Search results for 'Hinduism Christianity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jeff Spinner-Halev (2005). Hinduism, Christianity, and Liberal Religious Toleration. Political Theory 33 (1):28 - 57.score: 96.0
    The Protestant conception of religion as a private matter of conscience organized into voluntary associations informed early liberalism's conception of religion and of religious toleration, assumptions that are still present in contemporary liberalism. In many other religions, however, including Hinduism (the main though not only focus of this article), practice has a much larger role than conscience. Hinduism is not a voluntary association, and the structure of its practices, some of which are inegalitarian, makes exit very difficult. This (...)
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  2. Spinner-Halev Jeff (2005). Hinduism, Christianity, and Liberal Religious Toleration. Political Theory 33 (1).score: 90.0
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  3. A. R. Singh & S. A. Singh (2004). Gandhi on Religion, Faith and Conversion-Secular Blueprint Relevant Today. Mens Sana Monographs 2 (1):79.score: 84.0
    Gandhi believed in judging people of other faiths from their stand point rather than his own. He welcomed contact of Hinduism with other religions, especially the Christian doctrines, for he did not want to be debarred from assimilating good anywhere else. He believed a respectful study of other's religion was a sacred duty and it did not reduce reverence for one's own. He was looking out for those universal principles which transcended religion as a dogma. He expected religion to (...)
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  4. A. R. Singh (2009). Straight Talk: The Challenge Before Modern Day Hinduism. Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):189.score: 84.0
    _Hinduism, as an institution, offers very little to the poor and underprivileged within its fold. This is one of the prime reasons for voluntary conversion of Hindus from among its members. B.R. Ambedkar and A.R. Rahman provide poignant examples of how lack of education and health facilities for the underprivileged within its fold, respectively, led to their conversion. This can be countered by a movement to provide large-scale quality health [hospitals/PHCs] and educational [schools/colleges] facilities run by Hindu mission organisations spread (...)
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  5. Vadakethala F. Vineeth (1997). Self and Salvation in Hinduism and Christianity: An Inter-Religious Approach. Intercultural Publications.score: 84.0
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  6. Reasonableness Of Christianity (2010). The Reasonableness of Christianity and its Vindications. In S. J. Savonius-Wroth Paul Schuurman & Jonathen Walmsley (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Locke. Continuum.score: 80.0
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  7. Joshua Kalapati (2002). Dr. S. Radhakrishnan and Christianity: An Introduction to Hindu-Christian Apologetics. Ispck.score: 78.0
     
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  8. D. G. Luck (1997). Hans Kueng, Josef van Ess, Heinrich von Stietencron, and Heinz Bechert, Christianity and World Religions: Paths to Dialogue with Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Buddhist Christian Studies 17:231-234.score: 74.0
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  9. Peter Munz (1956). Relationship and Solitude in Hinduism and Christianity. Philosophy East and West 6 (2):137-152.score: 72.0
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  10. François Lépineux & Jean-Jacques Rose (2010). Spiritual Leadership in Business: Perspectives From Christianity and Hinduism. In Henri Claude de Bettignies & Mike J. Thompson (eds.), Leadership, Spirituality and the Common Good: East and West Approaches. Garant. 27--42.score: 72.0
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  11. Thomas Mampra (1976). Encounter Between Hinduism and Christianity. Journal of Dharma 1:246-266.score: 72.0
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  12. Karama Siṅgha Rājū (2002). Ethical Perceptions of World Religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, and Sikhism: A Comparative Study. Guru Nanak Dev University.score: 72.0
     
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  13. Kala Acharya, Nicholas Manca & Lalita Namjoshi (eds.) (1999). A Dialogue: Hindu-Christian Cosmology and Religion. Somaiya Publications.score: 66.0
  14. K. P. Aleaz (2005). Christian Responses to Indian Philosophy. Punthi Pustak.score: 66.0
  15. K. P. Aleaz (1991). The Role of Pramāṇas in Hindu Christian Epistemology. Punthi-Pustak.score: 66.0
  16. Nehemiah Nilakantha Sastri Goreh (2003). A Christian Response to the Hindu Philosophical Systems. Punthi Pustak.score: 66.0
     
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  17. K. P. Aleaz & V. J. John (eds.) (2010). Many Ways of Pluralism: Essays in Honour of Kalarikkal Poulose Aleaz. Ispck & Bishop's College, Kolkata.score: 60.0
     
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  18. Thomas Kadankavil & Augustine Thottakara (eds.) (2002). Western Encounter with Indian Philosophy: Festschrift in Honour of Prof. Dr. Thomas Kadankavil. Dharmaram Publications.score: 60.0
  19. Eva Olsson (1959). The Philosophy of Sri Aurobindo in the Light of the Gospel. Christian Literature Society.score: 60.0
     
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  20. Geevarghese Mar Osthathios (2007). Atr̲aitadaivaśāstr̲avuṃ Snēhattint̲e Ēkamatavuṃ. Ḍi. Si. Buks.score: 60.0
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  21. Chad V. Meister (2012). Evil: A Guide for the Perplexed. Continuum.score: 54.0
    What is evil? -- Problems of evil -- Theodicy -- Divine hiddenness -- Evil, atheism and the problem of good -- Evil and suffering in Hinduism and Buddhism -- Eternal goods and the triumph over evil.
     
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  22. Justin McBrayer & Daniel Howard-Snyder (eds.) (2013). The Blackwell Companion to the Problem of Evil. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 48.0
    This book is a collection of 33 new articles on the problem of evil.
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  23. James Turner Johnson (2008). Thinking Comparatively About Religion and War. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (1):157-179.score: 48.0
    In contrast to the period when the "Journal of Religious Ethics" began publishing, the study of religion in relation to war and connected issues has prospered in recent years. This article examines three collections of essays providing comparative perspectives on these topics, two recently authored studies of Buddhism and Islam in relation to war, and a compendious collection of texts on Western moral tradition concerning war, peace, and related issues from classical Greece and Rome to the present.
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  24. Betty Heimann (1937). Indian and Western Philosophy. London, G. Allen & Unwin, Ltd..score: 48.0
     
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  25. Robert Bernasconi (2010). Francois Bernier si Brahmanii: Un obstacol în calea conversatiei inter-culturale/ Francois Bernier and the Brahmans: Exposing an Obstacle to Cross-cultural Conversation. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (19):107-117.score: 36.0
    Taking its cue from François Bernier’s Voyages and focusing on the assumptions that stand in the background of Immanuel Kant’s view of the encounter between Christianity and Hinduism, this text endeavors to bring to light the theoretical framework that shaped the dialogue between the West and the East since the 18th century. The author’s contention is that the way that Western philosophy has tended to conceive of universal values has been one of the fundamental obstacles that has hindered (...)
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  26. Willem B. Drees (2011). History, Hinduism, and Christian Humanism. Zygon 46 (3):515-516.score: 30.0
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  27. Karl E. Peters (2003). Pluralism and Ambivalence in the Evolution of Morality. Zygon 38 (2):333-354.score: 24.0
    Much good work has been done on the evolution of human morality by focusing on how “selfish genes‘ can give rise to altruistic human beings. A richer research program is needed, however, to take into account the ambivalence of naturally evolved biopsychological motivators and the historical pluralism of human morality in religious systems. Such a program is described here. A first step is to distinguish the ultimate cause of natural selection from proximate causes that are the results of natural selection. (...)
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  28. Ray Billington (1997). Understanding Eastern Philosophy. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Ray Billington explores the spirituality of Eastern thought and its differences from and relationships with the Western religious tradition by presenting the main principles of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Jainism and Confucianism. Billington discusses the central themes of religious philosophy, comparing Eastern and Western views of belief of God, the soul, moral decision-making, nature, faith and authority. He then challenges theism, particularly Christianity, with its belief in a personal God bestowing a certain version of "truth". He concludes that the (...)
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  29. C. J. Arthur (1986). Ineffability and Intelligibility: Towards an Understanding of the Radical Unlikeness of Religious Experience. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 20 (2/3):109 - 129.score: 24.0
    I do not for a moment question the fact that many people have experiences of a special type which may be termed “religious”, The extent to which religious experience may be regarded as a reasonably common phenomenon in present-day Britain is shown clearly by David Hay in his Exploring Inner Space, Harmondsworth 1982. that such experiences often involve reference to something which appears to display a radical unlikeness to all else and that they are therefore in some sense inexpressible. Doubtless (...)
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  30. Domenic Marbaniang (2008). Anatomy of Religious Violence. Basileia 1 (1):24.score: 24.0
    Religious violence is a function of deep philosophical and psychological belief-behavior. This article explores the issue in light of Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, and Psychology of evil.
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  31. William A. Galston & Peter H. Hoffenberg (eds.) (2010). Poverty and Morality: Religious and Secular Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction William A. Galston and Peter H. Hoffenberg; 2. Global poverty and uneven development Sakiko Fukuda-Parr; 3. The karma of poverty: a Buddhist perspective David R. Loy; 4. Poverty and morality in Christianity Kent A. Van Til; 5. Classical liberalism, poverty, and morality Tom G. Palmer; 6. Confucian perspectives on poverty and morality Peter Nosco; 7. Poverty and morality: a feminist perspective Nancy J. Hirschmann; 8. Hinduism and poverty Arvind Sharma; 9. The problem (...)
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  32. C. K. Raju (2003). The Eleven Pictures of Time: The Physics, Philosophy, and Politics of Time Beliefs. Sage Publications.score: 24.0
    Visit the author's Web site at www.11PicsOfTime.com Time is a mystery that has perplexed humankind since time immemorial. Resolving this mystery is of significance not only to philosophers and physicists but is also a very practical concern. Our perception of time shapes our values and way of life; it also mediates the interaction between science and religion both of which rest fundamentally on assumptions about the nature of time. C K Raju begins with a critical exposition of various time-beliefs, ranging (...)
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  33. Keith E. Yandell (1999). Philosophy of Religion: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Philosophy of Religion provides an account of the central issues and viewpoints in the philosophy of religion but also shows how such issues can be rationally assessed and in what ways competing views can be rationally assessed. It includes major philosophical figures in religious traditions as well as discussions by important contemporary philosophers. Keith E. Yandell deals lucidly and constructively with representative views from Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.
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  34. Russell Goodman, Ralph Waldo Emerson. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    An American essayist, poet, and popular philosopher, Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–82) began his career as a Unitarian minister in Boston, but achieved worldwide fame as a lecturer and the author of such essays as “Self-Reliance,” “History,” “The Over-Soul,” and “Fate.” Drawing on English and German Romanticism, Neoplatonism, Kantianism, and Hinduism, Emerson developed a metaphysics of process, an epistemology of moods, and an “existentialist” ethics of self-improvement. He influenced generations of Americans, from his friend Henry David Thoreau to John Dewey, (...)
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  35. Charles Muller, Patterns of Religion.score: 24.0
    Patterns of Religion is an introduction to the religions of the world with an emphasis on seven of the most influential traditions: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Taoism. The book also includes chapters on ancient patterns of spirituality and tribal religions in historical times; an epilogue on millennial religions; and appendixes on Jainism, Sikhism, Shinto, and the Web sites of the religions that are the subjects of the text. Other, traditions such as Zoroastrianism and Chinese; folk (...)
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  36. Sohail H. Hashmi & Steven Lee (eds.) (2004). Ethics and Weapons of Mass Destruction: Religious and Secular Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This volume offers a unique perspective on the discussion of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) by broadening the terms of the debate to include secular as well as religious investigations not normally considered. Its contributed essays feature a structured dialogue between representatives of the following ethical traditions-- Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, feminism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, liberalism, natural law, pacifism, and realism--who address identical moral issues in order to create a dialogue both within and across traditions.
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  37. Walter D. Mignolo (2005). Prophets Facing Sidewise: The Geopolitics of Knowledge and the Colonial Difference. Social Epistemology 19 (1):111 – 127.score: 24.0
    There is no safe place and no single locus of enunciation from where the uni-versal could be articulated for all and forever. Hindu nationalism and Western neo-liberalism are entangled in a long history of the logic of coloniality (domination, oppression, exploitation) hidden under the rhetoric of modernity (salvation, civilization, progress, development, freedom and democracy). There are, however, needs and possibilities for Indians and Western progressive intellectuals working together to undermine and supersede the assumptions that liberal thinkers in the West are (...)
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  38. Arvind Sharma (2006). A Primal Perspective on the Philosophy of Religion. Springer.score: 24.0
    The philosophy of religion has been a largely European intellectual enterprise in two ways. It arose in Europe as a discipline and its subject matter has been profoundly influenced by Christianity as practised in Europe. The process of its deprovincialization in this respect started when it began to take religions other than Christianity within its purview - such as Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam. Although now the religions of both East and West have found a place in (...)
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  39. Peter Koslowski (ed.) (2003). Philosophy Bridging the World Religions. Kluwer Academic.score: 24.0
    Religions are the largest communities of the global society and claim, at least in the cases of Islam and Christianity, to be universal interpretations of life and orders of existence. With the globalization of the world economy and the unity of the global society in the Internet, they gain unprecedented access to the entire human race through modern means of communication. At the same time, this globalization brings religions into conflict with one another in their claims to universal validity. (...)
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  40. Nicholas F. Gier (1995). Xunzi and the Confucian Answer to Titanism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (2):129-151.score: 24.0
    The term "humanism" has been used to describe only one eastern philosophy: Confucianism. Commentators on Indian philosophy are sometimes emphatic in their judgment that Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism represent the very antithesis of western or Confucian humanism. Heinrich Zimmer is typical: "Humanity ... was the paramount concern of Greek idealism, as it is today of western Christianity in its modern form: but for the Indian sages and ascetics... humanity was no more than the shell to be pierced, shattered, (...)
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  41. S. Brent Plate & David Jasper (eds.) (1999). Imag(in)Ing Otherness: Filmic Visions of Living Together. OUP USA.score: 24.0
    Imag(in)ing Otherness explores relationships between film and religion, aesthetics and ethics. The volume examines these relationships by viewing how otherness is imaged in film and how otherness alternately might be imagined. Drawing from a variety of films from differing religious perspectives--including Chan Buddhism, Hinduism, Native American religions, Christianity, and Judaism--the essays gathered in this volume examine the particular problems of "living together" when faced with the tensions brought out through the otherness of differing sexualities, ethnicities, genders, religions, cultures, (...)
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  42. Sung-Soo Kim (2008). Ham Sok-Hon (1901-1989). Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:359-368.score: 24.0
    This paper explores Ham's role as a maverick thinker, a pacifist and an innovator of religious pluralism in twentieth century Korea. Ham saw an individual's spiritual quest and the struggle for social justice as interrelated. As an idealist, Ham viewed human beings basically as moral beings, and perceived the Supreme Being or God not only as a transcendental being, but also as an imminent being both in the sense of existing everywhere and also in the sense of existing as `inner (...)
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  43. Joakim Sandberg (2013). Usury. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 24.0
    Usury originally and simply meant the practice of charging interest on loans. This practice was forcefully condemned and generally banned in both Ancient and Medieval times. Indeed, prohibitions against interest can be found in the traditions of all the major religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Islam, and Christianity – compare, for instance, the commandments of the Hindu lawmaker Vasishtha, and the biblical story of how Jesus cast the moneylenders out of the temple (Matthew 21:12). As interest started to become (...)
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  44. Judson B. Trapnell (1993). Bede Griffiths, Mystical Knowing, and the Unity of Religions. Philosophy and Theology 7 (4):355-379.score: 24.0
    Strict constructivist philosophers conclude that no truth claims can be verified on the basis of mystical exploration due to the thoroughly conditioned character of such experiences. In response, Bede Griffiths’s life of dialogue between Christianity and Hinduism suggests that mystical knowing incorporates both conditioned and unconditioned elements. In the cross-culturally identifiable experience of self-transcendence in meditation, the relationship between the conditioned subject and the unconditioned sacred “object” is transformed, resulting in an intuitive knowledge for which different criteria of (...)
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  45. Arilson Silva Oliveira (2009). Desvendando a religião e as religiões mundiais em Max Weber (Revealing religion and the world religions in Max Weber) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2009v7n14p136. [REVIEW] Horizonte 7 (14):136-155.score: 24.0
    Apresentamos Max Weber como um dos sociólogos e historiadores mais importantes dentre aqueles que se dedicaram ao estudo do fenômeno religioso. Na verdade, é possível afirmar que a análise da religião compreende um dos aspectos mais fundamentais de sua obra sócio-histórica. De modo geral, esse tema aparece em seus textos de duas maneiras diferentes, quais sejam: enquanto um objeto analisado em sua singularidade e enquanto uma manifestação social que influencia de maneira significativa os demais aspectos da vida comunitária. Aqui, observamos (...)
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  46. Bonnie Louise Kuchler (ed.) (2004). One Heart: Universal Wisdom From the World's Scriptures. Marlowe.score: 24.0
    The purpose of One Heart is to illuminate the common sacred ground at the heart of seven faiths: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Taoism. Its method is to identify 65 essential principles, among them: Feel what other people feel; Don't harm others; Lead with virtue and concern for others; Be honest; Practice what you preach; Be content; Don't let anger take over; Choose your companions wisely; Accept the existence of spiritual beings; Seek and you will (...)
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  47. Andrew J. Nicholson (2013). Is Yoga Hindu? On the Fuzziness of Religious Boundaries. Common Knowledge 19 (3):490-505.score: 24.0
    This contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies” explores the boundaries between religions by exploring the ambiguous place of yoga in various religious traditions, both modern and premodern. Recently, certain Hindus and Christians have tried to argue that yoga is an essentially Hindu practice, making their case by appealing to the Yoga Sutras, a text by the Sanskrit author Patanjali. However, on closer examination, the Yoga Sutras seem to exist in a fuzzy, indeterminate space that is not quite “Hindu” (...)
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  48. Ninian Smart (2011). The Yogi and the Devotee (Routledge Revivals): The Interplay Between the Upanishads and Catholic Theology. Routledge.score: 24.0
    First published in 1968, Ninian Smart’s The Yogi and the Devotee: The Interplay Between the Upanishads and Catholic Theology is based on lectures given in Delhi and explores in a novel way the relation between Hinduism and Christianity. The author puts forward a general theory of the relationship between religious experience and doctrines, a theory he had developed in earlier works. He argues that a new form of ‘natural theology’ should be presented, which would show the relevance of (...)
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  49. Karen Armstrong (2006). The Great Transformation: The Beginning of Our Religious Traditions. Knopf.score: 24.0
    In the ninth century BCE, the peoples of four distinct regions of the civilized world created the religious and philosophical traditions that have continued to nourish humanity to the present day: Confucianism and Daoism in China, Hinduism and Buddhism in India, monotheism in Israel, and philosophical rationalism in Greece. Later generations further developed these initial insights, but we have never grown beyond them. Rabbinic Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, for example, were all secondary flowerings of the original Israelite vision. (...)
     
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  50. Richard Garbe (1914). Christian Elements in Later Krishnaism and in Other Hinduistic Sects. The Monist 24 (1):35-66.score: 24.0
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