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Hillel D. Braude [6]Hillel Braude [5]
  1. Hillel D. Braude (2013). Affecting the Body and Transforming Desire: The Treatment of Suffering as the End of Medicine. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (4):265-278.
    I will apply dietetic measures for the benefit of the sick according to my ability and judgment. I will keep them from harm and injustice. The Hippocratic Oath formulates the ethical principle of medical beneficence and its negative formulation non-maleficence. It relates medical ethics to the traditional end of medicine, that is, to heal, or to make whole. First and foremost, the duty of the physician is to heal, and if this is not possible at least not to harm. This (...)
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  2. Hillel D. Braude (2013). Unraveling the Knot of Suffering: Combining Neurobiological and Hermeneutic Approaches. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (4):291-294.
    The title of my paper, “Affecting the Body and Transforming Desire,” (Braude 2012a) is inspired from Plato’s Symposium, where the physician Eryximachus presents a purely neurophysiological discourse on love. James Giordano’s and Gerrit Glas’s commentaries on my paper have the timbre of a contemporary symposium, in this instance to discern the nature of suffering. Thus, I take Giordano’s and Glas’s commentaries to be generally sympathetic to my offering, although providing further critical insights that deepen the multidimensional understanding of suffering and (...)
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  3. Hillel Braude (2012). Normativity Unbound: Liminality in Palliative Care Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (2):107-122.
    This article applies the anthropological concept of liminality to reconceptualize palliative care ethics. Liminality possesses both spatial and temporal dimensions. Both these aspects are analyzed to provide insight into the intersubjective relationship between patient and caregiver in the context of palliative care. Aristotelian practical wisdom, or phronesis, is considered to be the appropriate model for palliative care ethics, provided it is able to account for liminality. Moreover, this article argues for the importance of liminality for providing an ethical structure that (...)
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  4. Hillel D. Braude (2012). Conciliating Cognition and Consciousness: The Perceptual Foundations of Clinical Reasoning. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):945-950.
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  5. Hillel D. Braude (2012). Intuition in Medicine: A Philosophical Defense of Clinical Reasoning. The University of Chicago Press.
    Intuition in medical and moral reasoning -- Moral intuitionism -- The place of Aristotelian phronesis in clinical reasoning -- Aristotle's practical syllogism: accounting for the individual through a theory of action and cognition -- Individual and statistical physiognomy: the art and science of making the invisible visible -- Clinical intuition versus statistical reasoning -- Contingency and correlation: the significance of modeling clinical reasoning on statistics -- Abduction: the intuitive support of clinical induction -- Conclusion: medical ethics beyond ontology.
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  6. Hillel Braude & Jonathan Kimmelman (2012). The Ethics of Managing Affective and Emotional States to Improve Informed Consent: Autonomy, Comprehension, and Voluntariness. Bioethics 26 (3):149-156.
    Over the past several decades the ‘affective revolution’ in cognitive psychology has emphasized the critical role affect and emotion play in human decision-making. Drawing on this affective literature, various commentators have recently proposed strategies for managing therapeutic expectation that use contextual, symbolic, or emotive interventions in the consent process to convey information or enhance comprehension. In this paper, we examine whether affective consent interventions that target affect and emotion can be reconciled with widely accepted standards for autonomous action. More specifically, (...)
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  7. Hillel D. Braude (2011). Tacit Clues and the Science of Clinical Judgement [a Commentary on Henry Et Al.]. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):940-943.
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  8. Hillel Braude (2009). The Target of the Self and the Arrows of Volition and Self-Representation. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):46 – 47.
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  9. Hillel D. Braude (2009). Clinical Intuition Versus Statistics: Different Modes of Tacit Knowledge in Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (3):181-198.
    Despite its phenomenal success since its inception in the early nineteen-nineties, the evidence-based medicine movement has not succeeded in shaking off an epistemological critique derived from the experiential or tacit dimensions of clinical reasoning about particular individuals. This critique claims that the evidence-based medicine model does not take account of tacit knowing as developed by the philosopher Michael Polanyi. However, the epistemology of evidence-based medicine is premised on the elimination of the tacit dimension from clinical judgment. This is demonstrated through (...)
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  10. Amir Raz, Cory Harris, Veronica de Jong & Hillel Braude (2009). Is There a Place for (Deceptive) Placebos Within Clinical Practice? American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):52-54.
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  11. Hillel Braude (2002). Cosmic Evolution: The Rise of Complexity in Nature (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 45 (2):307-309.
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