H. Morgan, A. H. Sturtevant, H. J. Muller and C. B. Bridges published their comprehensive treatise "The Mechanism of Mendelian Heredity" in 1915. By 1920 Morgan's "Chromosome Theory of Heredity" was generally accepted by geneticists in the United States, and by British geneticists by 1925. By 1930 it had been incorporated into most general biology, botany, and zoology textbooks as established knowledge. In this paper, I examine the reasons why it was accepted as part of (...)
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  16. C. J. (2001). Ideas of Heredity, Reproduction and Eugenics in Britain, 1800-1875. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (3):457-489.score: 18.0
    In this paper I begin by arguing that there are significant intellectual and normative continuities between pre-Victorian hereditarianism and later Victorian eugenical ideologies. Notions of mental heredity and of the dangers of transmitting hereditary 'taints' were already serious concerns among medical practitioners and laymen in the early nineteenth century. I then show how the Victorian period witnessed an increasing tendency for these traditional concerns about hereditary transmission and the integrity of bloodlines to be projected onto the level of national (...)
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  17. Marsha L. Richmond (2006). The 'Domestication' of Heredity: The Familial Organization of Geneticists at Cambridge University, 1895-1910. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 39 (3):565 - 605.score: 18.0
    In the early years of Mendelism, 1900-1910, William Bateson established a productive research group consisting of women and men studying biology at Cambridge. The empirical evidence they provided through investigating the patterns of hereditary in many different species helped confirm the validity of the Mendelian laws of heredity. What has not previously been well recognized is that owing to the lack of sufficient institutional support, the group primarily relied on domestic resources to carry out their work. Members of the (...)
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  18. Jane Maienschein (1987). Heredity/Development in the United States, Circa 1900. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 9 (1):79 - 93.score: 18.0
    Historians have emphasized the appearance of a productive research program in genetics after 1910, and philosophers and biologists have considered endorsement of genetics as a progressive move, indeed as a starting point for modern experimental biology. These efforts focus on what biology had changed to. This paper examines the condition from which biology moved, stressing the way in which Americans held heredity and development as a natural, intimately intertwined couple. Heredity accounts for likenesses, development for variation, and the (...)
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  19. Author unknown (2008). Heredity and its Entities Around 1900. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.score: 18.0
    define the hidden entities presumed to govern the process of hereditary transmissionWith that Hans-Jörg came to conceptualize, Carl Correns , its triple re-appreciation of Gregor Mendel’s work by the botanists Hugo de Vries, Erich Tschermak can be seen as the watershed after which theorizing about heredity & Pure Experimentation—Selecting.
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  20. Diane B. Paul (1998). The Politics of Heredity: Essays on Eugenics, Biomedicine, and the Nature-Nurture Debate. State University of New York Press.score: 18.0
    Explores the political forces underlying shifts in thinking about the respective influence of heredity and environment in shaping human behavior, and the feasibility and morality of eugenics.
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  21. M. Eileen Magnello (1998). Karl Pearson's Mathematization of Inheritance: From Ancestral Heredity to Mendelian Genetics (1895–1909). Annals of Science 55 (1):35-94.score: 18.0
    Summary Long-standing claims have been made for nearly the entire twentieth century that the biometrician, Karl Pearson, and his colleague, W. F. R. Weldon, rejected Mendelism as a theory of inheritance. It is shown that at the end of the nineteenth century Pearson considered various theories of inheritance (including Francis Galton's law of ancestral heredity for characters underpinned by continuous variation), and by 1904 he ?accepted the fundamental idea of Mendel? as a theory of inheritance for discontinuous variation. Moreover, (...)
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  22. Evelyn Fox Keller (1998). Structures of Heredity. Review of Eva Jablonka and Marion Lamb, Epigenetic Inheritance and Evolution, the Lamarckian Dimension. Biology and Philosophy 13 (1):113-118.score: 15.0
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  23. Paul Griffiths (2003). Beyond the Baldwin Effect: James Mark Baldwin's 'Social Heredity', Epigenetic Inheritance, and Niche Construction. In Bruce H. Weber & David J. Depew (eds.), Evolution and Learning: The Baldwin Effect Reconsidered. Mit Press. 193--215.score: 15.0
  24. Stephen M. Downes, Heredity and Heritability. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 15.0
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  25. Eugene Earnshaw-Whyte (2012). Increasingly Radical Claims About Heredity and Fitness. Philosophy of Science 79 (3):396-412.score: 15.0
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  26. William C. Wimsatt (1999). Genes, Memes, and Cultural Heredity. Biology and Philosophy 14 (2):279-310.score: 15.0
  27. Francesco Alfieri (2008). Hedwig Conrad-Martius: A Philosophical Heredity, Illustrated by E. Avé-Lallemant. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 18 (4):515-531.score: 15.0
    The present paper is an annotated transcription of an interview held on the 29th of August 2007 in E. Avé-Lallemant’s flat in Munich. He was Hedwig Conrad-Martius’ assistant, carried on her work and research, and filed her legacy, which is deposited at the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek in Munich. In this interview Avé-Lallemant remembers Conrad-Martius as a person and as a philosopher and discusses her philosophical evolution within Husserl’s phenomenological school, the relationship between biology and phenomenology, her rediscovering of Aristotelian philosophy, and, (...)
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  28. Max Hocutt & Michael Levin (1999). The Bell Curve Case for Heredity. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 29 (3):389-415.score: 15.0
    City College of New York The hereditarian theory of race differences in IQ was briefly revived with the appearance of The Bell Curve but then quickly dismissed. The authors attempt a defense of it here, with an eye to conceptual and logical issues of special interests to philosophers, such as alleged infirmities in the heritability concept. At the same time, some relevant post-Bell Curve empirical data are introduced.
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  29. John C. Waller (2001). Ideas of Heredity, Reproduction and Eugenics in Britain, 1800–1875. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (3):457-489.score: 15.0
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  30. Tobias Cheung (2007). Heredity Produced. At the Crossroads of Biology, Politics, and Culture, 1500-1870. Early Science and Medicine 12 (4):463-464.score: 15.0
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  31. R. Amundsom (1999). Review. Darwinism's Struggle for Survival: Heredity and the Hypothesis of Natural Selection. J Gayon. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (4):761-767.score: 15.0
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  32. Jean Gayon & Doris T. Zallen (1998). The Role of the Vilmorin Company in the Promotion and Diffusion of the Experimental Science of Heredity in France, 1840-1920. Journal of the History of Biology 31 (2):241 - 262.score: 15.0
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  33. Gregory Radick (2012). Should “Heredity” and “Inheritance” Be Biological Terms? William Bateson's Change of Mind as a Historical and Philosophical Problem. Philosophy of Science 79 (5):714-724.score: 15.0
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  34. Hans-Jörg Rheinberger (2008). Heredity and its Entities Around 1900. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (3):370-374.score: 15.0
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  35. Owen Kember (1973). Anaxagoras' Theory of Sex Differentiation Aud Heredity. Phronesis 18 (1):1-14.score: 15.0
  36. Saul Fisher (2003). Gassendi's Atomist Account of Generation and Heredity in Plants and Animals. Perspectives on Science 11 (4):484-512.score: 15.0
  37. Carlos López-Beltrán (1994). Forging Heredity: From Metaphor to Cause, a Reification Story. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (2):211-235.score: 15.0
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  38. Philip H. Phenix (1953). A Note on Heredity, Environment, and Personality. Journal of Philosophy 50 (2):39-41.score: 15.0
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  39. Sydney Waterlow (1914). Heredity and Memory. [REVIEW] Ethics 24 (2):232-.score: 15.0
  40. L. D. Keita (2001). The Bell Curve and Heredity: A Reply to Hocutt and Levin. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (3):386-394.score: 15.0
  41. Owen Kember (1973). Anaxagoras' Theory of Sex Differentiation and Heredity. Phronesis 18 (1):1 - 14.score: 15.0
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  42. Jacques Loeb (1897). On Egg-Structure and the Heredity of Instincts. The Monist 7 (4):481-493.score: 15.0
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  43. Gregory Radick (2011). Physics in the Galtonian Sciences of Heredity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (2):129-138.score: 15.0
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  44. Ana Barahona (2012). The History of Genetics in Mexico in the Light of A Cultural History of Heredity. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 35 (1):69-74.score: 15.0
  45. A. Govaerts (1925). The Influence of Heredity in the Etiology of Tuberculosis. The Eugenics Review 17 (1):12.score: 15.0
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  46. Jas Johnstone (1931). The Interpretation of Development and Heredity. A Study in Biological Method. By E. S. Russell O.B.E., D.Sc., (Oxford: The Clarendon Press. 1930. Pp. 312. Price 15s. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 6 (22):252-.score: 15.0
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  47. J. A. Thomson (1892). Book Review:Education and Heredity. J. M. Guyau, W. J. Greenstreet. [REVIEW] Ethics 2 (2):243-.score: 15.0
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  48. Daniel Trembly MacDougal (1906). Heredity and the Origin of Species. The Monist 16 (1):32-64.score: 15.0
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  49. James Oliver (1912). The Hereditary Tendency to Twinning. With Some Observations Concerning the Theory of Heredity Generally: Part II. The Eugenics Review 4 (2):154.score: 15.0
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  50. C. J. Bond (1930). Heredity in Man. The Eugenics Review 21 (4):285.score: 15.0
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