Search results for 'Hermetic philosophers in literature' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & International Society for Phenomenology and Literature (1982). The Philosophical Reflection of Man in Literature Selected Papers From Several Conferences Held by the International Society for Phenomenology and Literature in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Marlies Kronegger, Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, World Institute for Advanced Phenomenological Research and Learning, International Society for Phenomenology and Literature & International Phenomenology Congress (1994). Allegory Old and New in Literature, Fine Art, Music and Theatre and its Continuity in Culture.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  26
    Catherine Osborne (2007). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press.
    The book is about three things. First, how Ancient thinkers perceived humans as like or unlike other animals; second about the justification for taking a humane attitude towards natural things; and third about how moral claims count as true, and how they can be discovered or acquired. Was Aristotle was right to see continuity in the psychological functions of animal and human souls? The question cannot be settled without taking a moral stance. As we can either focus on continuity or (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4. Elizabeth Holmes (1932). Henry Vaughan and the Hermetic Philosophy. New York, Russell & Russell.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Catherine Osborne (2007). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Animal rights do not feature explicitly in ancient thought. Indeed the notion of natural rights in general is not obviously present in the classical world. Plato and Aristotle are typically read as racist and elitist thinkers who barely recognise the humanity of their fellow humans. Surely they would be the last to show up as models of the humane view of other kinds?In this unusual philosophy book, Catherine Osborne asks the reader to think again. She shows that Plato's views on (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6. Catherine Osborne (2007). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This unusual philosophy book asks the reader to reconsider the received view that animal rights have no place in ancient thought. Catherine Osborne argues that by reflecting on the work of the ancient philosophers and poets, we can see when and how we lost touch with the natural intelligence of dumb animals.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Curt F. Bühler (1937). Greek Philosophers in the Literature of the Later Middle Ages. Speculum 12 (4):440-455.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  96
    D. Clough (2009). Book Review: Catherine Osborne, Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007). Xiii + 262 Pp. 42.00 (Hb), ISBN 978--0--19--928206--. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 22 (2):246-250.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Taneli Kukkonen (2007). Catherine Osborne, Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 27:432-434.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  68
    Richard Kamber (1977). Liars, Poets and Philosophers: The Assertions of Authors in Philosophy and Literature. British Journal of Aesthetics 17 (4):335-345.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  57
    Alice Crary (2009). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature – by Catherine Osborne. Philosophical Investigations 32 (2):191-197.
  12.  8
    William O. Stephens (2008). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Social Theory and Practice 34 (1):139-145.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  10
    John Dillon (2008). Osborne (C.) Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers. Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Pp. Xiv + 262. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2007. Cased, £40. ISBN: 978-0-19-928206-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 58 (01):76-78.
  14. Susan Lape (2008). Philosophy (C.) Osborne Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers. Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2007. Pp. Xi + 262. £40. 9780199282067. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 128:275-.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  15
    Jane Adamson, Richard Freadman & David Parker (eds.) (1998). Renegotiating Ethics in Literature, Philosophy, and Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    Is it possible for postmodernism to offer viable, coherent accounts of ethics? Or are our social and intellectual worlds too fragmented for any broad consensus about the moral life? These issues have emerged as some of the most contentious in literary and philosophical studies. In Renegotiating Ethics in Literature, Philosophy, and Theory a distinguished international gathering of philosophers and literary scholars address the reconceptualisations involved in this 'turn towards ethics'. An important feature of this has been a renewed (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  55
    George M. Wilson (2007). Elusive Narrators in Literature and Film. Philosophical Studies 135 (1):73 - 88.
    It is widely held in theories of narrative that all works of literary narrative fiction include a narrator who fictionally tells the story. However, it is also granted that the personal qualities of a narrator may be more or less radically effaced. Recently, philosophers and film theorists have debated whether movies similarly involve implicit audio-visual narrators. Those who answer affirmatively allow that these cinematic narrators will be radically effaced. Their opponents deny that audio-visual narrators figure in the ontology of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  17. Jürgen Daiber, Eva-Maria Konrad, Thomas Petraschka & Hans Rott (eds.) (2012). Understanding Fiction: Knowledge and Meaning in Literature. Mentis.
    The book addresses the questions how literature can convey knowledge and how literary meaning can arise in the face of the fact that fictional texts waive the usual claim to truth. Based on the interdisciplinary cooperation of literary scholars and analytic philosophers, the present anthology attempts a) to analyze the possibility and conditions of gaining knowledge through literature, and b) to apply, in a fruitful way, philosophical theories of meaning and interpretation to the constitution of meaning within (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Tracy Llanera (forthcoming). Of Private Selves and Public Morals: Philosophy and Literature in Modernity. In Philippa Kelly, Emily Finlay & Tom Clark (eds.), Worldmaking: Literature, Language, Culture. John Benjamins
    What is the moral, spiritual, and educative function of philosophy and literature in modern lives? Such a large question is rarely posed by philosophers or literary theorists these days, but one philosopher who has put it at the top of his agenda is Richard Rorty. His general answer is that both literature and philosophy serve distinct ends: the private end of personal fulfilment through the redescription of experiences and the possibility of self-creation, and the public end of (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. John Tyerman Williams (1996). Pooh and the Philosophers: In Which It is Shown That All of Western Philosophy is Merely a Preamble to Winnie-the-Pooh. Dutton Books.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Lewis Vaughn & Louis Pojman (eds.) (2010). The Moral Life: An Introductory Reader in Ethics and Literature. OUP USA.
    Now in its fourth edition, Louis P. Pojman and Lewis Vaughn's acclaimed The Moral Life: An Introductory Reader in Ethics and Literature brings together an extensive and varied collection of eighty-five classical and contemporary readings on ethical theory and practice. Integrating literature with philosophy in an innovative way, the book uses literary works to enliven and make concrete the ethical theory or applied issues addressed. Literary works by Angelou, Camus, Hawthorne, Huxley, Ibsen, Le Guin, Melville, Orwell, Styron, Tolstoy, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  21. Louis P. Pojman & Lewis Vaughn (eds.) (2007). The Moral Life: An Introductory Reader in Ethics and Literature. Oxford University Press.
    Featuring new selections chosen by coeditor Lewis Vaughn, the third edition of Louis P. Pojman's The Moral Life: An Introductory Reader in Ethics and Literature brings together an extensive and varied collection of ninety-one classical and contemporary readings on ethical theory and practice. Integrating literature with philosophy in an innovative way, the book uses literary works to enliven and make concrete the ethical theory or applied issues addressed in each chapter. Literary works by Camus, Hawthorne, Hugo, Huxley, Ibsen, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22.  7
    Douglas Chismar (2003). "Review of" The Heart of What Matters: The Role for Literature in Moral Philosophy". [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 4 (2):12.
    Philosophers have long suspected that in good literature, there is something of value to be found for doing philosophy. Plato, for example, delights in quoting the poets, despite his reservations about their social influence. As we have, more recently, sought to energize our teaching methods by supplementing lecture and discussion with novels and short stories, as well as film, music, and poetry, we may struggle with lingering suspicions about this expenditure of valuable class time or worries about whether (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  3
    Stephen M. Fallon (1991). Milton Among the Philosophers: Poetry and Materialism in Seventeenth-Century England. Cornell University Press.
    Introduction "Think only what concerns thee and thy being" — so Raphael admonishes Adam shortly before the fall in Paradise Lost (8.174). ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  20
    Yi Chen (2012). Semiosis of Translation in Wang Wei's and Paul Celan's Hermetic Poetry. Cultura 9 (2):87-102.
    Traditionally, comparative literature has focused on the study of influences between texts and it is only recent work that has explored the analogies and affinitiesof historically independent cultures. In this spirit, this paper develops methods for a structured poetic analysis and applies them to a systematic comparison of thepoem “Niǎo Mǐng Jiàn” from the 8th-century Chinese poet Wáng Wéi and the program piece of Paul Celan’s Atemwende: “Du Darfst,” based upon a detailed analysis of their poetics. The analysis and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  18
    Gil Anidjar (2002). "Our Place in Al-Andalus": Kabbalah, Philosophy, Literature in Arab Jewish Letters. Stanford University Press.
    The year 1492 is only the last in a series of “ends” that inform the representation of medieval Spain in modern Jewish historical and literary discourses. These ends simultaneously mirror the traumas of history and shed light on the discursive process by which hermetic boundaries are set between periods, communities, and texts. This book addresses the representation of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries as the end of al-Andalus (Islamic Spain). Here, the end works to locate and separate Muslim from (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  3
    David Davies & Carl Matheson (eds.) (2008). Contemporary Readings in the Philosophy of Literature: An Analytic Approach. Broadview Press.
    What, if anything, distinguishes works of fiction such as Hamlet and Madame Bovary from biographies, news reports, or office bulletins? Is there a "right" way to interpret fiction? Should we link interpretation to the author's intention? Ought our moral unease with works that betray sadistic, sexist, or racist elements lower our judgments of their aesthetic worth? And what, when it comes down to it, is literature? The readings in this collection bring together some of the most important recent work (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. James Grantham Turner (2003). Schooling Sex: Libertine Literature and Erotic Education in Italy, France, and England 1534-1685. Oxford University Press Uk.
    How did Casanova learn the theory of sex? Why did male pornographers write in the characters of women? What happens when philosophers take sexuality seriously and the sex-writers present their outrageous fantasies as an educational, philosophical quest? Schooling Sex is the first full history of early modern libertine literature and its reception, from Aretino and Tullia d'Aragona in 16th century Italy to Pepys, Rochester, and Behn in late 17th century England. James Turner explores the idea of sexual education, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Mark V. Kauppi & Paul R. Viotti (1998). The Global Philosophers: World Politics in Western Thought. Lexington Books.
    An excellent introduction to the field of international relations, The Global Philosophers examines the intellectual roots of contemporary literature on international relations and discusses the historical context in which famous historical political theorists wrote.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Peter Swirski (2006). Of Literature and Knowledge: Explorations in Narrative Thought Experiments, Evolution and Game Theory. Routledge.
    "_Of Literature and Knowledge_ looks... like an important advance in this new and very important subject... literature is about to become even more interesting." – Edward O. Wilson, Pellegrino University Professor, Harvard University. Framed by the theory of evolution, this colourful and engaging volume presents a new understanding of the mechanisms by which we transfer information from narrative make-believe to real life. Ranging across game theory and philosophy of science, as well as poetics and aesthetics, Peter Swirski explains (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Edmund J. Thomas (1990). Writers and Philosophers: A Sourcebook of Philosophical Influences on Literature. Greenwood Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. David Wills (ed.) (2008). The Gift of Death, Second Edition & Literature in Secret. University of Chicago Press.
    _The Gift of Death_, Jacques Derrida’s most sustained consideration of religion, explores questions first introduced in his book _Given Time_ about the limits of the rational and responsible that one reaches in granting or accepting death, whether by sacrifice, murder, execution, or suicide. Derrida analyzes Czech philosopher Jan Patocka’s _Heretical Essays in the Philosophy of History _and develops and compares his ideas to the works of Heidegger, Lévinas, and Kierkegaard. One of Derrida’s major works, _The Gift of Death_ resonates with (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  14
    S. Phineas Upham & Joshua Harlan (eds.) (2002). Philosophers in Conversation: Interviews From the Harvard Review of Philosophy. Routledge.
    This volume brings together for the first time thirteen recent interviews with the brightest names in contemporary philosophy, including W.V.O. Quine, Richard Rorty, Stanley Cavell, Hilary Putnam and John Rawls. The pieces are culled from the Harvard Review of Philosophy, which has operated at the core of Harvard's Philosophy Department since 1991. Covering wide range of topics from the philosophy of law to logic to metaphysics to literature, the interviews provide a fascinating introduction to some of the most influential (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. S. Upham Phineas (ed.) (2013). Philosophers in Conversation: Interviews From the Harvard Review of Philosophy. Routledge.
    This volume brings together 13 interviews with some of the brightest names in contemporary philosophy, including W.V.O. Quine, Richard Rorty, Stanley Cavell, Hilary Putnam, as well as John Rawls. Covering a wide range of topics from the philosophy of law and logic to metaphysics to literature, the interviews in this text provide an introduction to some of the most influential thinkers of the day.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  12
    Vitaly Gorokhov & Elena Trufanova (2014). Epistemology and the Philosophy of Science and Technology in Contemporary Russian Philosophy: A Survey of the Literature From the Late 1980s to the Present. Studies in East European Thought 66 (3 - 4):195-210.
    The present article provides an overview of the key subjects of scholarly research in the areas of epistemology and the philosophy of science and technology conducted in Russia between the 1980s and the present. These disciplines are shown to be deeply rooted in Soviet philosophy and still developed by contemporary Russian philosophers, with both the historical experience of the Russian philosophical thought and foreign conceptions and schools, classical as well as modern, drawn upon. The corollary is that epistemology and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Robert B. Pippin (2011). The Status of Literature in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. In Richard T. Gray, Nicholas Halmi, Gary Handwerk, Michael A. Rosenthal & Klaus Vieweg (eds.), Inventions of the Imagination: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Imaginary since Romanticism. University of Washington Press
    Hegel, in a chapter called “Absolute Knowing,” end his most exciting and original work, the Jena Phenomenology of Spirit, with a quotation, or rather a significant misquotation, of a poet? The poet is Schiller and the poem is his 1782 “Freundschaft” (Friendship). This immediately turns into two questions: Why are the last words not Hegel’s own, and why are they rather a poet’s? I will turn to the details in a moment but, as noted, such an inquiry may not be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Iris Murdoch & Gillian Dooley (2003). From a Tiny Corner in the House of Fiction Conversations with Iris Murdoch. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  37.  17
    Miklós Maróth (2002). The Changes of Metaphor in Arabic Literature. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 12 (2):241-255.
    Metaphor was based on similarity. During their history the Arabs adopted different logical systems in their scientific investigations. They shifted from Aristotle's logic accepted by the philosophers to that of the theologians and jurisconsults, and later again back to Aristotle's logic. In all these logical systems the definition of metaphor was dependent on the ever changing meaning of “similarity”. The seemingly unchanging definition of metaphor implies different interpretations in different ages parallel to the changing logical background.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Laura Inez Deavenport Barge (2009). Exploring Worldviews in Literature: From William Wordsworth to Edward Albee. Abilene Christian University Press.
    Numinous spaces in British literature from William Wordsworth to Samuel Beckett -- Jesus figures in American literature from Ralph Waldo Emerson to Edward Albee -- Using Bakhtin's definitions to discover ethical voices in Solzhenitsyn and Tolstoy -- René Girard's categories of scapegoats in literature of the American South -- Hopkins's metaphysics of nature as sacred disclosure -- The book of job as mirrored in Hopkins's metaphysics -- Beckett's mythos of the absence of God.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Alexander Dick & Christina Lupton (eds.) (2016). Theory and Practice in the Eighteenth Century: Writing Between Philosophy and Literature. Routledge.
    Brings together scholars who use literary interpretation and discourse analysis to read 18th-century British philosophy in its historical context. This work analyses how the philosophers of the Enlightenment viewed their writing; and, how their institutional positions as teachers and writers influenced their understanding of human consciousness.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  10
    Barry Smith (ed.) (1981). Structure and Gestalt: Philosophy and Literature in Austria-Hungary and Her Successor States. Benjamins.
    The majority of the papers in the present volume were presented at, or prepared in conjunction with, meetings of the Seminar for Austro-German Philosophy, a group of philosophers interested in the work of Brentano and Husserl and of the ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  28
    John Phelan (1999). Renegotiating Ethics In Literature, Philosophy And Theory. The Philosophers' Magazine 8 (8):56-56.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Michael Sayeau (2011). Ways of Knowing: The Wounded Animal: JM Coetzee and the Difficulty of Reality in Literature and Philosophy, Stephen Mulhall (Princeton University Press)£ 19.95. The Philosophers' Magazine 46:99-101.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  17
    Jorge J. E. Gracia, Carolyn Korsmeyer & Rodolphe Gasché (eds.) (2002). Literary Philosophers?: Borges, Calvino, Eco. Routledge.
    Borges, Calvino, and Eco are as noted for the intriguing philosophical puzzles they present as they are for their inventive literary styles. In their writings, sequences of causality are reversed, individuals switch identities, and stories of one person mirror those of others. Literary Philosophers brings together a group of distinguished philosophers, literary scholars, and comparativists to explore and debate the relationship between philosophy and literature in the works of these brilliant figures.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  32
    Ilsetraut Hadot (2007). Dans Quel Lieu le Néoplatonicien Simplicius a-T-Il Fondé Son École de Mathématiques, Et Où a Pu Avoir Lieu Son Entretien Avec Un Manichéen? International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 1 (1):42-107.
    The historian Agathias (Hist. II 30.3-31.4) relates that under the Emperor Justinian seven philosophers (Damascius, Simplicius, Eulamius, Priscianus, Hermeias, Diogenes, and Isidorus) sought refuge in Persia because of their own country's anti-pagan laws but that they ultimately returned in 532 to the Roman Empire. There have been many hypotheses about the fate of these philosophers after their return. Most recently M. Tardieu has argued that these philosophers went to Harran, a town that was located on the Persian (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Mary Sanders Pollock & Catherine Rainwater (eds.) (2005). Figuring Animals: Essays on Animal Images in Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Figuring Animals is a collection of fifteen essays concerning the representation of animals in literature, the visual arts, philosophy, and cultural practice. At the turn of the new century, it is helpful to reconsider our inherited understandings of the species, some of which are still useful to us. It is also important to look ahead to new understandings and new dialogue, which may contribute to the survival of us all. The contributors to this volume participate in this dialogue in (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  3
    Stanley Corngold (1998). Complex Pleasure: Forms of Feeling in German Literature. Stanford University Press.
    Complex Pleasure deals with questions of literary feeling in eight major German writers—Lessing, Kant, Hölderlin, Nietzsche, Musil, Kafka, Trakl, and Benjamin. On the basis of close readings of these authors Stanley Corngold makes vivid the following ideas: that where there is literature there is complex pleasure; that this pleasure is complex because it involves the impression of a disclosure; that this thought is foremost in the minds of a number of canonical writers; that important literary works in the German (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  7
    Hsuan L. Hsu (2010). Geography and the Production of Space in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgments; Introduction: scales of identification; 1. Democratic expansionism, gothic geographies, and Charles Brockden Brown; 2. Urban apartments, global cities: the enlargement of private space in Poe and James; 3. Cultural orphans: domesticity, missionaries, and China from Stowe to Sui Sin Far; 4. 'The Checkered Globe': cosmopolitan despair in the American Pacific; 5. Literature and regional production; Epilogue: scales of resistance.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Obioma Nnaemeka (ed.) (1997). The Politics of (M)Othering: Womanhood, Identity and Resistance in African Literature. Routledge.
    This collection is a study of African literature framed by the central, and multi-faceted, idea of 'mother' - motherland, mothertongue, motherwit, motherhood, mothering - looking at the paradoxical location of (m)other as both central and marginal. Whilst the volume stands as a sustained feminist analysis, it engages feminist theory itself by showing how issues in feminism are, in African literature, recast in different and complex ways.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  50
    Brett Bourbon (2004). Finding a Replacement for the Soul: Mind and Meaning in Literature and Philosophy. Harvard University Press.
    Approaching the study of literature as a unique form of the philosophy of language and mind--as a study of how we produce nonsense and imagine it as sense--this ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  23
    Phyllis Carey (ed.) (1997). Wagering on Transcendence: The Search for Meaning in Literature. Sheed & Ward.
    Through essays, Mount Mary College professors from various disciplines analyze several pieces of literature from a variety of genres and authors to show how ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000