Search results for 'Herman Cappelen with John Hawthorne' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Herman Cappelen & John Hawthorne (2009). Relativism and Monadic Truth. Oxford University Press.score: 12540.0
    Relativism has dominated many intellectual circles, past and present, but the twentieth century saw it banished to the fringes of mainstream analytic philosophy. Of late, however, it is making something of a comeback within that loosely configured tradition, a comeback that attempts to capitalize on some important ideas in foundational semantics. Relativism and Monadic Truth aims not merely to combat analytic relativism but also to combat the foundational ideas in semantics that led to its revival. Doing so requires a proper (...)
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  2. Herman Cappelen & John Hawthorne (2011). Reply to Glanzberg, Soames and Weatherson. [REVIEW] Analysis 71 (1):143-56.score: 5100.0
    One of Weatherson's main goals is to drive home a methodological point: We shouldn't be looking for deductive arguments for or against relativism – we should instead be evaluating inductive arguments designed to show that either relativism or some alternative offers the best explanation of some data. Our focus in Chapter Two on diagnostics for shared content allegedly encourages the search for deductive arguments and so does more harm than good. We have no methodological slogan of our own to offer. (...)
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  3. Herman Cappelen & John Hawthorne (2011). Reply to Lasersohn, MacFarlane, and Richard. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 156 (3):417-419.score: 4800.0
    Reply to Lasersohn, MacFarlane, and Richard.
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  4. Herman Cappelen & John Hawthorne (2007). Locations and Binding. Analysis 67 (294):95–105.score: 4800.0
    It is natural to think that the relationship between ‘rain’ and the location of rain is different from the relationship between ‘dance’ and the location of dancing. Utterances of (1) are typically interpreted as, in some sense, being about a location in which it rains. (2) is, typically, not interpreted as being about a location in which the dancing takes place.
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  5. Herman Cappelen & John Hawthorne (2011). Summary. [REVIEW] Analysis 71 (1):109 - 111.score: 4800.0
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  6. Herman Cappelen with John Hawthorne, Locations and Binding.score: 774.0
    We present some new data about binding and a theory that explains the phenomena by appeal to event quantification.
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  7. Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore, Reply to John MacFarlane.score: 480.0
    In Insensitive Semantics (INS) and earlier work (see for example C&L (1997), (1998), (2004), (2005)) we defend a combination of two views: speech act pluralism and semantic minimalism. We're not alone advocating speech act pluralism; a modified version of it can be found in Mark Richard (1998), and we're delighted to have found a recent ally in Scott Soames (see chapter 3 of Soames (2001)1). There's less explicit support for minimalism, though we think it’s one way to interpret parts of (...)
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  8. Herman Cappelen & Ernest Lepore (2007). Language Turned on Itself: The Semantics and Pragmatics of Metalinguistic Discourse. OUP Oxford.score: 402.0
    Language Turned on Itself examines what happens when language becomes self-reflexive; when language is used to talk about language. Those who think, talk, and write about language are habitual users of various metalinguistic devices, but reliance on these devices begins early: kids are told, 'That's called a "rabbit"'. It's not implausible that a primitive capacity for the meta-linguistic kicks in at the beginning stages of language acquisition. But no matter when or how frequently these devices are invoked, one thing is (...)
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  9. Andrews Reath, Barbara Herman, Christine M. Korsgaard & John Rawls (eds.) (1997). Reclaiming the History of Ethics: Essays for John Rawls. Cambridge University Press.score: 330.0
    The essays in this volume offer an approach to the history of moral and political philosophy that takes its inspiration from John Rawls. All the contributors are philosophers who have studied with Rawls and they offer this collection in his honor. The distinctive feature of this approach is to address substantive normative questions in moral and political philosophy through an analysis of the texts and theories of major figures in the history of the subject: Aristotle, Hobbes, Hume, Rousseau, (...)
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  10. Herman Cappelen, Reply to Hawthorne.score: 330.0
    In Chapter 7 of IS we rely crucially on tests for how speakers share content across contexts. We claim these tests can be used to gather evidence both for and against claims about an expression being context sensitive. Many philosophers now rely on these and related tests – Hawthorne (2003) being early proponent (cf. also Egan, Hawthorne and Weatherson (2004), Lasersohn (2006), Macfarlane (2004), Richard (2004), and (arguably) Stanley (2005)). In his reply, Hawthorne raises interesting challenges to (...)
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  11. John Hawthorne & Karson Kovakovich (2006). Disjunctivism. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):145-83.score: 252.0
    [John Hawthorne] We examine some well-known disjunctivist projects in the philosophy of perception, mainly in a critical vein. Our discussion is divided into four parts. Following some introductory remarks, we examine in part two the link between object-dependent contents and disjunctivism. In part three, we explore the disjunctivist's use of discriminability facts as a basis for understanding experience. In part four, we examine an interesting argument for disjunctivism that has been offered by Michael Martin. /// [Scott Sturgeon] The (...)
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  12. Herman Cappelen (2012). Philosophy Without Intuitions. Oxford University Press.score: 252.0
    The standard view of philosophical methodology is that philosophers rely on intuitions as evidence. Herman Cappelen argues that this claim is false, and reveals how it has encouraged pseudo-problems, presented misguided ideas of what philosophy is, and misled exponents of metaphilosophy and experimental philosophy.
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  13. John Hawthorne (2006). Metaphysical Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 252.0
    John Hawthorne is widely regarded as one of the finest philosophers working today. He is perhaps best known for his contributions to metaphysics, and this volume collects his most notable papers in this field. Hawthorne offers original treatments of fundamental topics in philosophy, including identity, ontology, vagueness, and causation. Six of the essays appear here for the first time, and there is a valuable introduction to guide the reader through the selection.
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  14. Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (2006). Replies. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (2):469–492.score: 252.0
    Symposium on Insensitive Semantics. Replies to Kent Bach, John Hawthorne, Kepa Korta and John Perry, and Robert J. Stainton.
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  15. John Hawthorne (2004). Knowledge and Lotteries. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    Knowledge and Lotteries is organized around an epistemological puzzle: in many cases, we seem consistently inclined to deny that we know a certain class of propositions, while crediting ourselves with knowledge of propositions that imply them. In its starkest form, the puzzle is this: we do not think we know that a given lottery ticket will be a loser, yet we normally count ourselves as knowing all sorts of ordinary things that entail that its holder will not suddenly acquire (...)
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  16. Michael A. Bishop, J. D. Trout, L. Johannes Brandl, Marian David, Leopold Stubenberg, Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (2005). Appearance in This List Neither Guarantees nor Precludes a Future Review of the Book. Agamben, Giorgio, Trans. Kevin Attell, State of Exception, London and Chicago: Univer-Sity of Chicago Press, 2005, Pp. Vii+ 95,£ 8.50, $12.00. Aiken, William and John Haldane (Eds), Philosophy and Its Public Role, Exeter, UK and Charlottesville, VA: Imprint Academic, 2004, Pp. Vi+ 272,£ 14.95, $29.90. [REVIEW] Mind 114:454.score: 210.0
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  17. Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (2007). The Myth of Unarticulated Constituents. In Michael O'Rourke & Corey Washington (eds.), Situating Semantics: Essays on the Philosophy of John Perry. MIT Press. 199-215.score: 180.0
    This paper evaluates arguments presented by John Perry (and Ken Taylor) in favor of the presence of an unarticulated constituent in the proposition expressed by utterance of, for example, (1):1 1. It's raining (at t). We contend that these arguments are, at best, inconclusive. That's the critical part of our paper. On the positive side, we argue that (1) has as its semantic content the proposition that it is raining (at t) and that this is a location-neutral proposition. According (...)
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  18. Lorenz Demey (2010). Herman Cappelen and John Hawthorne, Relativism and Monadic Truth. Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2009. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 72 (1):173-174.score: 151.2
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  19. Dan Zeman (2009). Relativism and Monadic Truth, by Herman Cappelen and John Hawthorne. Disputatio.score: 151.2
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  20. Maksymilian Roszyk (2012). Herman Cappelen, John Hawthorne, Relativism and Monadic Truth. Roczniki Filozoficzne:135-143.score: 147.6
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  21. David Braun (2013). Contextualism About 'Might' and Says-That Ascriptions. Philosophical Studies 164 (2):485-511.score: 101.4
    Contextualism about ‘might’ says that the property that ‘might’ expresses varies from context to context. I argue against contextualism. I focus on problems that contextualism apparently has with attitude ascriptions in which ‘might’ appears in an embedded ‘that’-clause. I argue that contextualists can deal rather easily with many of these problems, but I also argue that serious difficulties remain with collective and quantified says-that ascriptions. Herman Cappelen and John Hawthorne atempt to deal (...) these remaining problems, but I argue that their attempt fails. (shrink)
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  22. John Hawthorne (2002). Advice for Physicalists. Philosophical Studies 109 (1):17-52.score: 100.0
    This paper engages with two compelling challenges to physicalism, each designed to show that the nature of experience is elusive from the standpoint of physical science. It is argued that the physicalist is ultimately well placed to meet both challenges.
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  23. Richard J. Blackwell (1966). "Aristotle's Vision of Nature," by Frederick J. E . Woodbridge, Ed. with Introd. By John Herman Randall, Jr. The Modern Schoolman 43 (3):298-299.score: 81.0
  24. Gerhard Preyer & Georg Peter (eds.) (2005). Contextualism in Philosophy: Knowledge, Meaning, and Truth. Oxford University Press.score: 76.2
    In epistemology and in philosophy of language there is fierce debate about the role of context in knowledge, understanding, and meaning. Many contemporary epistemologists take seriously the thesis that epistemic vocabulary is context-sensitive. This thesis is of course a semantic claim, so it has brought epistemologists into contact with work on context in semantics by philosophers of language. This volume brings together the debates, in a set of twelve specially written essays representing the latest work by leading figures in (...)
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  25. Timothy Williamson, Reply to John Hawthorne and Maria Lasonen-Aarnio.score: 67.8
    1. As John Hawthorne and Maria Lasonen-Aarnio appreciate, some of the central issues raised in their ‘Knowledge and Objective Chance’ arise for all but the most extreme theories of knowledge. In a wide range of cases, according to very plausible everyday judgments, we know something about the future, even though, according to quantum mechanics, our belief has a small but nonzero chance (objective probability) of being untrue. In easily constructed examples, we are in that position simultaneously with (...)
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  26. Shannon Sullivan (2000). Reconfiguring Gender with John Dewey: Habit, Bodies, and Cultural Change. Hypatia 15 (1):23-42.score: 51.6
    : This paper demonstrates how John Dewey's notion of habit can help us understand gender as a constitutive structure of bodily existence. Bringing Dewey's pragmatism in conjunction with Judith Butler's concept of performativity, I provide an account of how rigid binary configurations of gender might be transformed at the level of both individual habit and cultural construct.
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  27. Mark Richard (2011). Relativistic Content and Disagreement. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 156 (3):421-431.score: 50.4
    Herman Cappelen and John Hawthorne’s Relativism and Monadic Truth presses a number of worries about relativistic content. It forces one to think carefully about what a relativist should mean by saying that speakers disagree or contradict one another in asserting such content. My focus is on this question, though at points (in particular in Sect. 4) I touch on other issues Cappelen and Hawthorne (CH) raise.
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  28. Alexander Almér & Dag Westerståhl (2010). Review of Relativism and Monadic Truth. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 33 (1):37-50.score: 50.4
    This is a review of Herman Cappelen and John Hawthorne’s book Relativism and Monadic Truth (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2009).
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  29. Noel Malcolm & Jacqueline Stedall (2004). John Pell (1611-1685) and His Correspondence with Sir Charles Cavendish: The Mental World of an Early Modern Mathematician. [REVIEW] OUP Oxford.score: 48.0
    The mathematician John Pell was a member of that golden generation of scientists Boyle, Wren, Hooke, and others which came together in the early Royal Society. Although he left a huge body of manuscript materials, he has remained an extraordinarily neglected figure, whose papers have never been properly explored. This book, the first ever full-length study of Pell, presents an in-depth account of his life and mathematical thinking, based on a detailed study of his manuscripts. It not only restores (...)
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  30. Jordi Morillas Esteban (2013). TOLAND, John: Reasons for Naturalizing the Jews in Great Britain and Ireland on the Same Foot with All Other Nations. Containing also, A Defence of the Jews against All Vulgar Prejudices in all Countries. Dublín, 2013. [REVIEW] Daímon 59:215-217.score: 45.0
    Reseña de la obra de Toland Reasons for Naturalizing the Jews in Great Britain and Ireland on the Same Foot with All Other Nations. Containing also, A Defence of the Jews against All Vulgar Prejudices in all Countries reeditada recientemente.
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  31. Mark Mccullagh (2011). Critical Notice of Language Turned on Itself, by Herman Cappelen and Ernie Lepore. Analytic Philosophy 52 (4):349-367.score: 42.6
    This is a lively, provocative book and many of its arguments are convincing. In this critical study I summarize the book, then discuss some of the authors’ claims, dwelling on three issues: their objections to the view of François Recanati on “pre-semantic” effects; the relation between their theory of quotation and the Tarskian “Proper Name Theory,” which they reject; and their treatment of mixed quotation, which rests on the claim that quotation expressions are “syntactic chameleons.” I argue that the objections (...)
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  32. Quentin Smith (2000). Problems with John Earman's Attempt to Reconcile Theism with General Relativity. Erkenntnis 52 (1):1-27.score: 42.6
    Discussions of the intersection of general relativity and thephilosophy of religion rarely take place on the technical levelthat involves the details of the mathematical physics of generalrelativity. John Earman's discussion of theism and generalrelativity in his recent book on spacetime singularities is anexception to this tendency. By virtue of his technical expertise,Earman is able to introduce novel arguments into the debatebetween theists and atheists. In this paper, I state and examineEarman's arguments that it is rationally acceptable to believethat theism (...)
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  33. Mikkel Thorup & Frank Beck Lassen (2007). Where Did Nazism Come From? Tibet?: Interview with John Gray. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (3):373-385.score: 42.6
    Department for the History of Ideas, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark The interview revolves around the idea that Al Qaeda is a distinctively modern phenomenon dependent upon modern and Western ideas of transformation of the human condition through mass violence. Meanwhile, the USA and Europe are deeply superstitious about their own unique position in the world. Professor John Gray outlines a clash of modernisms, the one not less ambitious or global in nature than the other. He applies an analysis (...)
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  34. Frances S. Adeney, Terry C. Muck & John Cobb (forthcoming). Economic Growth Vs. Human Well-Being: An Interview with John Cobb. Buddhist-Christian Studies.score: 42.6
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  35. Sharada Sugirtharajah & John Hick (eds.) (2012). Religious Pluralism and the Modern World: An Ongoing Engagement with John Hick. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.6
     
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  36. Charles Wallace (2003). Eating and Drinking with John Wesley: The Logic of His Practice. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 85 (2):137-155.score: 42.6
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  37. Thomas Wells & John Davis (forthcoming). Identity Problems (An Interview with John B. Davis). Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics.score: 42.6
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  38. John Locke (1977). The Locke Reader: Selections From the Works of John Locke: With a General Introd. And Commentary. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    Yolton's introduction and commentary explicate Locke's doctrines and provide the reader with the general background knowledge of other seventeenth-century ...
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  39. John Deely (2008). How to Go Nowhere with Language: Remarks on John O'Callaghan, Thomist Realism and the Linguistic Turn. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (2):337-359.score: 42.0
    Jacques Maritain tells us that, apart from St. Thomas himself, his “principal teacher” in Thomism was John Poinsot. Poinsot, like Maritain and Thomas, expressly teaches that the basis of “Thomist realism” lies in the distinction between sentire, which makes no use of concepts, and phantasiari and intelligere, which together depend essentially on concepts. O’Callaghan makes no discussion of this point, resting his notion of realism rather on the widespread quo/quod fallacy, that is, the misinterpretation of concepts as the id (...)
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  40. Johannes Thijssen (2009). The Debate Over the Nature of Motion: John Buridan, Nicole Oresme and Albert of Saxony. With an Edition of John Buridan's Quaestiones Super Libros Physicorum, Secundum Ultimam Lecturam, Book III, Q. 7. Early Science and Medicine 14 (1):186-210.score: 42.0
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  41. Anna-Sara Malmgren (2013). Review of "Philosophy Without Intuitions" by Herman Cappelen. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.score: 39.6
  42. Daniel Cohnitz (2012). Philosophy Without Intuitions, by Herman Cappelen. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, 242 Pp. [REVIEW] Disputatio (33):546-553.score: 39.6
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  43. Jeremy Fantl & Matthew McGrath (2009). Critical Study of John Hawthorne's Knowledge and Lotteries and Jason Stanley's Knowledge and Practical Interests. [REVIEW] Noûs 43 (1):178-192.score: 39.6
  44. Steffen Borge (2006). Review of John Hawthorne’s Knowledge and Lotteries. [REVIEW] Disputatio (20).score: 39.6
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  45. Alan Sidelle (2008). Review of Theodore Sider, John Hawthorne, Dean W. Zimmerman (Eds.), Contemporary Debates in Metaphysics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (6).score: 39.6
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  46. Luca Incurvati (2013). The Reference Book By John Hawthorne and David Manley. Analysis 73 (3):582-585.score: 39.6
  47. Daniel Bonevac (2008). Insensitive Semantics: A Defense of Semantic Minimalism and Speech Act Pluralism - by Herman Cappelen and Ernie Lepore. Philosophical Books 49 (2):157-161.score: 39.6
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  48. E. J. Lowe (2007). Review of John Hawthorne, Metaphysical Essays. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (1).score: 39.6
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  49. Paul Coates (2009). Perceptual Experience – Tamar Gendler and John Hawthorne. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (234):173-176.score: 39.6
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  50. Silke Ackermann & Louise Devoy (2012). 'The Lord of the Smoking Mirror': Objects Associated with John Dee in the British Museum. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (3):539-549.score: 39.6
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