Search results for 'Herman Cappelen with John Hawthorne' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Herman Cappelen & John Hawthorne (2009). Relativism and Monadic Truth. Oxford University Press.
    Relativism has dominated many intellectual circles, past and present, but the twentieth century saw it banished to the fringes of mainstream analytic philosophy. Of late, however, it is making something of a comeback within that loosely configured tradition, a comeback that attempts to capitalize on some important ideas in foundational semantics. Relativism and Monadic Truth aims not merely to combat analytic relativism but also to combat the foundational ideas in semantics that led to its revival. Doing so requires a proper (...)
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  2.  96
    Herman Cappelen & John Hawthorne (2011). Reply to Glanzberg, Soames and Weatherson. [REVIEW] Analysis 71 (1):143-56.
    One of Weatherson's main goals is to drive home a methodological point: We shouldn't be looking for deductive arguments for or against relativism – we should instead be evaluating inductive arguments designed to show that either relativism or some alternative offers the best explanation of some data. Our focus in Chapter Two on diagnostics for shared content allegedly encourages the search for deductive arguments and so does more harm than good. We have no methodological slogan of our own to offer. (...)
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  3.  1
    Herman Cappelen & John Hawthorne (2010). Relativism and Monadic Truth. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Cappelen and Hawthorne present a powerful critique of fashionable relativist accounts of truth, and the foundational ideas in semantics on which the new relativism draws. They argue compellingly that the contents of thought and talk are propositions that instantiate the fundamental monadic properties of truth and falsity.
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  4. Herman Cappelen & John Hawthorne (2011). Reply to Lasersohn, MacFarlane, and Richard. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 156 (3):417-419.
    Reply to Lasersohn, MacFarlane, and Richard.
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  5.  7
    Herman Cappelen, Tamar Szabó Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.) (2016). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Methodology. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This is the most comprehensive book ever published on philosophical methodology. A team of thirty-eight of the world's leading philosophers present original essays on various aspects of how philosophy should be and is done. The first part is devoted to broad traditions and approaches to philosophical methodology. The entries in the second part address topics in philosophical methodology, such as intuitions, conceptual analysis, and transcendental arguments. The third part of the book is devoted to essays about the interconnections between philosophy (...)
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  6. Herman Cappelen, Tamar Szabo Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.) (forthcoming). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Methodology. Oxford University Press.
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  7.  95
    Herman Cappelen & John Hawthorne (2007). Locations and Binding. Analysis 67 (294):95–105.
    It is natural to think that the relationship between ‘rain’ and the location of rain is different from the relationship between ‘dance’ and the location of dancing. Utterances of (1) are typically interpreted as, in some sense, being about a location in which it rains. (2) is, typically, not interpreted as being about a location in which the dancing takes place.
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  8.  13
    Herman Cappelen & John Hawthorne (2011). Summary. [REVIEW] Analysis 71 (1):109 - 111.
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  9.  18
    Herman Cappelen with John Hawthorne, Locations and Binding.
    We present some new data about binding and a theory that explains the phenomena by appeal to event quantification.
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  10.  58
    Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore, Reply to John MacFarlane.
    In Insensitive Semantics (INS) and earlier work (see for example C&L (1997), (1998), (2004), (2005)) we defend a combination of two views: speech act pluralism and semantic minimalism. We're not alone advocating speech act pluralism; a modified version of it can be found in Mark Richard (1998), and we're delighted to have found a recent ally in Scott Soames (see chapter 3 of Soames (2001)1). There's less explicit support for minimalism, though we think it’s one way to interpret parts of (...)
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  11.  77
    Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (2006). Reply to Hawthorne. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research (2).
    In Chapter 7 of IS we rely crucially on tests for how speakers share content across contexts. We claim these tests can be used to gather evidence both for and against claims about an expression being context sensitive. Many philosophers now rely on these and related tests – Hawthorne (2003) being early proponent (cf. also Egan, Hawthorne and Weatherson (2004), Lasersohn (2006), Macfarlane (2004), Richard (2004), and (arguably) Stanley (2005)). In his reply, Hawthorne raises interesting challenges to (...)
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  12. Herman Cappelen & Ernest Lepore (2009). Language Turned on Itself. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Language Turned on Itself examines what happens when language becomes self-reflexive; when language is used to talk about language. Those who think, talk, and write about language are habitual users of various metalinguistic devices, but reliance on these devices begins early: kids are told, 'That's called a "rabbit"'. It's not implausible that a primitive capacity for the meta-linguistic kicks in at the beginning stages of language acquisition. But no matter when or how frequently these devices are invoked, one thing is (...)
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  13. Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (2015). Liberating Content. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This volume brings together two series of papers: one began with Herman Cappelen and Ernie Lepore's 1997 paper 'On an Alleged Connection Between the Theory of Meaning and Indirect Speech'. The other series started with their 1997 paper 'Varieties of Quotation'. The central theme throughout is that only when communicative content is liberated from semantic content will we make progress in understanding language, communication, contexts, and their interconnection. These are the papers in which Cappelen and (...)
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  14. John Hawthorne (ed.) (2010). Philosophical Perspectives, Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Philosophical Perspectives_, an annual, aims to publish original essays by foremost thinkers in their fields, with each volume confined to a main area of philosophical research. Contains original essays in the subject from foremost ethicists John Hawthorne is widely accepted as one of the leading Philosophers of today.
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  15.  70
    Andrews Reath, Barbara Herman, Christine M. Korsgaard & John Rawls (eds.) (1997). Reclaiming the History of Ethics: Essays for John Rawls. Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume offer an approach to the history of moral and political philosophy that takes its inspiration from John Rawls. All the contributors are philosophers who have studied with Rawls and they offer this collection in his honor. The distinctive feature of this approach is to address substantive normative questions in moral and political philosophy through an analysis of the texts and theories of major figures in the history of the subject: Aristotle, Hobbes, Hume, Rousseau, (...)
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  16.  49
    Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (2006). Replies. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (2):469–492.
    Symposium on Insensitive Semantics. Replies to Kent Bach, John Hawthorne, Kepa Korta and John Perry, and Robert J. Stainton.
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  17.  6
    Lorenz Demey (2010). Herman Cappelen and John Hawthorne, Relativism and Monadic Truth. Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2009. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 72 (1):173-174.
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  18.  4
    Dan Zeman (2009). Relativism and Monadic Truth, by Herman Cappelen and John Hawthorne. Disputatio.
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  19. John Hawthorne (2004). Knowledge and Lotteries. Oxford University Press.
    Knowledge and Lotteries is organized around an epistemological puzzle: in many cases, we seem consistently inclined to deny that we know a certain class of propositions, while crediting ourselves with knowledge of propositions that imply them. In its starkest form, the puzzle is this: we do not think we know that a given lottery ticket will be a loser, yet we normally count ourselves as knowing all sorts of ordinary things that entail that its holder will not suddenly acquire (...)
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  20. Maksymilian Roszyk (2012). Herman Cappelen, John Hawthorne, Relativism and Monadic Truth. Roczniki Filozoficzne:135-143.
     
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  21. John Hawthorne (2004). Knowledge and Lotteries. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Knowledge and Lotteries is organized around an epistemological puzzle: in many cases, we seem consistently inclined to deny that we know a certain class of propositions, while crediting ourselves with knowledge of propositions that imply them. In its starkest form, the puzzle is this: we do not think we know that a given lottery ticket will be a loser, yet we normally count ourselves as knowing all sorts of ordinary things that entail that its holder will not suddenly acquire (...)
     
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  22.  6
    Michael A. Bishop, J. D. Trout, L. Johannes Brandl, Marian David, Leopold Stubenberg, Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (2005). Appearance in This List Neither Guarantees nor Precludes a Future Review of the Book. Agamben, Giorgio, Trans. Kevin Attell, State of Exception, London and Chicago: Univer-Sity of Chicago Press, 2005, Pp. Vii+ 95,£ 8.50, $12.00. Aiken, William and John Haldane (Eds), Philosophy and Its Public Role, Exeter, UK and Charlottesville, VA: Imprint Academic, 2004, Pp. Vi+ 272,£ 14.95, $29.90. [REVIEW] Mind 114:454.
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  23. John Hawthorne (2005). Knowledge and Lotteries. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Knowledge and Lotteries is organized around an epistemological puzzle: in many cases, we seem consistently inclined to deny that we know certain propositions, while crediting ourselves with knowledge of propositions that imply them. In its starkest form, the puzzle is this: we do not think we know that a given lottery ticket will be a loser, yet we normally count ourselves as knowing all sorts of things which entail that its holder will not suddenly acquire a large fortune. After (...)
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  24. Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (2007). The Myth of Unarticulated Constituents. In Michael O'Rourke & Corey Washington (eds.), Situating Semantics: Essays on the Philosophy of John Perry. MIT Press 199-214.
    This paper evaluates arguments presented by John Perry (and Ken Taylor) in favor of the presence of an unarticulated constituent in the proposition expressed by utterance of, for example, (1):1 1. It's raining (at t). We contend that these arguments are, at best, inconclusive. That's the critical part of our paper. On the positive side, we argue that (1) has as its semantic content the proposition that it is raining (at t) and that this is a location-neutral proposition. According (...)
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  25.  62
    David Braun (2013). Contextualism About 'Might' and Says-That Ascriptions. Philosophical Studies 164 (2):485-511.
    Contextualism about ‘might’ says that the property that ‘might’ expresses varies from context to context. I argue against contextualism. I focus on problems that contextualism apparently has with attitude ascriptions in which ‘might’ appears in an embedded ‘that’-clause. I argue that contextualists can deal rather easily with many of these problems, but I also argue that serious difficulties remain with collective and quantified says-that ascriptions. Herman Cappelen and John Hawthorne atempt to deal (...) these remaining problems, but I argue that their attempt fails. (shrink)
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  26.  6
    Richard J. Blackwell (1966). "Aristotle's Vision of Nature," by Frederick J. E . Woodbridge, Ed. with Introd. By John Herman Randall, Jr. Modern Schoolman 43 (3):298-299.
  27.  92
    Gerhard Preyer & Georg Peter (eds.) (2005). Contextualism in Philosophy: Knowledge, Meaning, and Truth. Oxford University Press.
    In epistemology and in philosophy of language there is fierce debate about the role of context in knowledge, understanding, and meaning. Many contemporary epistemologists take seriously the thesis that epistemic vocabulary is context-sensitive. This thesis is of course a semantic claim, so it has brought epistemologists into contact with work on context in semantics by philosophers of language. This volume brings together the debates, in a set of twelve specially written essays representing the latest work by leading figures in (...)
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  28.  80
    Timothy Williamson, Reply to John Hawthorne and Maria Lasonen-Aarnio.
    1. As John Hawthorne and Maria Lasonen-Aarnio appreciate, some of the central issues raised in their ‘Knowledge and Objective Chance’ arise for all but the most extreme theories of knowledge. In a wide range of cases, according to very plausible everyday judgments, we know something about the future, even though, according to quantum mechanics, our belief has a small but nonzero chance (objective probability) of being untrue. In easily constructed examples, we are in that position simultaneously (...) respect to many different propositions about the future that are equiprobable and probabilistically independent of each other, at least to a reasonable approximation. (shrink)
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  29. Michael O'Rourke & Corey Washington (eds.) (2007). Situating Semantics: Essays on the Philosophy of John Perry. A Bradford Book.
    John Perry, Henry Waldgrave Stuart Professor of Philosophy at Stanford University, is one of a handful of contemporary analytic philosophers to combine the focused approach of most current work in analytic philosophy with the more expansive systems-building of earlier analytic philosophers and contemporary philosophers in other disciplines. Perry, like W.V.O. Quine, Donald Davison, David Lewis, and Hilary Putnam, focuses on narrow topics across a broad range of subjects. In this volume, leading contemporary analytic philosophers contribute original essays in (...)
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  30.  85
    Mark Mccullagh (2011). Critical Notice of Language Turned on Itself, by Herman Cappelen and Ernie Lepore. Analytic Philosophy 52 (4):349-367.
    This is a lively, provocative book and many of its arguments are convincing. In this critical study I summarize the book, then discuss some of the authors’ claims, dwelling on three issues: their objections to the view of François Recanati on “pre-semantic” effects; the relation between their theory of quotation and the Tarskian “Proper Name Theory,” which they reject; and their treatment of mixed quotation, which rests on the claim that quotation expressions are “syntactic chameleons.” I (...)
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  31. Mark Richard (2011). Relativistic Content and Disagreement. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 156 (3):421-431.
    Herman Cappelen and John Hawthorne’s Relativism and Monadic Truth presses a number of worries about relativistic content. It forces one to think carefully about what a relativist should mean by saying that speakers disagree or contradict one another in asserting such content. My focus is on this question, though at points (in particular in Sect. 4) I touch on other issues Cappelen and Hawthorne (CH) raise.
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  32.  83
    Alexander Almér & Dag Westerståhl (2010). Review of Relativism and Monadic Truth. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 33 (1):37-50.
    This is a review of Herman Cappelen and John Hawthorne’s book Relativism and Monadic Truth (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2009).
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  33. Ursula M. Zeglen (ed.) (1999). Donald Davidson: Truth, Meaning and Knowledge. Routledge.
    Donald Davidson has made enormous contributions to the philosophy of action, epistemology, semantics and philosophy of mind and today is recognized as one of the most important analytical philosophers of the late twentieth century. _Donald Davidson: Truth, Meaning and Knowledge_ addresses * Davidson's writings on epistemology and theory of language with their implications of ontology and philosophy of mind * the central issue of whether truth is the ultimate goal of enquiry, challenged by contributions from Richard Rorty and Paul (...)
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  34. Urszula M. Zeglen (ed.) (2012). Donald Davidson: Truth, Meaning and Knowledge. Routledge.
    Donald Davidson has made enormous contributions to the philosophy of action, epistemology, semantics and philosophy of mind and today is recognized as one of the most important analytical philosophers of the late twentieth century. _Donald Davidson: Truth, Meaning and Knowledge_ addresses * Davidson's writings on epistemology and theory of language with their implications of ontology and philosophy of mind * the central issue of whether truth is the ultimate goal of enquiry, challenged by contributions from Richard Rorty and Paul (...)
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  35. Urszula M. Zeglen (ed.) (1999). Donald Davidson: Truth, Meaning and Knowledge. Routledge.
    Donald Davidson has made enormous contributions to the philosophy of action, epistemology, semantics and philosophy of mind and today is recognized as one of the most important analytical philosophers of the late twentieth century. _Donald Davidson: Truth, Meaning and Knowledge_ addresses * Davidson's writings on epistemology and theory of language with their implications of ontology and philosophy of mind * the central issue of whether truth is the ultimate goal of enquiry, challenged by contributions from Richard Rorty and Paul (...)
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  36. Berit Brogaard (2009). Perceptual Content and Monadic Truth: On Cappelen and Hawthorne's Relativism and Monadic Truth. Philosophical Books 50 (4):213-226.
    I will begin with a brief presentation of C & H’s arguments against nonindexical contextualism, temporalism, and relativism. I will then offer a general argument against the monadic truth package. Finally, I will offer arguments in favor of nonindexical contextualism and temporalism.
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  37. Delia Graff Fara (2015). A Problem for Predicativism Solved by Predicativism. Analysis 75 (3):362-370.
    Consider the following sentences: In every race, the colt won; In every race, John won.John Hawthorne and David Manley say that the difference between these two sentences raises a problem for Predicativism about names. According to the currently more standard version of Predicativism, a bare singular name in argument position, like ‘John’ in , is embedded in a definite description with an unpronounced definite article. The problem is supposed to be that permits a covarying reading (...)
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  38.  3
    John P. Anton (ed.) (1967). Naturalism and Historical Understanding: Essays on the Philosophy of John Herman Randall, Jr. State University of New York Press.
    " This volume has provided the rare opportunity to present related work of several eminent scholars in different fields. Most of the essays were written to honor Professor Randall on the occasion of his 65th birthday.
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  39.  6
    David McPherson & John Cottingham (2012). Philosophy, Spirituality, and the Good Life: An Interview with John Cottingham. Philosophy and Theology 24 (1):85-111.
    This interview with John Cottingham explores some major themes in his recent work in moral philosophy and the philosophy of religion. It begins by discussing his views on the task of philosophy and focuses particularly on philosophy’s role in achieving an overall view of the world and for understanding and achieving the good life. It also discusses some ‘limits of philosophy’ with respect to understanding and achieving the good life; i.e., some ways in which philosophical reflection on (...)
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  40.  17
    Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Reply to Critics: Josh Dever and John Hawthorne. Reply to Critics: Josh Dever and John Hawthorne:1-8.
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  41.  25
    Silke Ackermann & Louise Devoy (2012). 'The Lord of the Smoking Mirror': Objects Associated with John Dee in the British Museum. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (3):539-549.
    Six objects associated with the magic practices of John Dee have been held within the collections of the British Museum for many decades. These objects include three wax seals, an obsidian mirror, a gold disc and a crystal ball. In this paper we review the provenance and possible association of these artefacts with Dee by comparing their features to the descriptions and diagrams set out in Dee’s manuscripts. Although we come to the conclusion that a direct link (...)
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  42.  35
    Shannon Sullivan (2000). Reconfiguring Gender with John Dewey: Habit, Bodies, and Cultural Change. Hypatia 15 (1):23-42.
    : This paper demonstrates how John Dewey's notion of habit can help us understand gender as a constitutive structure of bodily existence. Bringing Dewey's pragmatism in conjunction with Judith Butler's concept of performativity, I provide an account of how rigid binary configurations of gender might be transformed at the level of both individual habit and cultural construct.
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  43. John Gardner & Allan Richard Chavkin (1990). Conversations with John Gardner.
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  44. John W. Yolton (1977). The Locke Reader: Selections From the Works of John Locke with a General Introduction and Commentary. Cambridge University Press.
    John Yolton seeks to allow readers of Locke to have accessible in one volume sections from a wide range of Locke's books, structured so that some of the interconnections of his thought can be seen and traced. Although Locke did not write from a system of philosophy, he did have in mind an overall division of human knowledge. The readings begin with Locke's essay on Hermeneutics and the portions of his Essay Concerning Human Understanding on how to read (...)
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  45. Charles Wallace (2003). Eating and Drinking with John Wesley: The Logic of His Practice. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 85 (2):137-155.
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  46.  46
    Dan Zeman (2013). Expereincer Phrases, Predicates of Personal Taste and Relativism: On Cappelen and Hawthorne's Critique of the Operator Argument. Croatian Journal of Philosophy (39):375-398.
    In the debate between relativism and contextualism about various expressions, the Operator Argument, initially proposed by Kaplan , has been taken to support relativism. However, one widespread reaction against the argument has taken the form of arguing against one assumption made by Kaplan: namely, that certain natural language expressions are best treated as sentential operators. Focusing on the only extant version of the Operator Argument proposed in connection to predicates of personal taste such as “tasty” and experiencer phrases such as (...)
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  47.  11
    T. E. Page (1892). An American Edition and Translation of Horace Horace, Edited with Explanatory Notes by Thomas Chase, LL.D. Philadelphia, Eldredge and Brother. Revised Edition, 1892; 1 Doll. 10c. Text Pp. 1—252, Notes 253—458. The Odes and Epodes of Horace, Translated Into English Verse with an Introduction and Notes and Latin Text by John B. Hague, Ph. D. New York: G. B. Putnam's Sons, 1892. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 6 (08):354-357.
    Horace, edited with Explanatory Notes by Thomas Chase, LL.D. Philadelphia, Eldredge and Brother. Revised Edition, 1892; 1 doll. 10c. Text pp. 1—252, Notes 253—458.The Odes and Epodes of Horace, translated into English Verse with an Introduction and Notes and Latin Text by John B. Hague, Ph. D. New York: G. B. Putnam's Sons, 1892.
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  48.  18
    Thomas R. Wells & John B. Davis (2012). Identity Problems: An Interview with John B. Davis. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 5 (2):81-103.
    In this interview, professor Davis discusses the evolution of his career and research interests as a philosopher-economist and gives his perspective on a number of important issues in the field. He argues that historians and methodologists of economics should be engaged in the practice of economics, and that historians should be more open to philosophical analysis of the content of economic ideas. He suggests that the history of recent economics is a particularly fruitful and important area for research exactly because (...)
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  49. G. E. Hughes (1985). John Buridan on Self-Reference: Chapter Eight of Buridan's Sophismata: With a Translation, an Introduction, and a Philosophical Commentary. Philosophical Review 94 (3):406-408.
    John Buridan was a fourteenth-century philosopher who enjoyed an enormous reputation for about two hundred years, was then totally neglected, and is now being 'rediscovered' through his relevance to contemporary work in philosophical logic. The final chapter of Buridan's Sophismata deals with problems about self-reference, and in particular with the semantic paradoxes. He offers his own distinctive solution to the well-known 'Liar Paradox' and introduces a number of other paradoxes that will be unfamiliar to most logicians. Buridan (...)
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  50. Günther Grewendorf & Georg Meggle (2002). Speech Acts, Mind, and Social Reality Discussions with John R. Searle. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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