Search results for 'Hinduism Christianity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jeff Spinner-Halev (2005). Hinduism, Christianity, and Liberal Religious Toleration. Political Theory 33 (1):28 - 57.score: 156.0
    The Protestant conception of religion as a private matter of conscience organized into voluntary associations informed early liberalism's conception of religion and of religious toleration, assumptions that are still present in contemporary liberalism. In many other religions, however, including Hinduism (the main though not only focus of this article), practice has a much larger role than conscience. Hinduism is not a voluntary association, and the structure of its practices, some of which are inegalitarian, makes exit very difficult. This (...)
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  2. Spinner-Halev Jeff (2005). Hinduism, Christianity, and Liberal Religious Toleration. Political Theory 33 (1).score: 150.0
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  3. Vadakethala F. Vineeth (1997). Self and Salvation in Hinduism and Christianity: An Inter-Religious Approach. Intercultural Publications.score: 132.0
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  4. D. G. Luck (1997). Hans Kueng, Josef van Ess, Heinrich von Stietencron, and Heinz Bechert, Christianity and World Religions: Paths to Dialogue with Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Buddhist Christian Studies 17:231-234.score: 122.0
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  5. Peter Munz (1956). Relationship and Solitude in Hinduism and Christianity. Philosophy East and West 6 (2):137-152.score: 120.0
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  6. Reasonableness Of Christianity (2010). The Reasonableness of Christianity and its Vindications. In S. J. Savonius-Wroth Paul Schuurman & Jonathen Walmsley (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Locke. Continuum.score: 120.0
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  7. François Lépineux & Jean-Jacques Rose (2010). Spiritual Leadership in Business: Perspectives From Christianity and Hinduism. In Henri Claude de Bettignies & Mike J. Thompson (eds.), Leadership, Spirituality and the Common Good: East and West Approaches. Garant. 27--42.score: 120.0
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  8. Thomas Mampra (1976). Encounter Between Hinduism and Christianity. Journal of Dharma 1:246-266.score: 120.0
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  9. Karama Siṅgha Rājū (2002). Ethical Perceptions of World Religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, and Sikhism: A Comparative Study. Guru Nanak Dev University.score: 120.0
     
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  10. A. R. Singh (2009). Straight Talk: The Challenge Before Modern Day Hinduism. Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):189.score: 96.0
    _Hinduism, as an institution, offers very little to the poor and underprivileged within its fold. This is one of the prime reasons for voluntary conversion of Hindus from among its members. B.R. Ambedkar and A.R. Rahman provide poignant examples of how lack of education and health facilities for the underprivileged within its fold, respectively, led to their conversion. This can be countered by a movement to provide large-scale quality health [hospitals/PHCs] and educational [schools/colleges] facilities run by Hindu mission organisations spread (...)
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  11. Joshua Kalapati (2002). Dr. S. Radhakrishnan and Christianity: An Introduction to Hindu-Christian Apologetics. Ispck.score: 90.0
     
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  12. A. R. Singh & S. A. Singh (2004). Gandhi on Religion, Faith and Conversion-Secular Blueprint Relevant Today. Mens Sana Monographs 2 (1):79.score: 84.0
    Gandhi believed in judging people of other faiths from their stand point rather than his own. He welcomed contact of Hinduism with other religions, especially the Christian doctrines, for he did not want to be debarred from assimilating good anywhere else. He believed a respectful study of other's religion was a sacred duty and it did not reduce reverence for one's own. He was looking out for those universal principles which transcended religion as a dogma. He expected religion to (...)
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  13. Kala Acharya, Nicholas Manca & Lalita Namjoshi (eds.) (1999). A Dialogue: Hindu-Christian Cosmology and Religion. Somaiya Publications.score: 70.0
  14. K. P. Aleaz (2005). Christian Responses to Indian Philosophy. Punthi Pustak.score: 70.0
  15. K. P. Aleaz (1991). The Role of Pramāṇas in Hindu Christian Epistemology. Punthi-Pustak.score: 70.0
  16. Nehemiah Nilakantha Sastri Goreh (2003). A Christian Response to the Hindu Philosophical Systems. Punthi Pustak.score: 70.0
     
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  17. K. P. Aleaz & V. J. John (eds.) (2010). Many Ways of Pluralism: Essays in Honour of Kalarikkal Poulose Aleaz. Ispck & Bishop's College, Kolkata.score: 60.0
     
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  18. Thomas Kadankavil & Augustine Thottakara (eds.) (2002). Western Encounter with Indian Philosophy: Festschrift in Honour of Prof. Dr. Thomas Kadankavil. Dharmaram Publications.score: 60.0
  19. Eva Olsson (1959). The Philosophy of Sri Aurobindo in the Light of the Gospel. Christian Literature Society.score: 60.0
     
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  20. Geevarghese Mar Osthathios (2007). Atr̲aitadaivaśāstr̲avuṃ Snēhattint̲e Ēkamatavuṃ. Ḍi. Si. Buks.score: 60.0
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  21. Chad V. Meister (2012). Evil: A Guide for the Perplexed. Continuum.score: 54.0
    What is evil? -- Problems of evil -- Theodicy -- Divine hiddenness -- Evil, atheism and the problem of good -- Evil and suffering in Hinduism and Buddhism -- Eternal goods and the triumph over evil.
     
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  22. Willem B. Drees (2011). History, Hinduism, and Christian Humanism. Zygon 46 (3):515-516.score: 50.0
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  23. Justin McBrayer & Daniel Howard-Snyder (eds.) (2013). The Blackwell Companion to the Problem of Evil. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 48.0
    This book is a collection of 33 new articles on the problem of evil.
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  24. James Turner Johnson (2008). Thinking Comparatively About Religion and War. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (1):157-179.score: 48.0
    In contrast to the period when the "Journal of Religious Ethics" began publishing, the study of religion in relation to war and connected issues has prospered in recent years. This article examines three collections of essays providing comparative perspectives on these topics, two recently authored studies of Buddhism and Islam in relation to war, and a compendious collection of texts on Western moral tradition concerning war, peace, and related issues from classical Greece and Rome to the present.
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  25. Betty Heimann (1937). Indian and Western Philosophy. London, G. Allen & Unwin, Ltd..score: 48.0
     
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  26. Richard Garbe (1914). Christian Elements in Later Krishnaism and in Other Hinduistic Sects. The Monist 24 (1):35-66.score: 40.0
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  27. Judson B. Trapnell (1999). Two Models of Christian Dialogue with Hinduism. Bede Griffiths and Abhishiktananda. Dialogue and Universalism 9 (7-12):177.score: 40.0
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  28. Robert Bernasconi (2010). Francois Bernier si Brahmanii: Un obstacol în calea conversatiei inter-culturale/ Francois Bernier and the Brahmans: Exposing an Obstacle to Cross-cultural Conversation. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (19):107-117.score: 36.0
    Taking its cue from François Bernier’s Voyages and focusing on the assumptions that stand in the background of Immanuel Kant’s view of the encounter between Christianity and Hinduism, this text endeavors to bring to light the theoretical framework that shaped the dialogue between the West and the East since the 18th century. The author’s contention is that the way that Western philosophy has tended to conceive of universal values has been one of the fundamental obstacles that has hindered (...)
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  29. Karl E. Peters (2003). Pluralism and Ambivalence in the Evolution of Morality. Zygon 38 (2):333-354.score: 24.0
    Much good work has been done on the evolution of human morality by focusing on how “selfish genes‘ can give rise to altruistic human beings. A richer research program is needed, however, to take into account the ambivalence of naturally evolved biopsychological motivators and the historical pluralism of human morality in religious systems. Such a program is described here. A first step is to distinguish the ultimate cause of natural selection from proximate causes that are the results of natural selection. (...)
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  30. Ray Billington (1997). Understanding Eastern Philosophy. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Ray Billington explores the spirituality of Eastern thought and its differences from and relationships with the Western religious tradition by presenting the main principles of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Jainism and Confucianism. Billington discusses the central themes of religious philosophy, comparing Eastern and Western views of belief of God, the soul, moral decision-making, nature, faith and authority. He then challenges theism, particularly Christianity, with its belief in a personal God bestowing a certain version of "truth". He concludes that the (...)
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  31. Yiftach Fehige (2013). Sexual Diversity and Divine Creation: A Tightrope Walk Between Christianity and Science. Zygon 48 (1):35-59.score: 24.0
    Although modern societies have come to recognize diversity in human sexuality as simply part of nature, many Christian communities and thinkers still have considerable difficulties with related developments in politics, legislation, and science. In fact, homosexuality is a recurrent topic in the transdisciplinary encounter between Christianity and the sciences, an encounter that is otherwise rather “asexual.” I propose that the recent emergence of “Christianity and Science” as an academic field in its own right is an important part of (...)
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  32. Peter Forrest (2010). Spinozistic Pantheism, the Environment and Christianity. Sophia 49 (4):463-473.score: 24.0
    I am not a pantheist and I don’t believe that pantheism is consistent with Christianity. My preferred speculation is what I call the Swiss Cheese theory: we and our artefacts are the holes in God, the only Godless parts of reality. In this paper, I begin by considering a world rather like ours but without any beings capable of sin. Ignoring extraterrestrials and angels we could consider the world, say, 5 million years ago. Pantheism was, I say, true at (...)
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  33. C. J. Arthur (1986). Ineffability and Intelligibility: Towards an Understanding of the Radical Unlikeness of Religious Experience. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 20 (2/3):109 - 129.score: 24.0
    I do not for a moment question the fact that many people have experiences of a special type which may be termed “religious”, The extent to which religious experience may be regarded as a reasonably common phenomenon in present-day Britain is shown clearly by David Hay in his Exploring Inner Space, Harmondsworth 1982. that such experiences often involve reference to something which appears to display a radical unlikeness to all else and that they are therefore in some sense inexpressible. Doubtless (...)
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  34. Simone Weil (1957/1998). Intimations of Christianity Among the Ancient Greeks. Routledge.score: 24.0
    In Intimations of Christianity Among the Ancient Greeks , Simone Weil discusses precursors to Christian religious ideas which can be found in ancient Greek mythology, literature and philosophy. She looks at evidence of "Christian" feelings in Greek literature, notably in Electra, Orestes, and Antigone , and in the Iliad , going on to examine God in Plato, and divine love in creation, as seen by the ancient Greeks.
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  35. Domenic Marbaniang (2008). Anatomy of Religious Violence. Basileia 1 (1):24.score: 24.0
    Religious violence is a function of deep philosophical and psychological belief-behavior. This article explores the issue in light of Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, and Psychology of evil.
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  36. Andrew J. Nicholson (2010). Unifying Hinduism: Philosophy and Identity in Indian Intellectual History. Columbia University Press.score: 24.0
    Some postcolonial theorists argue that the idea of a single system of belief known as "Hinduism" is a creation of nineteenth-century British imperialists. Andrew J. Nicholson introduces another perspective: although a unified Hindu identity is not as ancient as some Hindus claim, it has its roots in innovations within South Asian philosophy from the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. During this time, thinkers treated the philosophies of Vedanta, Samkhya, and Yoga, along with the worshippers of Visnu, Siva, and Sakti, as (...)
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  37. William A. Galston & Peter H. Hoffenberg (eds.) (2010). Poverty and Morality: Religious and Secular Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction William A. Galston and Peter H. Hoffenberg; 2. Global poverty and uneven development Sakiko Fukuda-Parr; 3. The karma of poverty: a Buddhist perspective David R. Loy; 4. Poverty and morality in Christianity Kent A. Van Til; 5. Classical liberalism, poverty, and morality Tom G. Palmer; 6. Confucian perspectives on poverty and morality Peter Nosco; 7. Poverty and morality: a feminist perspective Nancy J. Hirschmann; 8. Hinduism and poverty Arvind Sharma; 9. The problem (...)
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  38. C. K. Raju (2003). The Eleven Pictures of Time: The Physics, Philosophy, and Politics of Time Beliefs. Sage Publications.score: 24.0
    Visit the author's Web site at www.11PicsOfTime.com Time is a mystery that has perplexed humankind since time immemorial. Resolving this mystery is of significance not only to philosophers and physicists but is also a very practical concern. Our perception of time shapes our values and way of life; it also mediates the interaction between science and religion both of which rest fundamentally on assumptions about the nature of time. C K Raju begins with a critical exposition of various time-beliefs, ranging (...)
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  39. Keith E. Yandell (1999). Philosophy of Religion: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Philosophy of Religion provides an account of the central issues and viewpoints in the philosophy of religion but also shows how such issues can be rationally assessed and in what ways competing views can be rationally assessed. It includes major philosophical figures in religious traditions as well as discussions by important contemporary philosophers. Keith E. Yandell deals lucidly and constructively with representative views from Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.
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  40. Xinzhong Yao (1996). Confucianism and Christianity: A Comparative Study of Jen and Agape. Distributed in the U.S. By International Specialized Bk. Services.score: 24.0
    The underlying idea presented in this book is that there are similarities as well as differences between Confucianism as Humanistic tradition and Christianity ...
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  41. Andrew Collier (2001). Christianity and Marxism: A Philosophical Contribution to Their Reconciliation. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Christians and Marxists have co-operated in various forms of political work in recent decades, and, after earlier years of antagonism, thinkers on both sides have come to take the other seriously. The aim of this book is to get Christianity and Marxism to meet on terrain on which they might seem most opposed: their philosophical positions; and to do so without watering either down, but taking then full strength.
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  42. Arti Dhand (2002). The Dharma of Ethics, the Ethics of Dharma: Quizzing the Ideals of Hinduism. Journal of Religious Ethics 30 (3):347 - 372.score: 24.0
    This paper is divided into six parts. The first presents a rudimentary definition of ethics based on Western philosophical theories, particularly their concern for articulating universal moral principles. The second examines the assumptions anchoring Western moral philosophies, and raises the question: are the philosophical presuppositions of modern Western philosophy consistent with the presuppositions of Hinduism? It concludes that the two are not entirely in agreement, particularly on the issue of personal and social identity. The third section locates areas in (...)
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  43. Russell Goodman, Ralph Waldo Emerson. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    An American essayist, poet, and popular philosopher, Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–82) began his career as a Unitarian minister in Boston, but achieved worldwide fame as a lecturer and the author of such essays as “Self-Reliance,” “History,” “The Over-Soul,” and “Fate.” Drawing on English and German Romanticism, Neoplatonism, Kantianism, and Hinduism, Emerson developed a metaphysics of process, an epistemology of moods, and an “existentialist” ethics of self-improvement. He influenced generations of Americans, from his friend Henry David Thoreau to John Dewey, (...)
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  44. Michel Henry (2003). I Am the Truth: Toward a Philosophy of Christianity. Stanford University Press.score: 24.0
    A part of the “return to religion” now evident in European philosophy, this book represents the culmination of the career of a leading phenomenological thinker whose earlier works trace a trajectory from Marx through a genealogy of psychoanalysis that interprets Descartes’s “I think, I am” as “I feel myself thinking, I am.” In this book, Henry does not ask whether Christianity is “true” or “false.” Rather, what is in question here is what Christianity considers as truth, what kind (...)
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  45. Matthew Eric Engelke & Matt Tomlinson (eds.) (2006). The Limits of Meaning: Case Studies in the Anthropology of Christianity. Berghahn Books.score: 24.0
    Meaning, Anthropology, Christianity Matt Tomlinson & Matthew Engelke The Uses of Meaning As Stanley Tambiah once said, "the various ways 'meaning' is ...
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  46. Charles Muller, Patterns of Religion.score: 24.0
    Patterns of Religion is an introduction to the religions of the world with an emphasis on seven of the most influential traditions: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Taoism. The book also includes chapters on ancient patterns of spirituality and tribal religions in historical times; an epilogue on millennial religions; and appendixes on Jainism, Sikhism, Shinto, and the Web sites of the religions that are the subjects of the text. Other, traditions such as Zoroastrianism and Chinese; folk (...)
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  47. Irene Oh (2010). Motherhood in Christianity and Islam: Critiques, Realities, and Possibilities. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (4):638-653.score: 24.0
    Common experiences of mothering offer profound critiques of maternal ethical norms found in both Christianity and Islam. The familiar responsibilities of caring for children, assumed by the majority of Christian and Muslim women, provide the basis for reassessing sacrificial and selfless love, protesting unjust religious and political systems, and dismantling romanticized notions of childcare. As a distinctive category of women's experience, motherhood may offer valuable perspectives necessary for remedying injustices that afflict mothers and children in particular, as well as (...)
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  48. James Franklin (2004). Is Jensenism Compatible with Christianity? Quadrant 48 (12):30-31.score: 24.0
    A RECENT BIOGRAPHY of Marcus Loane, evangelical Anglican Archbishop of Sydney in the 1960s, records that as a student at Moore Theological College he would read during lectures to avoid having to listen to the liberal Principal. When you are committed to a closed system of thought, you can't be too careful when it comes to letting ideas in from the outside. But what about the ideas already inside? How does the Sydney Anglican interpretation of Christianity compare to what (...)
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  49. Sohail H. Hashmi & Steven Lee (eds.) (2004). Ethics and Weapons of Mass Destruction: Religious and Secular Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This volume offers a unique perspective on the discussion of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) by broadening the terms of the debate to include secular as well as religious investigations not normally considered. Its contributed essays feature a structured dialogue between representatives of the following ethical traditions-- Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, feminism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, liberalism, natural law, pacifism, and realism--who address identical moral issues in order to create a dialogue both within and across traditions.
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  50. M. M. Agrawal (2002). Freedom of the Soul: A Post-Modern Understanding of Hinduism. Concept Pub. Co..score: 24.0
    This Book Brings A Clear And Insightful Presentation Of The Wisdom Of Hinduism In All Its Fundamental Principles.
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