Search results for 'Hermodorus of Syracuse' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. P. G., F. Haverfield & J. B. Jordan (1887). Topographical Model of Syracuse. Journal of Hellenic Studies 8:540.score: 146.0
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  2. H. W. Parke (1944). A Note on the Topography of Syracuse. Journal of Hellenic Studies 64:100.score: 146.0
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  3. H. D. Westlake (1959). Dionysius of Syracuse Karl Friedrich Stroheker: Dionysios I. Gestalt und Geschichte des Tyrannen von Syrakus. Pp. 263; 8 plates, map. Wiesbaden: Steiner, 1958. Cloth, DM. 24. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 9 (03):269-271.score: 140.0
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  4. W. E. Heitland (1887). A Relief Map of Syracuse, Constructed Mainly After Holm and Cavallari. By J. B. Jordan and F. Haverfield, M.A. London. 1886. D. Nutt. £1 5s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 1 (2-3):73-.score: 140.0
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  5. R. G. Lewis (1989). Doctis, Iuppiter, Et Laboriosis L. J. Sanders: Dionysius I of Syracuse and Greek Tyranny. Pp. X + 189. London, New York and Sydney: Croom Helm, 1987. £25. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (02):285-286.score: 140.0
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  6. Alexander Fuks (1968). Redistribution of Land and Houses in Syracuse in 356 B.C, and its Ideological Aspects. Classical Quarterly 18 (02):207-.score: 120.0
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  7. James E. McClellan (1980). Review of Thomas F. Green, Prepared with the Assistance of David P. Ericson and Robert H. Seidman, Predicting the Behavior of the Educational System (Syracuse: The University Press, 1980) 320 Pp. [REVIEW] Educational Theory 30 (4):353-366.score: 120.0
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  8. D. L. Drew (1929). A Study of the Moretum. (A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Arts and Literature in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts.) by Florence Louise Douglas. Pp. 169. Syracuse, N.Y. : Syracuse University, 1929. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (06):243-.score: 120.0
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  9. Anne L. Clark (1997). Ulrike Wiethaus, Ecstatic Transformation: Transpersonal Psychology in the Work of Mechthild of Magdeburg. Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 1996. Pp. Vii, 195; 1 Table. $34.95 (Cloth); $16.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 72 (4):1220-1222.score: 120.0
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  10. Alison B. Griffith (2013). P. Lulof, C. Rescigno (Edd.) Deliciae Fictiles IV. Architectural Terracottas in Ancient Italy. Images of Gods, Monsters and Heroes. Proceedings of the International Conference Held in Rome (Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia, Royal Netherlands Institute) and Syracuse (Museo Archeologico Regionale 'Paolo Orsi'), October 21–25, 2009. Pp. Xiv + 634, Ills, Maps, Colour Pls. Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2011. Cased, £40, US$80. ISBN: 978-1-84217-426-5. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (1):243-245.score: 120.0
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  11. George Macdonald (1937). Greek Coins of Sicily Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum. Vol. II. The Lloyd Collection. Parts Vii-Viii. Syracuse to Lipara. By E. S. G. Robinson. Published for the British Academy. London: Milford, 1937. Paper, 15s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (04):129-130.score: 120.0
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  12. Thomas Butler (1991). Tatyana Popović;, Prince Marko: The Hero of South Slavic Epics. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1988. Pp. Xviii, 221; 11 Black-and-White Illustrations. $32. [REVIEW] Speculum 66 (2):465-466.score: 120.0
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  13. Marylou Martin (1986). Odo of Cheriton, The Fables of Odo of Cheriton, Ed. And Trans. John C. Jacobs. Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 1985. Pp. Xv, 197; Illustrated. [REVIEW] Speculum 61 (4):1031-1031.score: 120.0
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  14. Hans Meier-Welcker (1973). Syracuse. On the Topography and History of a Greek City. Philosophy and History 6 (2):195-197.score: 120.0
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  15. Bat-Ami Bar On, Laura Cannon & Ann Ferguson (2005). Linda Martin Alcoff is a Professor of Philosophy, Women's Studies, and Polit-Ical Science at Syracuse University. She Received Her Ph. D. At Brown Univer-Sity in 1987. She Publishes in the Areas of Epistemology and Social Identity. Barbara S. Andrew is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at William Paterson University. She has Published Articles on Simone de Beau Voir, Feminist. [REVIEW] In Barbara S. Andrew, Jean Clare Keller & Lisa H. Schwartzman (eds.), Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 120.0
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  16. New Directions In Relativity (1980). Phillip E. Parker Department of Mathematics Syracuse University Syracuse, New York. In A. R. Marlow (ed.), Quantum Theory and Gravitation. Academic Press.score: 120.0
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  17. Peter W. Travis (2014). David K. Coley, The Wheel of Language: Representing Speech in Middle English Poetry, 1377–1422. (Medieval Studies.) Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2012. Pp. 269. $29.95. ISBN: 9780815632733. [REVIEW] Speculum 89 (1):176-177.score: 120.0
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  18. W. H. Walsh (1946). Reckoning With Life. By George Arthur Wilson, Formerly Abbott Professor of Philosophy, Syracuse University. (New York, Yale University Press. 1942. Pp. X + 311. Price $2.75.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 21 (78):92-.score: 120.0
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  19. Michele Moody-Adams (forthcoming). The Enigma of Forgiveness. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-20.score: 60.0
    For at least two millennia, religious traditions, spiritual communities and secular moral thinkers have debated the nature and sources of forgiveness. But near the end of the twentieth century understanding forgiveness took on new urgency, as divided societies looked to forgiveness as a vehicle of reconciliation, governments sought forgiveness for past wrongs, and popular psychology explored the therapeutic effects of forgiveness. These developments have led to a remarkable increase in scholarship on forgiveness: philosophers examine its moral nature; psychologists seek to (...)
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  20. Carl A. Huffman (2005). Archytas of Tarentum: Pythagorean, Philosopher, and Mathematician King. Cambridge University Press.score: 58.0
    Archytas of Tarentum was a central figure in fourth-century Greek life and thought and the last great philosopher in the early Pythagorean tradition. He solved a famous mathematical puzzle, saved Plato from the tyrant of Syracuse, led a powerful Greek city state, and was the subject of three books by Aristotle. This first extensive study of Archytas' work in any language presents a radically new interpretation of his significance for fourth-century Greek thought and his relationship to Plato, as well (...)
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  21. Donald C. Benson (1999). The Moment of Proof: Mathematical Epiphanies. Oxford University Press.score: 58.0
    When Archimedes, while bathing, suddenly hit upon the principle of buoyancy, he ran wildly through the streets of Syracuse, stark naked, crying "eureka!" In The Moment of Proof, Donald Benson attempts to convey to general readers the feeling of eureka--the joy of discovery--that mathematicians feel when they first encounter an elegant proof. This is not an introduction to mathematics so much as an introduction to the pleasures of mathematical thinking. And indeed the delights of this book are many and (...)
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  22. Matthew Skene (2013). Seemings and the Possibility of Epistemic Justification. Philosophical Studies 163 (2):539-559.score: 54.0
    Abstract I provide an account of the nature of seemings that explains why they are necessary for justification. The account grows out of a picture of cognition that explains what is required for epistemic agency. According to this account, epistemic agency requires (1) possessing the epistemic aims of forming true beliefs and avoiding errors, and (2) having some means of forming beliefs in order to satisfy those aims. I then argue that seeming are motives for belief characterized by their role (...)
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  23. I. M. Crombie (1962). An Examination of Plato's Doctrines. New York, Humanities Press.score: 54.0
    ... all probability, Plato's own statement; made indeed to be read by friends in Syracuse in explanation of the role he had played ...
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  24. Jim Josefson & Jonathan Bach (1997). A Critique of Rawls's Hermeneutics as Translation. Philosophy and Social Criticism 23 (1):99-124.score: 54.0
    Syracuse University, NY, USA This paper seeks to demonstrate that hermeneutics is a powerful conceptual tool for exploring the current trend towards theorizing justice as a conversation. Specifically we explore the work of John Rawls in order to describe the particular variety of hermeneu tics at work in both 'political liberalism' and 'justice as fairness' and to critique this hermeneutics from the perspective of the ontological hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer. Using the critique of Quinean pragmatism found in Joseph Rouse's (...)
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  25. J. Scott Turner (2012). The Thermodynamics of Life. Metascience 21 (2):371-373.score: 54.0
    The thermodynamics of life Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s11016-012-9651-8 Authors J. Scott Turner, SUNY, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  26. R. S. Bluck (2013). Plato's Life and Thought (Rle: Plato): With a Translation of the Seventh Letter. Routledge.score: 54.0
    R. S. Bluck’s engaging volume provides an accessible introduction to the thought of Plato. In the first part of the book the author provides an account of the life of the philosopher, from Plato’s early years, through to the Academy, the first visit to Dionysius and the third visit to Syracuse, and finishing with an account of his final years. In the second part contains a discussion of the main purpose and points of interest of each of Plato’s works. (...)
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  27. Ben Bradley, Eternalism and Death's Badness Syracuse University.score: 36.0
    Suppose that at the moment of death, a person goes out of existence.1 This has been thought to pose a problem for the idea that death is bad for its victim. But what exactly is the problem? Harry Silverstein says the problem stems from the truth of the “Values Connect with Feelings” thesis (VCF), according to which it must be possible for someone to have feelings about a thing in order for that thing to be bad for that person (2000, (...)
     
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  28. J. G. Milne & E. S. G. Robinson (1938). Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum. II. The Lloyd Collection, Parts Vii-Viii, Syracuse to Lipara. III. The Lockett Collection, Part I, Spain-Italy. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 58:280.score: 36.0
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  29. James Schmidt (2011). Misunderstanding the Question: 'What is Enlightenment?': Venturi, Habermas, and Foucault. History of European Ideas 37 (1):43-52.score: 30.0
    In his 1969 Trevelyan Lectures, Franco Venturi argued that Kant's response to the question ?What is Enlightenment?? has tended to promote a ?philosophical interpretation? of the Enlightenment that leads scholars away from the political questions that were central to its concerns. But while Kant's response is well known, it has been often misunderstood by scholars who see it as offering a definition of an historical period, rather than an attempt at characterizing a process that had a significant implications. This article (...)
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  30. Plato (1973/2009). Phaedrus: And, The Seventh and Eighth Letters. Penguin Classics.score: 28.0
    This volume also contains two of his letters, which discuss his involvement in politics, in particular his role as adviser to Dionysius II of Syracuse, which ...
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  31. Janet Borgerson & Jonathan Schroeder (2002). Ethical Issues of Global Marketing: Avoiding Bad Faith in Visual Representation. European Journal of Marketing 36 (5/6):570-594.score: 27.0
    This paper examines visual representation from a distinctive, interdisciplinary perspective that draws on ethics, visual studies and critical race theory. Suggests ways to clarify complex issues of representational ethics in marketing communications and marketing representations, suggesting an analysis that makes identity creation central to societal marketing concerns. Analyzes representations of the exotic Other in disparate marketing campaigns, drawing upon tourist promotions, advertisements, and mundane objects in material culture. Moreover, music is an important force in marketing communication: visual representations in music (...)
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  32. Stephen Mumford & Rani Lill Anjum (2010). A Powerful Theory of Causation. In Anna Marmodoro (ed.), The Metaphysics of Powers: Their Grounding and Their Manifestations. Routledge. 143--159.score: 27.0
    Hume thought that if you believed in powers, you believed in necessary connections in nature. He was then able to argue that there were none such because anything could follow anything else. But Hume wrong-footed his opponents. A power does not necessitate its manifestations: rather, it disposes towards them in a way that is less than necessary but more than purely contingent. -/- In this paper a dispositional theory of causation is offered. Causes dispose towards their effects and often produce (...)
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  33. Fernando Martínez-Manrique & Agustin Vicente (2010). What The...! The Role of Inner Speech in Conscious Thought. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (9-10):141-67.score: 27.0
    Abstract: Introspection reveals that one is frequently conscious of some form of inner speech, which may appear either in a condensed or expanded form. It has been claimed that this speech reflects the way in which language is involved in conscious thought, fulfilling a number of cognitive functions. We criticize three theories that address this issue: Bermúdez’s view of language as a generator of second-order thoughts, Prinz’s development of Jackendoff’s intermediate-level theory of consciousness, and Carruthers’s theory of inner speech as (...)
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  34. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2001). The Poverty of the Stimulus Argument. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (2):217-276.score: 27.0
    Noam Chomsky's Poverty of the Stimulus Argument is one of the most famous and controversial arguments in the study of language and the mind. Though widely endorsed by linguists, the argument has met with much resistance in philosophy. Unfortunately, philosophical critics have often failed to fully appreciate the power of the argument. In this paper, we provide a systematic presentation of the Poverty of the Stimulus Argument, clarifying its structure, content, and evidential base. We defend the argument against a variety (...)
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  35. Stacie Friend (2007). The Pleasures of Documentary Tragedy. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):184-198.score: 27.0
    Two assumptions are common in discussions of the paradox of tragedy: (1) that tragic pleasure requires that the work be fictional or, if non-fiction, then non-transparently represented; and (2) that tragic pleasure may be provoked by a wide variety of art forms. In opposition to (1) I argue that certain documentaries could produce tragic pleasure. This is not to say that any sad or painful documentary could do so. In considering which documentaries might be plausible candidates, I further argue, against (...)
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  36. Tuomas E. Tahko (2009). The Law of Non-Contradiction as a Metaphysical Principle. Australasian Journal of Logic 7:32-47.score: 27.0
    The goals of this paper are two-fold: I wish to clarify the Aristotelian conception of the law of non-contradiction as a metaphysical rather than a semantic or logical principle, and to defend the truth of the principle in this sense. First I will explain what it in fact means that the law of non-contradiction is a metaphysical principle. The core idea is that the law of non-contradiction is a general principle derived from how things are in the world. For example, (...)
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  37. David J. Chalmers (1996). The Conscious Mind: In Search of a Fundamental Theory. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    The book is an extended study of the problem of consciousness. After setting up the problem, I argue that reductive explanation of consciousness is impossible (alas!), and that if one takes consciousness seriously, one has to go beyond a strict materialist framework. In the second half of the book, I move toward a positive theory of consciousness with fundamental laws linking the physical and the experiential in a systematic way. Finally, I use the ideas and arguments developed earlier to defend (...)
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  38. Jan C. Westerhoff (2001). A World of Signs: Baroque Pansemioticism, the Polyhistor and the Early Modern Wunderkammer. Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (4):633-650.score: 27.0
    This paper is an attempt to argue that there existed a very prominent view of signs and signification in late sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe which can help us to understand several puzzling aspects of baroque culture. This view, called here "pansemioticism," constituted a fundamental part of the baroque conception of the world. After sketching the content and importance of pansemioticism, I will show how it can help us to understand the (from a modern perspective) rather puzzling concept of the polymath, (...)
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  39. Gregor Damschen & Dieter Schönecker (2006). Saving Seven Embryos or Saving One Child? Michael Sandel on the Moral Status of Human Embryos. Journal of Philosophical Research (Ethics and the Life Sciences):239-245.score: 27.0
    Suppose a fire broke out in a fertility clinic. One had time to save either a young girl, or a tray of ten human embryos. Would it be wrong to save the girl? According to Michael Sandel, the moral intuition is to save the girl; what is more, one ought to do so, and this demonstrates that human embryos do not possess full personhood, and hence deserve only limited respect and may be killed for medical research. We will argue, however, (...)
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  40. Phillip Bricker (2006). David Lewis: On the Plurality of Worlds. In John Shand (ed.), Central Works of Philosophy, Vol. 5: The Twentieth Century: Quine and After. Acumen Publishing.score: 27.0
    David Lewis's book 'On the Plurality of Worlds' mounts an extended defense of the thesis of modal realism, that the world we inhabit the entire cosmos of which we are a part is but one of a vast plurality of worlds, or cosmoi, all causally and spatiotemporally isolated from one another. The purpose of this article is to provide an accessible summary of the main positions and arguments in Lewis's book.
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  41. Andrew Chignell, The Ethics of Belief. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 27.0
    The “ethics of belief” refers to a cluster of questions at the intersection of epistemology, philosophy of mind, psychology, and ethics. The central question in the debate is whether there are norms of some sort governing our habits of belief formation, belief maintenance, and belief relinquishment. Is it ever or always morally wrong (or epistemically irrational, or imprudent) to hold a belief on insufficient evidence? Is it ever or always morally right (or epistemically rational, or prudent) to believe on the (...)
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  42. Nicholas Maxwell (1993). Induction and Scientific Realism: Einstein Versus Van Fraassen Part One: How to Solve the Problem of Induction. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (1):61-79.score: 27.0
    In this three-part paper, my concern is to expound and defend a conception of science, close to Einstein's, which I call aim-oriented empiricism. I argue that aim-oriented empiricsim has the following virtues. (i) It solve the problem of induction; (ii) it provides decisive reasons for rejecting van Fraassen's brilliantly defended but intuitively implausible constructive empiricism; (iii) it solves the problem of verisimilitude, the problem of explicating what it can mean to speak of scientific progress given that science advances from one (...)
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  43. Holly Lawford-Smith (2012). The Feasibility of Collectives' Actions. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (3):453-467.score: 27.0
    Does ?ought? imply ?can? for collectives' obligations? In this paper I want to establish two things. The first, what a collective obligation means for members of the collective. The second, how collective ability can be ascertained. I argue that there are four general kinds of obligation, which devolve from collectives to members in different ways, and I give an account of the distribution of obligation from collectives to members for each of these kinds. One implication of understanding collective obligation and (...)
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  44. Sagar Sanyal (2012). A Defence of Democratic Egalitarianism. Journal of Philosophy 109 (7):413-34.score: 27.0
    This is a constructive response to a 2008 article by Kok-Chor Tan. It outlines a version of democratic egalitarianism to complement, rather than compete against, luck egalitarianism. The concepts of autonomy and domination are used to elaborate democratic equality, and I suggest a broadening in the understandings of distributive justice; of why distributive justice matters; and of the concepts of grounding and substantive principles (in relation to distributive justice).
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  45. Seungbae Park (2011). Defence of Cultural Relativism. Cultura. International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology 8 (1):159-170.score: 27.0
    I attempt to rebut the following standard objections against cultural relativism: 1. It is self-defeating for a cultural relativist to take the principle of tolerance as absolute; 2. There are universal moral rules, contrary to what cultural relativism claims; 3. If cultural relativism were true, Hitler’s genocidal actions would be right, social reformers would be wrong to go against their own culture, moral progress would be impossible, and an atrocious crime could be made moral by forming a culture which approves (...)
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  46. Joseph A. Hedger & William V. Fabricius (2011). True Belief Belies False Belief: Recent Findings of Competence in Infants and Limitations in 5-Year-Olds, and Implications for Theory of Mind Development. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (3):429-447.score: 27.0
    False belief tasks have enjoyed a monopoly in the research on children’s development of a theory of mind. They have been granted this status because they promise to deliver an unambiguous assessment of children’s understanding of the representational nature of mental states. Their poor cousins, true belief tasks, have been relegated to occasional service as control tasks. That this is their only role has been due to the universal assumption that correct answers on true belief tasks are inherently ambiguous regarding (...)
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  47. Christopher E. Cosans (1997). Galen's Critique of Rationalist and Empiricist Anatomy. Journal of the History of Biology 30 (1):35 - 54.score: 27.0
    This article explores Galen's analysis of and response to the Rationalist and Empiricist medical sects. It argues that his interest in their debate concerning the epistemology of medicine and anatomy was key to his advancement of an experimental methodology.
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  48. Chris Swoyer (1982). The Nature of Natural Laws. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 60 (3):203 – 223.score: 27.0
    That laws of nature play a vital role in explanation, prediction, and inductive inference is far clearer than the nature of the laws themselves. My hope here is to shed some light on the nature of natural laws by developing and defending the view that they involve genuine relations between properties. Such a position is suggested by Plato, and more recent versions have been sketched by several writers.~ But I am not happy with any of these accounts, not so much (...)
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  49. James R. Beebe, Logical Problem of Evil. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 27.0
    The existence of evil and suffering in our world seems to pose a serious challenge to belief in the existence of a perfect God. If God were all-knowing, it seems that God would know about all of the horrible things that happen in our world. If God were all-powerful, God would be able to do something about all of the evil and suffering. Furthermore, if God were morally perfect, then surely God would want to do something about it. And yet (...)
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  50. Ralf M. Bader (2009). Kant and the Categories of Freedom. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (4):799-820.score: 27.0
    This paper provides an account of Kant's categories of freedom, explaining how they fit together and what role they are supposed to play. My interpretation places particular emphasis on the structural features that the table of the categories of freedom shares with the table of judgements and the table of categories laid out by Kant in the Critique of Pure Reason. In this way we can identify two interpretative constraints, namely (i) that the categories falling under each heading must form (...)
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