Search results for 'Hinduism' (try it on Scholar)

572 found
Sort by:
See also:
  1. Andrew J. Nicholson (2010). Unifying Hinduism: Philosophy and Identity in Indian Intellectual History. Columbia University Press.score: 24.0
    Some postcolonial theorists argue that the idea of a single system of belief known as "Hinduism" is a creation of nineteenth-century British imperialists. Andrew J. Nicholson introduces another perspective: although a unified Hindu identity is not as ancient as some Hindus claim, it has its roots in innovations within South Asian philosophy from the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. During this time, thinkers treated the philosophies of Vedanta, Samkhya, and Yoga, along with the worshippers of Visnu, Siva, and Sakti, as (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Arti Dhand (2002). The Dharma of Ethics, the Ethics of Dharma: Quizzing the Ideals of Hinduism. Journal of Religious Ethics 30 (3):347 - 372.score: 24.0
    This paper is divided into six parts. The first presents a rudimentary definition of ethics based on Western philosophical theories, particularly their concern for articulating universal moral principles. The second examines the assumptions anchoring Western moral philosophies, and raises the question: are the philosophical presuppositions of modern Western philosophy consistent with the presuppositions of Hinduism? It concludes that the two are not entirely in agreement, particularly on the issue of personal and social identity. The third section locates areas in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. M. M. Agrawal (2002). Freedom of the Soul: A Post-Modern Understanding of Hinduism. Concept Pub. Co..score: 24.0
    This Book Brings A Clear And Insightful Presentation Of The Wisdom Of Hinduism In All Its Fundamental Principles.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Sandu Frunza (2010). Ron Geaves, Religious Studies, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Chrisrianity, Islam. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (16):174-176.score: 24.0
    Ron Geaves, Religious Studies, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Chrisrianity, Islam The Continuum International Publishing Group, New York, 2006.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. S. N. Balagangadhara & Sarah Claerhout (2010). Are Dialogues Antidotes to Violence? Two Recent Examples From Hinduism Studies. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (19):118-143.score: 24.0
    One of the convictions in religious studies and elsewhere is about the role dialogues play: by fulfilling the need for understanding, dialogues reduce violence. In this paper, we analyze two examples from Hinduism studies to show that precisely the opposite is true: dialogue about Hinduism has become the harbinger of violence. This is not because ‘outsiders’ have studied Hinduism or because the Hindu participants are religious ‘fundamentalists’ but because of the logical requirements of such a dialogue. Generalizing (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. A. R. Singh (2009). Straight Talk: The Challenge Before Modern Day Hinduism. Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):189.score: 24.0
    _Hinduism, as an institution, offers very little to the poor and underprivileged within its fold. This is one of the prime reasons for voluntary conversion of Hindus from among its members. B.R. Ambedkar and A.R. Rahman provide poignant examples of how lack of education and health facilities for the underprivileged within its fold, respectively, led to their conversion. This can be countered by a movement to provide large-scale quality health [hospitals/PHCs] and educational [schools/colleges] facilities run by Hindu mission organisations spread (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Cyril Bernard (1977). Hinduism: Religion and Philosophy. Pontifical Institute of Theology and Philosophy.score: 24.0
    v. 1. Vedic religion, philosophic schools, from Vedism to Hinduism.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Mark W. Muesse (2003). Great World Religions, Hinduism. Teaching Co..score: 24.0
    Lecture 1. Hinduism in the world and the world of Hinduism -- Lecture 2. The early cultures of India -- Lecture 3. The world of the Veda -- Lecture 4. From the Vedic tradition to classical Hinduism -- Lecture 5. Caste -- Lecture 6. Men, women, and the stages of life -- Lecture 7. The way of action -- Lecture 8. The way of wisdom -- Lecture 9. Seeing God -- Lecture 10. The way of devotion -- (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Julius J. Lipner (2006). The Rise of "Hinduism"; or, How to Invent a World Religion with Only Moderate Success. International Journal of Hindu Studies 10 (1):91-104.score: 21.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Christopher G. Framarin (2014). HInduism and Environmental Ethics: Law, Literature, and Philosophy. Routledge.score: 21.0
    ... the Earth, San Francisco, CA: Sierra Club Books. Hill Jr., T. (2006)aFinding Value inNature«, Environmental Values 15(3): 331¥41. ¦¦(1983) aIdeals of Human Excellence and Preserving Natural Environments«, Environmental Ethics 5(3): ...
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Margaret Stutley (1984). Harper's Dictionary of Hinduism: Its Mythology, Folklore, Philosophy, Literature, and History. Harper & Row.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Satischandra[from old catalog] Chatterjee (1950). The Fundamentals of Hinduism. Calcutta, Das Gupta.score: 21.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Usha Choudhuri (2012). Hinduism: A Way of Life and a Mode of Thought. Niyogi Books.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. David Frawley (2010). Universal Hinduism: Towards a New Vision of Sanatana Dharma. Voice of India.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Śrīrāma Goyala (2009). Fundamentals of Paurāṇika Hinduism. Kusumanjali Book World.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. M. S. Manhas (2010). Understanding Hinduism Through Brahmasutra. B.R. Pub. Corp..score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Swami Paramananda (2005). Hinduism: Philosophy or Mysticism?: An Enlightening Exposé on the Real Nature of Spirituality Bequeathed by Ancient Indian Mystics. S. Paramanda.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Frank R. Podgorski (1983/1985). Hinduism: A Beautiful Mosaic. Wyndham Hall Press.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Joseph Politella (1966). Hinduism: Its Scriptures, Philosophy, and Mysticism. Iowa City, Sernoll.score: 21.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. A. Ramamurty (2000). The Philosophical Foundations of Hinduism. D.K. Printworld.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Balbir Singh (1991). Hinduism and Western Thought. Arnold Publishers.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Jadunath Sinha (1955). The Foundation of Hinduism. Calcutta, Sinha Pub. House.score: 21.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. M. L. Sondhi & Madhuri Sondhi (eds.) (2002). Hinduism's Human Face. Manak Publications.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. M. L. Sondhi & Madhuri Sondhi (eds.) (1990). Hinduism with a Human Face. Raaj Prakashan.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Yajan Veer (2008). Hinduism and Buddhism in Perspective. Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Vadakethala F. Vineeth (1997). Self and Salvation in Hinduism and Christianity: An Inter-Religious Approach. Intercultural Publications.score: 21.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Śaileśa Zaidī (ed.) (1994). Hinduism in Aligarh Manuscripts: Descriptive Catalogue of Persian Mss. Of Maulana Azad Library, A.M.U., Aligarh: On Hindu Legends, Philosophy & Faith. [REVIEW] Khuda Bakhsh Oriental Public Library.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Varadaraja V. Raman (2012). Hinduism and Science: Some Reflections. Zygon 47 (3):549-574.score: 18.0
    Abstract In recent decades scholars in every major religious tradition have been commenting on the relationship between their own tradition and science. The subject in the context of Hinduism is complex because there is no central institutionalized authority to dictate what is acceptable Hindu belief and what is not. This has resulted in a variety of perspectives that are touched upon here. Historical factors in the introduction of modern science in the Hindu world have also influenced the subject. The (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. C. Mackenzie Brown (2012). Conciliation, Conflict, or Complementarity: Responses to Three Voices in the Hinduism and Science Discourse. Zygon 47 (3):608-623.score: 18.0
    Abstract This essay is a response to three review articles on two recently published books dealing with aspects of Hinduism and science: Jonathan Edelmann's Hindu Theology and Biology: The Bhāgavata Purāṇa and Contemporary Theory, and my own, Hindu Perspectives on Evolution: Darwin, Dharma and Design. The task set by the editor of Zygon for the three reviewers was broad: they could make specific critiques of the two books, or they could use them as starting points to engage in a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jeff Spinner-Halev (2005). Hinduism, Christianity, and Liberal Religious Toleration. Political Theory 33 (1):28 - 57.score: 18.0
    The Protestant conception of religion as a private matter of conscience organized into voluntary associations informed early liberalism's conception of religion and of religious toleration, assumptions that are still present in contemporary liberalism. In many other religions, however, including Hinduism (the main though not only focus of this article), practice has a much larger role than conscience. Hinduism is not a voluntary association, and the structure of its practices, some of which are inegalitarian, makes exit very difficult. This (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Arvind Sharma (2005). Jvanmukti in Neo-Hinduism: The Case of Ramaa Mahari. Asian Philosophy 15 (3):207 – 220.score: 18.0
    Jvanmukti or 'living liberation' has been identified as a distinguishing feature of Indian thought; or, upon drawing a narrower circle, of Hindu thought; and upon drawing an even narrower cocentric circle of Vedānta - of Advaita Vedānta. In some recent studies the cogency of its formulation within Advaita Vedānta has been questioned - but without reference to the testimony of its major modern exemplar, Rama a Mahar i (1879-1950). This paper examines the significance of the life and statements of Rama (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Christopher G. Framarin (2012). Hinduism and Environmental Ethics: An Analysis and Defense of a Basic Assumption. Asian Philosophy 22 (1):75-91.score: 18.0
    The literature on Hinduism and the environment is vast, and growing quickly. It has benefitted greatly from the work of scholars in a wide range of disciplines, such as religious studies, Asian studies, history, anthropology, political science, and so on. At the same time, much of this work fails to define key terms and make fundamental assumptions explicit. Consequently, it is at least initially difficult to engage with it philosophically. In the first section of this paper, I clarify a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Arvind Sharma (1999). Jivanmukti in Neo-Hinduism: The Case of Ramana Maharsi. Asian Philosophy 9 (2):93 – 105.score: 18.0
    Jivanmukti or 'living liberation' has been identified as a distinguishing feature of Indian thought; or, upon drawing a narrower circle, of Hindu thought; and upon drawing an even narrower cocentric circle of Ved nta—of Advaita Ved nta. In some recent studies the cogency of its formulation within Advaita Ved nta has been questioned—but without reference to the testimony of its major modem exemplar, Ramana Maharsi (1879-1950). This paper examines the significance of the life and statements of Ramana Maharsi for the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Laxmikanta Padhi (2008). Environmental Holism in Hinduism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 23:115-121.score: 18.0
    Holism in environmental ethics is concerned with a harmonious relationship between man and nature. Hinduism seeks to identify and evaluate the distinctive ecological attitudes, values and practices of human beings by making clear their relations with the intellectual and ethical thought within scripture, ritual, myth,symbols, cosmology, and sacrament. In Hinduism the relation between man and nature is like the relationship between the microcosm (Pindānda) and the macrocosm (Brahmānda). The Panċamahābhuta in the Hindu tradition emphasizes that God is assigned (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. David Y. F. Ho (1995). Selfhood and Identity in Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and Hinduism: Contrasts with the West. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 25 (2):115–139.score: 15.0
  36. Eric R. Dorman (2011). Hinduism and Science: The State of the South Asian Science and Religion Discourse. Zygon 46 (3):593-619.score: 15.0
    Abstract. The science and religion discourse in the Western academy, though expansive, has not paid significant enough attention to South Asian views, particularly those from Hindu thought. This essay seeks to address this issue in three parts. First, I present the South Asian standpoint as it currently relates to the science and religion discourse. Second, I survey and evaluate some available literature on South Asian approaches to the science and religion discourse. Finally, I promote three possible steps forward: (1) the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Arvind Sharma (1996). On the Distinction Between Karma and Rebirth in Hinduism. Asian Philosophy 6 (1):29 – 35.score: 15.0
    Abstract The doctrines of Kanna and rebirth dovetail so neatly that they are often treated as a single philosophical package. This paper demonstrates that when they are each treated separately in their own right and their possible relationships are re?examined, it leads to a much more nuanced understanding of not only these concepts but also the issues they were developed to address.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. David Gordon White (2006). Digging Wells While Houses Burn? Writing Histories of Hinduism in a Time of Identity Politics. History and Theory 45 (4):104–131.score: 15.0
  39. Paul Hacker (2006). Dharma in Hinduism. Journal of Indian Philosophy 34 (5):479-496.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. David Smith (2004). Nietzsche's Hinduism, Nietzsche's India: Another Look. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 28 (1):37-56.score: 15.0
  41. Brian K. Smith (1998). Questioning Authority: Constructions and Deconstructions of Hinduism. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 2 (3):313-339.score: 15.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. A. N. Marlow (1954). Hinduism and Buddhism in Greek Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 4 (1):35-45.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jehangir N. Chubb (1972). Sri Aurobindo as the Fulfillment of Hinduism. International Philosophical Quarterly 12 (2):234-242.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Arvind Sharma (1996). The Issue of Memory as a Pramana and its Implication for the Confirmation of Reincarnation in Hinduism. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 24 (1):21-36.score: 15.0
  45. David James Smith (2004). Nietzsche's Hinduism, Nietzsche's India: Another Look. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 28 (1):37-56.score: 15.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Peter Munz (1956). Relationship and Solitude in Hinduism and Christianity. Philosophy East and West 6 (2):137-152.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Willem B. Drees (2011). History, Hinduism, and Christian Humanism. Zygon 46 (3):515-516.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Knut A. Jacobsen (2003). Hinduism and Ecology: The Intersection of Earth, Sky, and Water. Environmental Ethics 25 (3):333-336.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Isaac Padinjarekuttu (2011). Religion in India: A Historical Introduction. By Fred W. Clothey and The Life of Hinduism. Edited by John Stratto Hawley and Vasudha Narayanan. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 52 (5):887-887.score: 15.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Arvind Sharma (1999). The Puruṣārthas: An Axiological Exploration of Hinduism. Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (2):223 - 256.score: 15.0
    Three doctrines have often been identified in the context of Hindu civilization as its distinctive markers: the doctrine of the varṇas (or the doctrine of the four classes), the doctrine of āśramas (or the doctrine of the four stages of life), and the doctrine of the puruṣārthas (or the doctrine of the four goals of life). The study of the last of these has been comparatively neglected and the doctrine has even been dubbed a myth (Krishna 1996, 189-205). The purpose (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 572