Search results for 'Hermodorus of Syracuse' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Phillip Sidney Horky (2009). Persian Cosmos and Greek Philosophy: Plato's Associates and the Zoroastrian Magoi. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 37:47-103.
    Immediately upon the death of Plato in 347 BCE, philosophers in the Academy began to circulate stories involving his encounters with wisdom practitioners from Persia. This article examines the history of Greek perceptions of Persian wisdom and argues that the presence of foreign wisdom practitioners in the history of Greek philosophy has been undervalued since Diogenes Laertius.
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  2.  4
    Alexander Fuks (1968). Redistribution of Land and Houses in Syracuse in 356 B.C, and its Ideological Aspects. Classical Quarterly 18 (02):207-.
    The story of Dion of Syracuse was told by ancient writers, and is still being told by modern historians, in the main as a story of ‘freedom versus tyranny’. The liberation of the greatest state in the Hellenic world from the rule of the most powerful tyrants' house in Greek experience fired the imagination and aroused the admiration of contemporary and later writers. There is, however, another side to the story of Dion.
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  3.  4
    P. G., F. Haverfield & J. B. Jordan (1887). Topographical Model of Syracuse. Journal of Hellenic Studies 8:540.
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  4.  1
    H. W. Parke (1944). A Note on the Topography of Syracuse. Journal of Hellenic Studies 64:100.
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    R. G. Lewis (1989). Doctis, Iuppiter, Et Laboriosis L. J. Sanders: Dionysius I of Syracuse and Greek Tyranny. Pp. X + 189. London, New York and Sydney: Croom Helm, 1987. £25. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (02):285-286.
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  6.  7
    W. E. Heitland (1887). A Relief Map of Syracuse, Constructed Mainly After Holm and Cavallari. By J. B. Jordan and F. Haverfield, M.A. London. 1886. D. Nutt. £1 5s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 1 (2-3):73-.
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  7.  9
    H. D. Westlake (1959). Dionysius of Syracuse Karl Friedrich Stroheker: Dionysios I. Gestalt und Geschichte des Tyrannen von Syrakus. Pp. 263; 8 plates, map. Wiesbaden: Steiner, 1958. Cloth, DM. 24. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 9 (03):269-271.
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  8. Ersilia Francesca (2015). The Essentials of Ibāḍī Islam. By Valerie J. Hoffman. Modern Intellectual and Political History of the Middle East. Syracuse : Syracuse University Press, 2012. Pp. Xii + 344. $39.95. [REVIEW] Journal of the American Oriental Society 135 (2):399-401.
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  9.  3
    Jonnell A. Robinson, Evan Weissman, Susan Adair, Matthew Potteiger & Joaquin Villanueva (forthcoming). An Oasis in the Desert? The Benefits and Constraints of Mobile Markets Operating in Syracuse, New York Food Deserts. Agriculture and Human Values.
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  10.  6
    Marylou Martin (1986). Odo of Cheriton, The Fables of Odo of Cheriton, Ed. And Trans. John C. Jacobs. Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 1985. Pp. Xv, 197; Illustrated. [REVIEW] Speculum 61 (4):1031-1031.
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  11.  7
    Hans Meier-Welcker (1973). Syracuse. On the Topography and History of a Greek City. Philosophy and History 6 (2):195-197.
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  12.  4
    James E. McClellan (1980). Review of Thomas F. Green, Prepared with the Assistance of David P. Ericson and Robert H. Seidman, Predicting the Behavior of the Educational System (Syracuse: The University Press, 1980) 320 Pp. [REVIEW] Educational Theory 30 (4):353-366.
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  13.  5
    Thomas Butler (1991). Tatyana Popović;, Prince Marko: The Hero of South Slavic Epics. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1988. Pp. Xviii, 221; 11 Black-and-White Illustrations. $32. [REVIEW] Speculum 66 (2):465-466.
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  14.  12
    D. L. Drew (1929). A Study of the Moretum. (A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Arts and Literature in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts.) by Florence Louise Douglas. Pp. 169. Syracuse, N.Y. : Syracuse University, 1929. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (06):243-.
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  15.  6
    Alison B. Griffith (2013). P. Lulof, C. Rescigno Deliciae Fictiles IV. Architectural Terracottas in Ancient Italy. Images of Gods, Monsters and Heroes. Proceedings of the International Conference Held in Rome and Syracuse , October 21–25, 2009. Pp. Xiv + 634, Ills, Maps, Colour Pls. Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2011. Cased, £40, US$80. ISBN: 978-1-84217-426-5. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (1):243-245.
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  16.  5
    George Macdonald (1937). Greek Coins of Sicily Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum. Vol. II. The Lloyd Collection. Parts Vii-Viii. Syracuse to Lipara. By E. S. G. Robinson. Published for the British Academy. London: Milford, 1937. Paper, 15s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (04):129-130.
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  17.  2
    Peter W. Travis (2014). David K. Coley, The Wheel of Language: Representing Speech in Middle English Poetry, 1377–1422. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2012. Pp. 269. $29.95. ISBN: 9780815632733. [REVIEW] Speculum 89 (1):176-177.
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  18.  3
    Anne L. Clark (1997). Ulrike Wiethaus, Ecstatic Transformation: Transpersonal Psychology in the Work of Mechthild of Magdeburg. Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 1996. Pp. Vii, 195; 1 Table. $34.95 (Cloth); $16.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 72 (4):1220-1222.
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  19. New Directions In Relativity (1980). Phillip E. Parker Department of Mathematics Syracuse University Syracuse, New York. In A. R. Marlow (ed.), Quantum Theory and Gravitation. Academic Press
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  20. W. H. Walsh (1946). Reckoning With Life. By George Arthur Wilson, Formerly Abbott Professor of Philosophy, Syracuse University. (New York, Yale University Press. 1942. Pp. X + 311. Price $2.75.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 21 (78):92-.
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  21.  49
    I. M. Crombie (1962). An Examination of Plato's Doctrines. New York, Humanities Press.
    ... all probability, Plato's own statement; made indeed to be read by friends in Syracuse in explanation of the role he had played ...
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  22.  60
    Christine James (2015). Data Science and Mass Media: Seeking a Hermeneutic Ethics of Information. Proceedings of the Society for Phenomenology and Media, Vol. 15, 2014, Pages 49-58 15 (2014):49-58.
    In recent years, the growing academic field called “Data Science” has made many promises. On closer inspection, relatively few of these promises have come to fruition. A critique of Data Science from the phenomenological tradition can take many forms. This paper addresses the promise of “participation” in Data Science, taking inspiration from Paul Majkut’s 2000 work in Glimpse, “Empathy’s Impostor: Interactivity and Intersubjectivity,” and some insights from Heidegger’s "The Question Concerning Technology." The description of Data Science provided in the scholarly (...)
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  23.  25
    Michele Moody-Adams (2015). The Enigma of Forgiveness. Journal of Value Inquiry 49 (1-2):161-180.
    For at least two millennia, religious traditions, spiritual communities and secular moral thinkers have debated the nature and sources of forgiveness. But near the end of the twentieth century understanding forgiveness took on new urgency, as divided societies looked to forgiveness as a vehicle of reconciliation, governments sought forgiveness for past wrongs, and popular psychology explored the therapeutic effects of forgiveness. These developments have led to a remarkable increase in scholarship on forgiveness: philosophers examine its moral nature; psychologists seek to (...)
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  24.  51
    Ira Allen (2014). Rhetorical Humanism Vs. Object-Oriented Ontology: The Ethics of Archimedean Points and Levers. Substance 43 (3):67-87.
    Archimedes of Syracuse has long provided a touchstone for considering how we make and acquire knowledge. Since the early Roman chroniclers of Archimedes’ life, and especially intensively since Descartes, scholars have described, sought, or derided the Archimedean point, defining and redefining its epistemic role. “Knowledge,” at least within modernity, is rhetorically tied to the figure of the Archimedean point, a place somewhere outside a regular and constrained world of experience. If this figure still leads to useful ways of thinking (...)
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  25.  29
    Carl A. Huffman (2005). Archytas of Tarentum: Pythagorean, Philosopher, and Mathematician King. Cambridge University Press.
    Archytas of Tarentum was a central figure in fourth-century Greek life and thought and the last great philosopher in the early Pythagorean tradition. He solved a famous mathematical puzzle, saved Plato from the tyrant of Syracuse, led a powerful Greek city state, and was the subject of three books by Aristotle. This first extensive study of Archytas' work in any language presents a radically new interpretation of his significance for fourth-century Greek thought and his relationship to Plato, as well (...)
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  26.  9
    J. H. Hordern (1999). The Cyclops of Philoxenus. Classical Quarterly 49 (02):445-.
    Philoxenus of Cythera's dithyramb, Cyclops or Galatea, was a poem famous in antiquity as the source for the story of Polyphemus' love for the sea-nymph Galatea. The exact date of composition is uncertain, but the poem must pre-date 388 B.C., when it was parodied by Aristophanes in the parodos of Plutus , and probably, as we shall see below, post-dates 406, the point at which Dionysius I became tyrant of Syracuse . The Aristophanic parody of the work may well (...)
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  27.  12
    V. J. Gray (1986). Xenophon's Hiero and the Meeting of the Wise Man and Tyrant in Greek Literature. Classical Quarterly 36 (01):115-.
    The Hiero is an account in Socratic conversational form of a meeting between Simonides the poet and Hiero the tyrant of Syracuse; it was written by Xenophon of Athens in the fourth century b.c., but is set in the fifth, when the historical Simonides and Hiero lived and met. The subject they are portrayed discussing is the relative happiness of the tyrant and private individual. Plato also makes this a topic of discussion in his Republic. However, whereas Plato writes (...)
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  28.  6
    G. Burniston Brown (1940). Why Do Archimedes and Eddington Both Get 1079 for the Total Number of Particles in the Universe? Philosophy 15 (59):269-.
    There have been two attempts in the history of human speculation to estimate the number of particles in the universe. The first was that of Archimedes of Syracuse about 216 B. C., and the second that of Sir Arthur Eddington nearly two thousand years later. What is surprising is that they both arrive at the same number. This is the number obtained by multiplying ten by itself seventy-nine times.
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  29.  1
    Jocelyn Holland & Edgar Landgraf (2014). The Archimedean Point: From Fixed Positions to the Limits of Theory. Substance 43 (3):3-11.
    There is no authoritative biography of Archimedes, but there are moments from his life which, apocryphal or not, have become the stuff of legend. These include accounts of Archimedes running naked through the streets after realizing that his body displaces water in the bath , how he sat musing over diagrams in the sand as sword-bearing Romans descended upon him during a siege of Syracuse, and of course, his mechanically-informed claim that a firm resting place is all he would (...)
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  30.  6
    A. Andrewes (1949). The Corinthian Actaeon and Pheidon of Argos. Classical Quarterly 43 (1-2):70-.
    The story of Actaeon of Corinth is a slight, rationalized, romantic version of the original Boeotian myth, and as such has occasionally received a brief notice. In the Corinthian story Melissos his father had rescued Corinth from an attack by Pheidon of Argos, and was therefore held in great honour by the Corinthians. The boy Actaeon was torn to pieces not by his dogs but by bis drunken Bacchiad admirers, and after the murder Melissos, unable to get legal redress from (...)
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  31.  1
    Christiane Sourvinou (1974). The Votum of 477/6 B.C. And the Foundation Legend of Locri Epizephyrii. Classical Quarterly 24 (02):186-.
    The story of the votum made by the inhabitants of Locri Epizephyrii in 477/6 is well known: they vowed to prostitute their virgin daughters at the festival of Aphrodite, if they were granted victory over the tyrant Leophron of Rhegion who was directing an attack against their city. The threat, which was very serious, was overcome thanks to Hieron of Syracuse, but the Locrians did not fulfil the votum; they were reminded of it more than a century later, but (...)
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  32.  2
    E. Robbins (1990). The Gifts of the Gods: Pindar's Third Pythian. Classical Quarterly 40 (02):307-.
    Hieron of Syracuse was the most powerful Greek of his day. He was also, and the two facts are not unrelated, the most frequent of Pindar's patrons. A singular feature of the four poems for this Sicilian prince is their obsession with sin and punishment: Tantalus in the First Olympian, Typhoeus, Ixion, and Coronis in the first three Pythians – all offend divinity and suffer terribly. But even in this company, where glory comes trailing clouds of pain, the Third (...)
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  33.  27
    Donald C. Benson (1999). The Moment of Proof: Mathematical Epiphanies. Oxford University Press.
    When Archimedes, while bathing, suddenly hit upon the principle of buoyancy, he ran wildly through the streets of Syracuse, stark naked, crying "eureka!" In The Moment of Proof, Donald Benson attempts to convey to general readers the feeling of eureka--the joy of discovery--that mathematicians feel when they first encounter an elegant proof. This is not an introduction to mathematics so much as an introduction to the pleasures of mathematical thinking. And indeed the delights of this book are many and (...)
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  34. Matthew Skene (2013). Seemings and the Possibility of Epistemic Justification. Philosophical Studies 163 (2):539-559.
    Abstract I provide an account of the nature of seemings that explains why they are necessary for justification. The account grows out of a picture of cognition that explains what is required for epistemic agency. According to this account, epistemic agency requires (1) possessing the epistemic aims of forming true beliefs and avoiding errors, and (2) having some means of forming beliefs in order to satisfy those aims. I then argue that seeming are motives for belief characterized by their role (...)
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  35.  32
    Peter J. Rabinowitz (1977). Truth in Fiction: A Reexamination of Audiences. Critical Inquiry 4 (1):121-141.
    Questions about the status of literary truth are as old as literary criticism, but they have become both more intricate and more compelling as literature has grown progressively more self-conscious and labyrinthian in its dealings with "reality." One might perhaps read The Iliad or even David Copperfield without raising such issues. But authors like Gide , Nabokov, Borges, and Robbe-Grillet seem continually to remind their readers of the complex nature of literary truth. How, for instance, are we to deal with (...)
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  36.  18
    Jim Josefson & Jonathan Bach (1997). A Critique of Rawls's Hermeneutics as Translation. Philosophy and Social Criticism 23 (1):99-124.
    Syracuse University, NY, USA This paper seeks to demonstrate that hermeneutics is a powerful conceptual tool for exploring the current trend towards theorizing justice as a conversation. Specifically we explore the work of John Rawls in order to describe the particular variety of hermeneu tics at work in both 'political liberalism' and 'justice as fairness' and to critique this hermeneutics from the perspective of the ontological hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer. Using the critique of Quinean pragmatism found in Joseph Rouse's (...)
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  37.  1
    Stephen Melville (1987). Psychoanalysis and the Place of "Jouissance". Critical Inquiry 13 (2):349-370.
    Psychoanalysis has, in the very nature of its object, an interest in and difficulty with the concept of place as well as an interest in and difficulty with the logic of place, topology. The Unconscious can thus seem to give rise to a certain prospect of mathesis or formalization; and such formalization, achieved, would offer a ground for the psychoanalytic claim to scientific knowledge relatively independent of empirical questions and approaching the condition of mathematics. This might then seem to have (...)
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  38.  5
    J. Scott Turner (2012). The Thermodynamics of Life. Metascience 21 (2):371-373.
    The thermodynamics of life Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s11016-012-9651-8 Authors J. Scott Turner, SUNY, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  39.  1
    Robert Pinsky (1987). Responsibilities of the Poet. Critical Inquiry 13 (3):421-433.
    Certain general ideas come up repeatedly, in various guises, when contemporary poetry is discussed. One of these might be described as the question of what, if anything, is our social responsibility as poets.That is, there are things writers owe the art of poetry—work, perhaps. And in a sense there are things writers owe themselves—emotional truthfulness, attention toward one’s own feelings. But what, if anything, can a poet be said to owe other people in general, considered as a community? For what (...)
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  40.  2
    M. O. B. Caspari (1911). The Etruscans and the Sicilian Expedition of 414-413 B.C. Classical Quarterly 5 (02):113-.
    It has usually been held, on the strength of several passages in Thucydides, that the Athenian army which was besieging Syracuse in 414–413 b.c. contained a contingent of Etruscans desirous of retaliating upon the Syracusans for losses inflicted upon them in past days—e.g., in 474 at Cumae and in 453 at Elba.
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  41.  1
    P. J. Bicknell (1984). The Date of Timoleon's Crossing to Italy and the Comet of 361 B.C. Classical Quarterly 34 (01):130-.
    In the year of Eubulus' archonship at Athens , Timoleon the Corinthian, who had been chosen by his fellow citizens to command at Syracuse, prepared for his expedition to Sicily. He hired seven hundred mercenaries and having put his soldiers aboard four triremes and three fast sailing ships departed from Corinth. Following the coastal route he picked up three further ships from the Leucadians and Corcyreans and then with ten ships in all crossed the Ionian gulf to Italy. Thus (...)
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  42. R. S. Bluck (2013). Plato's Life and Thought (Rle: Plato): With a Translation of the Seventh Letter. Routledge.
    R. S. Bluck’s engaging volume provides an accessible introduction to the thought of Plato. In the first part of the book the author provides an account of the life of the philosopher, from Plato’s early years, through to the Academy, the first visit to Dionysius and the third visit to Syracuse, and finishing with an account of his final years. In the second part contains a discussion of the main purpose and points of interest of each of Plato’s works. (...)
     
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  43. R. S. Bluck (2012). Plato's Life and Thought : With a Translation of the Seventh Letter. Routledge.
    R. S. Bluck’s engaging volume provides an accessible introduction to the thought of Plato. In the first part of the book the author provides an account of the life of the philosopher, from Plato’s early years, through to the Academy, the first visit to Dionysius and the third visit to Syracuse, and finishing with an account of his final years. In the second part contains a discussion of the main purpose and points of interest of each of Plato’s works. (...)
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  44. R. S. Bluck (2013). Plato's Life and Thought : With a Translation of the Seventh Letter. Routledge.
    R. S. Bluck’s engaging volume provides an accessible introduction to the thought of Plato. In the first part of the book the author provides an account of the life of the philosopher, from Plato’s early years, through to the Academy, the first visit to Dionysius and the third visit to Syracuse, and finishing with an account of his final years. In the second part contains a discussion of the main purpose and points of interest of each of Plato’s works. (...)
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  45.  4
    Jeffry H. Morrison (2005). John Witherspoon and the Founding of the American Republic. University of Notre Dame Press.
    Jeffry H. Morrison offers readers the first comprehensive look at the political thought and career of John Witherspoon—a Scottish Presbyterian minister and one of America’s most influential and overlooked founding fathers. Witherspoon was an active member of the Continental Congress and was the only clergyman both to sign the Declaration of Independence and to ratify the federal Constitution. During his tenure as president of the College of New Jersey at Princeton, Witherspoon became a mentor to James Madison and influenced many (...)
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  46.  45
    John Raymond Boatright (2009). Ethics and the Conduct of Business. Pearson Prentice Hall.
    Ethics in the world of business -- Welfare, rights, and justice -- Equality, liberty, and virtue -- Whistle-blowing -- Trade secrets and conflict of interest -- Privacy -- Discrimination and affirmative action -- Employment rights -- Occupational health and safety -- Marketing, advertising, and product safety -- Ethics in finance -- Corporate social responsibility -- Corporate governance and accountability -- International business ethics.
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  47.  6
    Hans-Georg Gadamer & John McCumber (1989). Back From Syracuse? Critical Inquiry 15 (2):427-430.
    It has been claimed, out of admiration for the great thinker, that his political errors have nothing to do with his philosophy. If only we could be content with that! Wholly unnoticed was how damaging such a “defense” of so important a thinker really is. And how could it be made consistent with the fact that the same man, in the fifties, saw and said things about the industrial revolution and technology that today are still truly astonishing for their foresight?In (...)
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  48. Ben Bradley, Eternalism and Death's Badness Syracuse University.
    Suppose that at the moment of death, a person goes out of existence.1 This has been thought to pose a problem for the idea that death is bad for its victim. But what exactly is the problem? Harry Silverstein says the problem stems from the truth of the “Values Connect with Feelings” thesis (VCF), according to which it must be possible for someone to have feelings about a thing in order for that thing to be bad for that person (2000, (...)
     
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  49.  1
    J. G. Milne & E. S. G. Robinson (1938). Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum. II. The Lloyd Collection, Parts Vii-Viii, Syracuse to Lipara. III. The Lockett Collection, Part I, Spain-Italy. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 58:280.
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  50. Julia Kowalski (2009). Making Miss India Miss World: Constructing Gender, Power, and the Nation in Postliberalization India. Susan Dewey. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press. 2008. Ix+224pp. [REVIEW] Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 37 (1).
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