Search results for 'Heroes' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ronald G. Finch (1972). Heroes in Germany Ancient and Modern. Belfast,Queen's University.
     
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  2. Michael Alan Kagan (1994). Educating Heroes: The Implications of Ernest Becker's Depth Psychology of Heroism for Philosophy of Education. Hollowbrook Pub..
     
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  3. Susan Rechter (1993). Reviews : Peter Beilharz (Ed.), Social Theory: A Guide to Central Thinkers (Sydney, Allen and Unwin, 1992); Peter Beilharz, Heroes and Pedestrians: Social Theory in Sociology, Latrobe University Sociology Paper No. 17 (1991). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 35 (1):127-132.
    Reviews : Peter Beilharz , Social Theory: A Guide to Central Thinkers ; Peter Beilharz, Heroes and Pedestrians: Social Theory in Sociology, Latrobe University Sociology Paper No. 17.
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  4.  27
    Jamee Gresley, Heidi Wallace, Julie M. Hupp & Sara Staats (2009). Heroes Don't Cheat: An Examination of Academic Dishonesty and Students' Views on Why Professors Don't Report Cheating. Ethics and Behavior 19 (3):171-183.
    Some students do not cheat. Students high in measures of bravery, honesty, and empathy, our defining characteristics of heroism, report less past cheating than other students. These student heroes also reported that they would feel more guilt if they cheated and also reported less intent to cheat in the future than nonheroes. We find general consensus between students and professors as to reasons for the nonreporting of cheating, suggesting a general impression of insufficient evidence, lack of courage, and denial. (...)
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  5.  12
    Andrea Talabér (2014). Medieval Saints and Martyrs as Communist Villains and Heroes: National Days in Czechoslovakia and Hungary During Communism. History of Communism in Europe 5:168-192.
    This paper examines the transformation of medieval figures from state “heroes” during the interwar years into “villains” of the Communist state in Czechoslovakia and Hungary through their national day commemorations. I argue that the negative treatment of these medieval heroes was not clear-cut and, especially in Hungary, they enjoyed a comeback of sorts during the second half of the Communist era. This article thus demonstrates, through official commemorative events, that the Communist regimes of Czechoslovakia and Hungary to some (...)
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  6.  38
    Adam Morton (2009). Good Citizens and Moral Heroes. In Pedro Alexis Tabensky (ed.), The Positive Function of Evil. Palgrave Macmillan
    Scale matters in morality, so that different factors occupy us at high and low scales. Different people are needed to be good neighbours in everyday life and moral heroes in crises. There is no reason to believe that the same traits are required for both. So there is no such thing as the all-round good person.
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  7.  16
    F. Baylis (2004). The Olivieri Debacle: Where Were the Heroes of Bioethics? Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (1):44-49.
    All Canadian bioethicists need to reflect on the meaning and value of their work, to see more clearly how the ethics of bioethics is being undermined from within. In the case involving Dr Olivieri, the Hospital for Sick Children, the University of Toronto, and Apotex Inc, there were countless opportunities for bioethical heroism. And yet, no bioethics heroes emerged from this case. Much has been written about the hospital’s and the university’s failures in this case. But what about the (...)
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  8.  3
    Markus Meckl (2016). Latvia’s Vanished National Heroes. The European Legacy 21 (4):408-418.
    The nineteenth century saw the invention of the national hero. His main function was to serve as an ideal for the nation. Latvia, however, is an exception to this general rule: after it regained independence in 1990, the national hero simply disappeared and no heroic image emerged. On the contrary, it was now the victim that became the emblem of Latvia’s regained independence. The country, of course, did not lack “heroes,” for there were in fact many candidates for the (...)
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  9.  5
    Daniel J. Kruger, Maryanne Fisher & Ian Jobling (2003). Proper and Dark Heroes as DADS and CADS. Human Nature 14 (3):305-317.
    Empirical tests described in this article support hypotheses derived from evolutionary theory on the perceptions of literary characters. The proper and dark heroes in British Romantic literature of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries respectively represent long-term and short-term mating strategies. Recent studies indicate that for long-term relationships, women seek partners with the ability and willingness to sustain paternal investment in extended relationships. For short-term relationships, women choose partners whose features indicate high genetic quality. In hypothetical scenarios, females (...)
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  10.  35
    Yogendra Chopra (1963). Professor Urmson on 'Saints and Heroes'. Philosophy 38 (144):160 - 166.
    In a paper entitled ‘Saints and Heroes’ 1 Professor J. O. Urmson has criticised ‘the trichotomy of duties, indifferent actions, and wrongdoing’ , commonly found in moral philosophy, on the ground that it fails to cover an important class of actions, of which saintly and heroic actions are ‘conspicuous” but by no means the only examples. I am inclined to think that this trichotomy is defensible, and that at least it deserves a much longer run for its money than (...)
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  11.  5
    Mark Learmonth (2001). NHS Trust Chief Executives as Heroes? Health Care Analysis 9 (4):417-436.
    This paper presents a reading of the transcripts of interviews withNHS Trust Chief Executives. Using a poststructuralist understanding ofthe interviews, it privileges a reading that (ironically) representsthese Chief Executives as heroes. Following the classic hero story line,they leave the civilized order of home and journey into a threateningwilderness where they encounter dangerous and magical things butovercome them all because of their masculine characteristics such asrationality, strength and resourcefulness. One way in which thesestories can be understood to have significance is (...)
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  12.  13
    Richard Gaskin (1990). Do Homeric Heroes Make Real Decisions? Classical Quarterly 40 (01):1-.
    Bruno Snell has made familiar a certain thesis about the Homeric poems, to the effect that these poems depict a primitive form of mindedness. The area of mindedness concerned is agency, and the content of the thesis is that Homeric agents are not agents in the fullest sense: they do not make choices in clear self-awareness of what they are doing; choices are made for them rather than by them; in some cases the instigators of action are gods, in other (...)
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  13.  21
    Steven H. White (1999). What is a Hero? An Exploratory Study of Students' Conceptions of Heroes. Journal of Moral Education 28 (1):81-95.
    This article examines the responses given by 590 kindergarten to 12th-Grade students when they were asked about their conception of heroes. The sequence of questions asked students to define, describe, name, and justify their response about heroes. Students, regardless of age level, appear to use an operational definition of hero, but when asked to identify a hero, most students named a person with whom they have had personal experiences. Responses given over the age spans move from a specific (...)
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  14.  2
    Roberta Frank (2014). Conversational Skills for Heroes. In Heike Sahm & Victor Millet (eds.), Narration and Hero: Recounting the Deeds of Heroes in Literature and Art of the Early Medieval Period. De Gruyter 19-44.
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  15.  3
    Robert Powell (2009). Embracing Power Roles Naturally: Rand's Nietzschean Heroes and Villains. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 10 (2):371 - 398.
    Because of Ayn Rand's problematic moral labels on her characters, Gail Wynand, not Howard Roark, should be her true Nietzschean hero. Wynand meets the criteria of both the Nietzschean Superman and Rand's Objectivism. Roark's false integrity taints his greatness and improperly vulgarizes him as a Nietzschean Superman. Rand problematically wants her heroes to accept the greatness of the Übermensch, but reject his natural existence and will to power. Dominique Francon should be her true Nietzschean villain, because, unlike Ellsworth Toohey, (...)
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  16.  1
    Elizabeth M. Pybus (1982). ‘Saints and Heroes’: Elizabeth M. Pybus. Philosophy 57 (220):193-199.
    In his article ‘Saints and Heroes’, Urmson argues that traditional moral theories allow at most for a threefold classification of actions in terms of their worth, and that they are therefore unsatisfactory. Since the conclusion of his argument has led to the widespread use of the term ‘acts of supererogation’, and since I do not believe that such acts exist, I propose to argue that the actions with which he is concerned not only can, but should, be contained within (...)
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  17.  2
    Margaretha Kramer-Hajos (2012). The Land and the Heroes of Lokris in the Iliad. Journal of Hellenic Studies 132 (1):87-105.
    The presentation of Lokris and the Lokrians in the Iliad is problematic. The entry for Lokris in the Catalogue lists an unusually large number of towns for such a small area, but many of those towns are obscure. Despite the small size of the region of Lokris, it has given the epic not one but two major heroes of very different characters: the Lokrian commander Oilean Aias and Patroklos, Achilles' friend and warrior companion. Although Aias is praised in the (...)
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  18.  1
    Mary Tiles (1990). Of Heroes and Butterflies: Technological Dreams and Human Realities. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 4 (1):89 – 100.
    Abstract Since the seventeenth century the dream of rendering human life less arduous and of securing it against the whims of fate through the development and deployment of technological devices has been a factor stimulating scientific research and development. This dream rests on a supposition that we live in a universe governed by deterministic laws in which limits on our ability to predict and control are set only by the imperfection of our knowledge and skill. But recent work in chaos (...)
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  19. Edward P. Butler (2014). Time and the Heroes. Walking the Worlds: A Biannual Journal of Polytheism and Spiritwork 1 (1):23-44.
    The Platonist Proclus (c. 412-485 CE) identifies the procession of the angels, daimons, and heroes as operating three universal temporal potencies through which we experience time in the forms of past, present, and future, respectively. This essay explicates the Proclean doctrine of the three forms of time in its context within his system and its wider implications, with particular reference to the form of temporality associated with the heroes. Proclus’ schematic account of heroic temporality offers a systematic metaphysical (...)
     
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  20. Eladio Chávarri (2003). La humanidad de nuestros héroes. Estudios Filosóficos 52 (151):445-476.
    En el mes de Abril de este mismo año 2003, el semanario norteamericano Time publicó una densa muestra de 36 héroes. El autor reflexiona sobre ellos con el propósito de destacar tres aspectos. a) Subraya, ante todo, los rasgos de humanidad que atraen a los hombres de hoy. b) Los contextualiza en el estilo de ser hombre que articula nuestras sociedades. c) Deja que los mismos héroes expresen ambos aspectos en sus propias biografías, tratando de no oscurecerlos con discursos situados (...)
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  21.  1
    Stamatia Dova (2012). Greek Heroes in and Out of Hades. Lexington Books.
    Greek Heroes in and out of Hades is a study on heroism and mortality from Homer to Plato. Through systematic readings of a wide range of ancient Greek texts, Stamatia Dova offers innovative hermeneutic approaches to heroic character and a comprehensive overview of the theme of descent to the underworld in the Iliad and the Odyssey, Bacchylides 5, Plato's Symposium, and Euripides' Alcestis.
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  22. Stamatia Dova (2014). Greek Heroes in and Out of Hades. Lexington Books.
    Greek Heroes in and out of Hades is a study on heroism and mortality from Homer to Plato. Through systematic readings of a wide range of ancient Greek texts, Stamatia Dova offers innovative hermeneutic approaches to heroic character and a comprehensive overview of the theme of descent to the underworld in the Iliad and the Odyssey, Bacchylides 5, Plato's Symposium, and Euripides' Alcestis.
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  23. William Irwin & David K. Johnson (eds.) (2009). Heroes and Philosophy: Buy the Book, Save the World. Wiley.
    _The first unauthorized look at the philosophy behind _Heroes_, one of TV's most popular shows_ When ordinary individuals from around the world inexplicably develop superhuman abilities, they question who they are, struggle to cope with new responsibilities, and decide whether to use their new power for good or for evil. Every episode of Tim Kring's hit TV show _Heroes_ is a philosophical quandary. _Heroes and Philosophy_ is the first book to analyze how philosophy makes this show so compelling. It lets (...)
     
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  24. William Irwin & David K. Johnson (eds.) (2009). Heroes and Philosophy: Buy the Book, Save the World. Wiley.
    _The first unauthorized look at the philosophy behind _Heroes_, one of TV's most popular shows_ When ordinary individuals from around the world inexplicably develop superhuman abilities, they question who they are, struggle to cope with new responsibilities, and decide whether to use their new power for good or for evil. Every episode of Tim Kring's hit TV show _Heroes_ is a philosophical quandary. _Heroes and Philosophy_ is the first book to analyze how philosophy makes this show so compelling. It lets (...)
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  25. William Irwin & David K. Johnson (eds.) (2009). Heroes and Philosophy: Buy the Book, Save the World. Wiley.
    _The first unauthorized look at the philosophy behind _Heroes_, one of TV's most popular shows_ When ordinary individuals from around the world inexplicably develop superhuman abilities, they question who they are, struggle to cope with new responsibilities, and decide whether to use their new power for good or for evil. Every episode of Tim Kring's hit TV show _Heroes_ is a philosophical quandary. _Heroes and Philosophy_ is the first book to analyze how philosophy makes this show so compelling. It lets (...)
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  26. William Irwin & David K. Johnson (eds.) (2009). Heroes and Philosophy: Buy the Book, Save the World. Wiley.
    _The first unauthorized look at the philosophy behind _Heroes_, one of TV's most popular shows_ When ordinary individuals from around the world inexplicably develop superhuman abilities, they question who they are, struggle to cope with new responsibilities, and decide whether to use their new power for good or for evil. Every episode of Tim Kring's hit TV show _Heroes_ is a philosophical quandary. _Heroes and Philosophy_ is the first book to analyze how philosophy makes this show so compelling. It lets (...)
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  27. Fátima Régis, Raquel Timponi, Alessandra Maia, Daniela Almeida, José Messias Santos, Juliana Fernandes, Mariana Aguiar & Renata Silva (2010). Tecnologias de Comunicação, Entretenimento E Cognição Na Cibercultura: Uma Análise Comparativa Dos Seriados O Incrível Hulk E Heroes. Logos 16 (2):30-44.
    This article presents the first output of a comparative research between two TV series: The Incredible Hulk – 1977 (before digital technology boom) and Heroes – 2006 (during cyberculture age). The research aims to investigate if differences engendered by digital technologies in media systems requires new cognitive abilities to watch the contemporary TV series.
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  28. David R. Sorensen & Brent E. Kinser (eds.) (2013). On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic in History. Yale University Press.
    Based on a series of lectures delivered in 1840, Thomas Carlyle’s_ On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic in History_ considers the creation of heroes and the ways they exert heroic leadership. From the divine and prophetic to the poetic to the religious to the political, Carlyle investigates the mysterious qualities that elevate humans to cultural significance. By situating the text in the context of six essays by distinguished scholars that reevaluate both Carlyle’s work and his ideas, David Sorensen (...)
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  29. Cass R. Sunstein (2015). Constitutional Personae: Heroes, Soldiers, Minimalists, and Mutes. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Since America's founding, the U.S. Supreme Court had issued a vast number of decisions on a staggeringly wide variety of subjects. And hundreds of judges have occupied the bench. Yet as Cass R. Sunstein, the eminent legal scholar and bestselling co-author of Nudge, points out, almost every one of the Justices fits into a very small number of types regardless of ideology: the hero, the soldier, the minimalist, and the mute. Heroes are willing to invoke the Constitution to invalidate (...)
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  30. Cor Van Der Weele & Jozef Keulartz (2009). Heroes of Agricultural Innovation: Genomics and Metaphoric Plurality. Genomics, Society and Policy 5:59-73.
    New technology has a prominent place in the theory and practice of innovation, but the association between high tech and innovation is not inevitable. In this paper, we discuss six metaphorical heroes of agricultural innovation, starting with the dominant hero of frontier science and technology. At first sight, our six heroes can be divided in those who are pro- and those who are anti-technology. Yet in the end technology, and more specifically GM technology, does not emerge as the (...)
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  31. Ricarda Schmidt (2002). Heroes and Villains in ETA Hoffmann's 'Ritter Gluck'. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 84 (3):49-66.
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  32. Penny Brown (2002). New Heroes (and Villains) for Old? Conflicts in Nineteenth-Century French Children's Literature. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 84 (3):141-159.
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  33. Peter Skrine (2002). Heroes or Villains? British Travellers' Impressions of Germany in the Early Victorian Period. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 84 (3):125-139.
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  34.  69
    Alfred Archer (2015). Saints, Heroes and Moral Necessity. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 77:105-124.
    Many people who perform paradigmatic examples of acts of supererogation claim that they could not have done otherwise. In this paper I will argue that these self-reports from moral exemplars present a challenge to the traditional view of supererogation as involving agential sacrifice. I will argue that the claims made by moral exemplars are plausibly understood as what Bernard Williams calls a ‘practical necessity’. I will then argue that this makes it implausible to view these acts as involving agential sacrifice.
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  35. Roger Paulin (2002). Heroes and Villains: The Case of Arthur Mee's Children's Encyclopedia. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 84 (3):161-170.
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  36. David Bell (2002). Goethe's' Siebenschläfer'and the Heroes of the West-Östlicher Divan. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 84 (3):67-84.
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  37. J. O. Urmson (1958). Saints and Heroes. In A. I. Melden (ed.), Essays in Moral Philosophy. University of Washington Press
     
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  38.  10
    Melinda Hall (2016). Horrible Heroes: Liberating Alternative Visions of Disability in Horror. The Disability Studies Quarterly 36 (1).
    Understanding disability requires understanding its social construction, and social construction can be read in cultural products. In this essay, I look to one major locus for images of persons with disabilities—horror. Horror films and fiction use disability imagery to create and augment horror. I first situate my understanding of disability imagery in the horror genre using a case study read through the work of Julia Kristeva. But, I go on to argue that trademark moves in the horror genre, which typically (...)
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  39. K. J. Dover (1966). The Heroes of Aristophanes Cedric H. Whitman: Aristophanes and the Comic Hero. (Martin Classical Lectures, Xix.) Pp. Ix + 333. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1964. Cloth, 48s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 16 (02):159-161.
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  40. Julia Markovits (2012). Saints, Heroes, Sages, and Villains. Philosophical Studies 158 (2):289-311.
    This essay explores the question of how to be good. My starting point is a thesis about moral worth that I’ve defended in the past: roughly, that an action is morally worthy if and only it is performed for the reasons why it is right. While I think that account gets at one important sense of moral goodness, I argue here that it fails to capture several ways of being worthy of admiration on moral grounds. Moral goodness is more multi-faceted. (...)
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  41.  6
    David Hunter (forthcoming). Response To: ‘We Could Be Heroes: Ethical Issues with the Pre-Recruitment of Research Participants’ by D. Hunter. Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2015-103262.
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  42.  36
    M. Rowell (2004). The Olivieri Debacle: Where Were the Heroes of Bioethics? A Reply. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (1):50-50.
    In her reply to Baylis the author takes the opportunity to “clarify, and in some cases to correct, some facts”I am pleased to see Dr Baylis’s article relating to the Olivieri case at the Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto. I thank her for the many facets of that case that she has articulated. Nonetheless, as the bioethicist most closely connected with the case at the clinical level I would like to take this opportunity to clarify, and (...)
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  43.  76
    Elizabeth M. Pybus (1982). Saints and Heroes. Philosophy 57 (220):193 - 199.
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  44.  79
    Michael Minch (2004). When Soldiers Aren't Heroes. Teaching Ethics 5 (1):31-40.
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  45.  85
    Louis P. Pojman, Moral Saints and Moral Heroes.
    In 1941 Father Maximilian Kolbe, a Polish friar from Warsaw was arrested for publishing anti-Nazi pamphlets and sentenced to Auschwitz. There he was beaten, kicked by shiny leather boots, and whipped by his prison guards. After one prisoner successfully escaped, the prescribed punishment was to select ten other prisoners who were to die by starvation. As ten prisoners were pulled out of line one by one, Fr. Kolbe broke out from the ranks, pleading with he Commandant to be allowed to (...)
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  46.  4
    Joan Kirkbride, Catherine Blewett & Jennifer Martin (forthcoming). Response To: ‘We Could Be Heroes: Ethical Issues with the Pre-Recruitment of Research Participants’ by Hunter. Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2015-103260.
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  47.  15
    Törbjörn Tännsjö (1998). Is Our Admiration for Sports Heroes Fascistoid? Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 25 (1):23-34.
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  48.  27
    H. Shapiro (1990). Old and New Heroes: Narrative, Composition, and Subject in Attic Black-Figure. Classical Antiquity 9 (1):114-148.
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  49.  4
    Benjamin Freedman (1996). Where Are the Heroes of Bioethics? Journal of Clinical Ethics 7 (4):297.
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  50.  26
    Patricia M. McGoldrick (1984). Saints and Heroes: A Plea for the Supererogatory. Philosophy 59 (230):523 - 528.
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