Search results for 'Heroes' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ronald G. Finch (1972). Heroes in Germany Ancient and Modern. Belfast,Queen's University.score: 15.0
     
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  2. Michael Alan Kagan (1994). Educating Heroes: The Implications of Ernest Becker's Depth Psychology of Heroism for Philosophy of Education. Hollowbrook Pub..score: 15.0
     
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  3. Mark Learmonth (2001). NHS Trust Chief Executives as Heroes? Health Care Analysis 9 (4):417-436.score: 14.0
    This paper presents a reading of the transcripts of interviews withNHS Trust Chief Executives. Using a poststructuralist understanding ofthe interviews, it privileges a reading that (ironically) representsthese Chief Executives as heroes. Following the classic hero story line,they leave the civilized order of home and journey into a threateningwilderness where they encounter dangerous and magical things butovercome them all because of their masculine characteristics such asrationality, strength and resourcefulness. One way in which thesestories can be understood to have significance is (...)
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  4. Sidney Hook (1945). The Hero in History. London, Secker & Warburg.score: 12.0
    Probes how heroes influence the course of history.
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  5. Steven H. White (1999). What is a Hero? An Exploratory Study of Students' Conceptions of Heroes. Journal of Moral Education 28 (1):81-95.score: 12.0
    This article examines the responses given by 590 kindergarten to 12th-Grade students when they were asked about their conception of heroes. The sequence of questions asked students to define, describe, name, and justify their response about heroes. Students, regardless of age level, appear to use an operational definition of hero, but when asked to identify a hero, most students named a person with whom they have had personal experiences. Responses given over the age spans move from a specific (...)
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  6. Jamee Gresley, Heidi Wallace, Julie M. Hupp & Sara Staats (2009). Heroes Don't Cheat: An Examination of Academic Dishonesty and Students' Views on Why Professors Don't Report Cheating. Ethics and Behavior 19 (3):171-183.score: 12.0
    Some students do not cheat. Students high in measures of bravery, honesty, and empathy, our defining characteristics of heroism, report less past cheating than other students. These student heroes also reported that they would feel more guilt if they cheated and also reported less intent to cheat in the future than nonheroes. We find general consensus between students and professors as to reasons for the nonreporting of cheating, suggesting a general impression of insufficient evidence, lack of courage, and denial. (...)
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  7. Margaretha Kramer-Hajos (2012). The Land and the Heroes of Lokris in the Iliad. Journal of Hellenic Studies 132 (1):87-105.score: 12.0
    The presentation of Lokris and the Lokrians in the Iliad is problematic. The entry for Lokris in the Catalogue lists an unusually large number of towns for such a small area, but many of those towns are obscure. Despite the small size of the region of Lokris, it has given the epic not one but two major heroes of very different characters: the Lokrian commander Oilean Aias and Patroklos, Achilles' friend and warrior companion. Although Aias is praised in the (...)
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  8. Mary Tiles (1990). Of Heroes and Butterflies: Technological Dreams and Human Realities. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 4 (1):89 – 100.score: 12.0
    Abstract Since the seventeenth century the dream of rendering human life less arduous and of securing it against the whims of fate through the development and deployment of technological devices has been a factor stimulating scientific research and development. This dream rests on a supposition that we live in a universe governed by deterministic laws in which limits on our ability to predict and control are set only by the imperfection of our knowledge and skill. But recent work in chaos (...)
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  9. Eladio Chávarri (2003). La humanidad de nuestros héroes. Estudios Filosóficos 52 (151):445-476.score: 12.0
    En el mes de Abril de este mismo año 2003, el semanario norteamericano Time publicó una densa muestra de 36 héroes. El autor reflexiona sobre ellos con el propósito de destacar tres aspectos. a) Subraya, ante todo, los rasgos de humanidad que atraen a los hombres de hoy. b) Los contextualiza en el estilo de ser hombre que articula nuestras sociedades. c) Deja que los mismos héroes expresen ambos aspectos en sus propias biografías, tratando de no oscurecerlos con discursos situados (...)
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  10. Daniel J. Kruger, Maryanne Fisher & Ian Jobling (2003). Proper and Dark Heroes as DADS and CADS. Human Nature 14 (3):305-317.score: 12.0
    Empirical tests described in this article support hypotheses derived from evolutionary theory on the perceptions of literary characters. The proper and dark heroes in British Romantic literature of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries respectively represent long-term and short-term mating strategies. Recent studies indicate that for long-term relationships, women seek partners with the ability and willingness to sustain paternal investment in extended relationships. For short-term relationships, women choose partners whose features indicate high genetic quality. In hypothetical scenarios, females (...)
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  11. Adam Morton (2009). Good Citizens and Moral Heroes. In Pedro Alexis Tabensky (ed.), The Positive Function of Evil. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 12.0
    Scale matters in morality, so that different factors occupy us at high and low scales. Different people are needed to be good neighbours in everyday life and moral heroes in crises. There is no reason to believe that the same traits are required for both. So there is no such thing as the all-round good person.
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  12. Robert Powell (2009). Embracing Power Roles Naturally: Rand's Nietzschean Heroes and Villains. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 10 (2):371 - 398.score: 12.0
    Because of Ayn Rand's problematic moral labels on her characters, Gail Wynand, not Howard Roark, should be her true Nietzschean hero. Wynand meets the criteria of both the Nietzschean Superman and Rand's Objectivism. Roark's false integrity taints his greatness and improperly vulgarizes him as a Nietzschean Superman. Rand problematically wants her heroes to accept the greatness of the Übermensch, but reject his natural existence and will to power. Dominique Francon should be her true Nietzschean villain, because, unlike Ellsworth Toohey, (...)
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  13. Fátima Régis, Raquel Timponi, Alessandra Maia, Daniela Almeida, José Messias Santos, Juliana Fernandes, Mariana Aguiar & Renata Silva (2010). Tecnologias de Comunicação, Entretenimento E Cognição Na Cibercultura: Uma Análise Comparativa Dos Seriados O Incrível Hulk E Heroes. Logos 16 (2):30-44.score: 12.0
    This article presents the first output of a comparative research between two TV series: The Incredible Hulk – 1977 (before digital technology boom) and Heroes – 2006 (during cyberculture age). The research aims to investigate if differences engendered by digital technologies in media systems requires new cognitive abilities to watch the contemporary TV series.
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  14. Hugh S. Chandler, Martha Nussbaum and Alcibiades.score: 9.0
    Nussbaum seems to have had a spell during which she made villains heroes (and sometimes visa versa). Thus she has argued, in effect, that Steerforth is the hero of David Copperfield, and Heathcliff the most admirable character in Wuthering Heights. Here I discuss her more or less explicit claim that Alcibiades is the hero, (and Socrates the villain) in Plato’s Symposium. -/- .
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  15. Elizabeth M. Pybus (1982). Saints and Heroes. Philosophy 57 (220):193 - 199.score: 9.0
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  16. Julia Markovits (2012). Saints, Heroes, Sages, and Villains. Philosophical Studies 158 (2):289-311.score: 9.0
    This essay explores the question of how to be good. My starting point is a thesis about moral worth that I’ve defended in the past: roughly, that an action is morally worthy if and only it is performed for the reasons why it is right. While I think that account gets at one important sense of moral goodness, I argue here that it fails to capture several ways of being worthy of admiration on moral grounds. Moral goodness is more multi-faceted. (...)
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  17. Louis P. Pojman, Moral Saints and Moral Heroes.score: 9.0
    In 1941 Father Maximilian Kolbe, a Polish friar from Warsaw was arrested for publishing anti-Nazi pamphlets and sentenced to Auschwitz. There he was beaten, kicked by shiny leather boots, and whipped by his prison guards. After one prisoner successfully escaped, the prescribed punishment was to select ten other prisoners who were to die by starvation. As ten prisoners were pulled out of line one by one, Fr. Kolbe broke out from the ranks, pleading with he Commandant to be allowed to (...)
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  18. Yogendra Chopra (1963). Professor Urmson on 'Saints and Heroes'. Philosophy 38 (144):160 - 166.score: 9.0
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  19. Christopher New (1974). Saints, Heroes and Utilitarians. Philosophy 49 (188):179 - 189.score: 9.0
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  20. Anat Biletzki & Anat Matar (eds.) (1998). The Story of Analytic Philosophy: Plot and Heroes. Routledge.score: 9.0
    This unique collection looks at analytic philosophy in its historical context. Called into question are its self-image, its relationship with philosophical alternatives, its fruitfulness and even legitimacy in the general philosophical community. This volume is an undertaking by analytic philosophers to address the crisis formed by changing cultural and philosophical trends and movements. Interpreting the crisis by telling the "story" of analytic philosophy, the volume presents its raison d' etre and the motivations, methods, and results of its (...)
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  21. Patricia M. McGoldrick (1984). Saints and Heroes: A Plea for the Supererogatory. Philosophy 59 (230):523 - 528.score: 9.0
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  22. Brayton Polka (2011). Enlightenment Heroes and the Ideal of Moral Clarity. The European Legacy 16 (1):91-96.score: 9.0
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  23. Hans Van Wees (1988). Kings in Combat: Battles and Heroes in the Iliad. Classical Quarterly 38 (01):1-.score: 9.0
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  24. Lorenne M. Burchill (1965). In Defence of Saints and Heroes. Philosophy 40 (152):152 - 157.score: 9.0
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  25. Michael Minch (2004). When Soldiers Aren't Heroes. Teaching Ethics 5 (1):31-40.score: 9.0
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  26. Richard Gaskin (1990). Do Homeric Heroes Make Real Decisions? Classical Quarterly 40 (01):1-.score: 9.0
  27. Ryan Patrick Hanley (2001). Thoreau Among His Heroes. Philosophy and Literature 25 (1):59-74.score: 9.0
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  28. Lewis S. Feuer (1993). Gertrude Himmelfarb: A Historian Considers Heroes and Their Historians. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (1):5-25.score: 9.0
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  29. William J. Gavin (1987). Heroes and Deconstruction: Lermontov'sa Hero of Our Time. Studies in East European Thought 34 (4):255-266.score: 9.0
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  30. Susan Neiman, Victims and Heroes.score: 9.0
    The Tanner Lectures are a collection of educational and scientific discussions relating to human values. Conducted by leaders in their fields, the lectures are presented at prestigious educational facilities around the world.
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  31. Bette L. Talvacchia (1988). Homer, Greek Heroes and Hellenism in Giulio Romano's Hall of Troy. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 51:235-242.score: 9.0
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  32. J. Griffin (1991). Speech in the Iliad Richard P. Martin: The Language of Heroes. Speech and Performance in the Iliad. (Myth and Poetics.) Pp. Xv + 265. Ithaca, N.Y. And London: Cornell University Press, 1989. $34.70. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 41 (01):1-5.score: 9.0
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  33. Jorge Bravo (2011). New Heroes in Antiquity (C.P.) Jones New Heroes in Antiquity. From Achilles to Antinoos. (Revealing Antiquity 18.) Pp. Xii + 123, Ills. Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press, 2010. Cased, £22.95, €27, US$29.95. ISBN: 978-0-674-03586-7. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (02):503-505.score: 9.0
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  34. H. J. Rose (1960). Who Were the Heroes? Angelo Brelich: Gli Eroi Greci. Un Problema Storico-Religioso. Pp. Xii + 410; 7 Plates. Rome: Edizioni dell'Ateneo, 1958. Paper, L. 3,800. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 10 (01):48-50.score: 9.0
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  35. Louis J. Swift (1987). Pagan and Christian Heroes in Augustine's City of God. Augustinianum 27 (3):509-522.score: 9.0
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  36. Richard Buxton (2011). (C. P.) Jones New Heroes in Antiquity: From Achilles to Antinoos. Cambridge MA and London: Harvard University Press, 2010. Pp. 123. £22.95. 9780674035867. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 131:231-232.score: 9.0
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  37. Martin Dinter (2005). Epic and Epigram—Minor Heroes in Virgil's Aeneid. Classical Quarterly 55 (01):153-169.score: 9.0
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  38. K. J. Dover (1966). The Heroes of Aristophanes Cedric H. Whitman: Aristophanes and the Comic Hero. (Martin Classical Lectures, Xix.) Pp. Ix + 333. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1964. Cloth, 48s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 16 (02):159-161.score: 9.0
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  39. Emma J. Stafford (2002). V. Karageorghis: Greek Gods and Heroes in Ancient Cyprus . Pp. 334, Map, 237 Ills. Athens: Commercial Bank of Greece, 1998. Cased. ISBN: 960-7059-08-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (01):182-.score: 9.0
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  40. Pnina G. Abir-Am (1982). Review: How Scientists View Their Heroes: Some Remarks on the Mechanism of Myth Construction. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 15 (2):281 - 315.score: 9.0
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  41. Noël Carroll (2013). Rough Heroes: A Response to A.W. Eaton. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (4):371-376.score: 9.0
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  42. Carl Elliott (1992). Constraints and Heroes. Bioethics 6 (1):1–11.score: 9.0
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  43. Jennifer Larson (2000). F. W. Alonso: La fortaleza asediada. Diosas, héroes y mujeres poderosas en el mito griego . Pp. 357. Salamanca: Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca, 1997. Paper. ISBN: 84-7481-883-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):317-.score: 9.0
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  44. Avi Mintz (2008). Understanding Evil and Educating Heroes. Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (1):185-196.score: 9.0
    Why do people do horrific things to one another? This article reviews two recent books that attempt to answer that question, Philip Zimbardo's The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil and Barbara Coloroso's Extraordinary Evil: A Brief History of Genocide . The author discusses the educational implications of these works and raises preliminary considerations for an education for heroism.
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  45. H. J. Rose (1934). W. H. D. Rouse: Gods, Heroes and Men of Ancient Greece. Pp. Xiv+244; 8 Full-Page Illustrations and Folding Table of Genealogies. London: Murray, 1934. Cloth, 7s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 48 (04):146-.score: 9.0
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  46. Tamar Rudavsky (2001). Galileo and Spinoza: Heroes, Heretics, and Hermeneutics. Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (4):611-631.score: 9.0
  47. Christos Tsagalis (2009). Iliadic Heroes (C.) Aceti, (D.) Leuzzi, (L.) Pagani (edd.) Eroi nell'Iliade. Personaggi e strutture narrative. With preface by F. Montanari. (Pleiadi 8.) Pp. xiv + 496. Rome: Edizioni di Storia e Letteratura, 2008. Paper, €64. ISBN: 978-88-8498-498-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (02):333-.score: 9.0
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  48. Paul Cartledge (1977). Hoplites and Heroes: Sparta's Contribution to the Technique of Ancient Warfare. Journal of Hellenic Studies 97:11.score: 9.0
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  49. J. M. Cook (1976). Ann Birchall and P. E. Corbett: Greek Gods and Heroes. Pp. 32; 74 Ill. On Plates. London: British Museum Publications, 1974. Cloth, £2 (Paper, £1). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 26 (02):293-.score: 9.0
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  50. Gustavo Costa (1995). Heroes Gentium. New Vico Studies 13:130-133.score: 9.0
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