Search results for 'Hippocratic Oath' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Steven H. Miles (2004). The Hippocratic Oath and the Ethics of Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    This short work examines what the Hippocratic Oath said to Greek physicians 2400 years ago and reflects on its relevance to medical ethics today. Drawing on the writings of ancient physicians, Greek playwrights, and modern scholars, each chapter explores one passage of the Oath and concludes with a modern case discussion. This book is for anyone who loves medicine and is concerned about the ethics and history of the profession.
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  2. Y. Michael Barilan & Moshe Weintraub (2001). Pantagruelism: A Rabelaisian Inspiration for Understanding Poisoning, Euthanasia and Abortion in the Hippocratic Oath and in Contemporary Clinical Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (3):269-286.score: 240.0
    Contrary to the common view, this paper suggests that the Hippocratic oath does not directly refer to the controversial subjects of euthanasia and abortion. We interpret the oath in the context of establishing trust in medicine through departure from Pantagruelism. Pantagruelism is coined after Rabelais' classic novel Gargantua and Pantagruel. His satire about a wonder herb, Pantagruelion, is actually a sophisticated model of anti-medicine in which absence of independent moral values and of properly conducted research fashion a (...)
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  3. Lisa Keränen (2001). The Hippocratic Oath as Epideictic Rhetoric: Reanimating Medicine's Past for Its Future. Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (1):55-68.score: 240.0
    As an example of Aristotle's genre of epideictic, or ceremonial rhetoric, the Hippocratic Oath has the capacity to persuade its self-addressing audience to appreciate the value of the medical profession by lending an element of stability to the shifting ethos of health care. However, the values it celebrates do not accurately capture communally shared norms about contemporary medical practice. Its multiple and sometimes conflicting versions, anachronistic references, and injunctions that resist translation into specific conduct diminish its longer-term persuasive (...)
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  4. Fabrice Jotterand (2005). The Hippocratic Oath and Contemporary Medicine: Dialectic Between Past Ideals and Present Reality? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (1):107 – 128.score: 180.0
    The Hippocratic Oath, the Hippocratic tradition, and Hippocratic ethics are widely invoked in the popular medical culture as conveying a direction to medical practice and the medical profession. This study critically addresses these invocations of Hippocratic guideposts, noting that reliance on the Hippocratic ethos and the Oath requires establishingwhat the Oath meant to its author, its original community of reception, and generally for ancient medicine what relationships contemporary invocations of the Oath (...)
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  5. F. Dominic Degnin (1997). Levinas and the Hippocratic Oath: A Discussion of Physician-Assisted Suicide. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (2):99-123.score: 180.0
    At least from the standpoint of contemporary cultural and ethical resources, physicians have argued eloquently and exhaustively both for and against physician-assisted suicide. If one avoids the temptation to ruthlessly simplify either position to immorality or error, then a strange dilemma arises. How is it that well educated and intelligent physicians, committed strongly and compassionately to the care of their patients, argue adamantly for opposing positions? Thus rather than simply rehashing old arguments, this essay attempts to rethink the nature of (...)
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  6. Robert D. Orr, Norman Pang, Edmund D. Pellegrino & Mark Siegler (1997). Use of the Hippocratic Oath: A Review of Twentieth Century Practice and a Content Analysis of Oaths Administered in Medical Schools in the US and Canada in 1993. [REVIEW] Journal of Clinical Ethics 8 (4):377.score: 150.0
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  7. W. H. S. Jones (1945). The Hippocratic Oath Ludwig Edelstein: The Hippocratic Oath. Text, Translation, and Interpretation. Pp. Vii+64. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1943. Paper, $1.25. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):14-15.score: 150.0
  8. Clifford Allbutt (1925). The Doctor's Oath: The Early Forms of the Hippocratic Oath. With Translations and an Essay. By W. H. S. Jones. One Vol. Pp. 62; 2 MSS. Facsimiles and Medieval Effigy of Hippocrates on Cover. Cambridge: University Press, MCMXXIV. 7s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (5-6):139-.score: 150.0
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  9. Simon Mills (2005). A Review Of: “Stephen H. Miles. 2003.The Hippocratic Oath and the Ethics of Medicine”. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):90-92.score: 150.0
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  10. Pavel Tichtchenko (1994). Resurrection of the Hippocratic Oath in Russia. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (01):49-.score: 150.0
  11. Nada Gosić (2009). The Hippocratic Oath. A Historical Perspective in Bioethical Education. Synthesis Philosophica 23 (2):225-238.score: 150.0
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  12. Edward C. Halperin (1989). Physician Awareness of the Contents of the Hippocratic Oath. Journal of Medical Humanities 10 (2):107-114.score: 150.0
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  13. H. S. Moffic, J. Coverdale & T. Bayer (1990). The Hippocratic Oath and Clinical Ethics. Journal of Clinical Ethics 1 (4):287.score: 150.0
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  14. Lesław T. Niebroj (2007). 'Hippocratic Oath': Is the Prohibition Against Euthanasia Still in Force? Archeus. Studia Z Bioetyki I Antropologii Filozoficznej (Archeus. Studies in Bioethics and Philosophical Anthropology) 8:5-13.score: 150.0
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  15. E. D. Pellegrino (1989). The Hippocratic Oath and Clinical Ethics. Journal of Clinical Ethics 1 (4):290-291.score: 150.0
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  16. Wesley J. Smith (2010). Defending the Hippocratic Oath: The Importance of Conscience in Health Care. Bioethics Research Notes 22 (3):37.score: 150.0
    Smith, Wesley J The growth in policies that force healthcare workers to participate in activities that are deemed both immoral and unprofessional as against the sanctity of human life has given rise to the need for bringing about conscience in health care. The need for fashioning proper conscience clauses and challenges faced in its implementation are highlighted.
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  17. Eric Ashby (1968). A Hippocratic Oath for the Academic Profession. Minerva 7 (1-2):64-66.score: 150.0
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  18. Francis Dominic Degnin (1997). Levinas and the Hippocratic Oath: A Discussion of Physician-Assisted Suicide. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (2):99-123.score: 150.0
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  19. Ludwig Edelstein (1943). The Hippocratic Oath, Text, Translation and Interpretation. Baltimore, the Johns Hopkins Press.score: 150.0
     
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  20. Simon Mills (2005). A Review Of:“Stephen H. Miles. 2003. The Hippocratic Oath and the Ethics of Medicine” New York: Oxford University Press. 208 Pp. $35.00, Hardcover. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):90-92.score: 150.0
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  21. Shlomo Pines (1975). The Oath of Asaph the Physician and Yoḥanan Ben Zabda: Its Relation to the Hippocratic Oath and the Doctrina Duarum Viarum of the Didachē. Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities.score: 150.0
     
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  22. Julius Rocca (2008). Inventing an Ethical Tradition: A Brief History of the Hippocratic Oath. Legal Ethics 11 (1):23-40.score: 150.0
     
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  23. R. M. Veatch (1990). Should We Study the Hippocratic Oath? Journal of Clinical Ethics 1 (4):291.score: 150.0
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  24. Miguel Bedolla (2001). The Oath of the Hippocratic Physician as an Indo-European Formula. Ludus Vitalis 9 (16):47-63.score: 120.0
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  25. Robert M. Veatch (2012). Hippocratic, Religious, and Secular Ethics: The Points of Conflict. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):33-43.score: 92.0
    The origins of professional ethical codes and oaths are explored. Their legitimacy and usefulness within the profession are questioned and an alternative ethical source is suggested. This source relies on a commonly shared, naturally knowable set of principles known as common morality.
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  26. Robert M. Veatch & Carol G. Mason (1987). Hippocratic Vs. Judeo-Christian Medical Ethics: Principles in Conflict. Journal of Religious Ethics 15 (1):86 - 105.score: 60.0
    It is widely presumed, at least among typical Western physicians and medical lay persons, that the Hippocratic and the Judeo-Christian traditions in medical ethics are closely connected or at least compatible. We examine the historical, metaethical, and normative relationships between them, and we find virtually no evidence of any historical links prior to the ninth century. In fact, important differences between them are found. The Hippocratic Oath appears to reflect the environment of a Greek mystery cult. (...)
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  27. Max Anderson (2010). The Mba Oath: Setting a Higher Standard for Business Leaders. Portfolio.score: 60.0
    The trouble with business schools -- The great, but delicate experiment -- A hippocratic oath for business -- Six more arguments for the MBA oath -- The purpose of a manager -- Ethics and integrity -- No man is an island : stakeholders -- Ambition and good faith -- The letter and the spirit : law -- The sunlight of responsibility : transparency -- Personal and professional growth -- Sustainable prosperity : a partnership for living well -- (...)
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  28. Michael Boylan, Hippocrates. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 60.0
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  29. Tom Koch (2013). The Hippocratic Thorn in Bioethics' Hide: Cults, Sects, and Strangeness. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (1):jht056.score: 54.0
    Bioethicists have typically disdained where they did not simply ignore the Hippocratic tradition in medicine. Its exclusivity—an oath of and for physicians—seemed contrary to the perspective that bioethicists have attempted to invoke. Robert M. Veatch recently articulated this rejection of the Hippocratic tradition, and of a professional ethic of medicine in general, in a volume based on his Gifford lectures. Here that argument is critiqued. The strengths of the Hippocratic tradition as a flexible and ethical social (...)
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  30. Michael Davis (2003). What Can We Learn by Looking for the First Code of Professional Ethics? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (5):433-454.score: 30.0
    The first code of professional ethics must: (1)be a code of ethics; (2) apply to members of a profession; (3) apply to allmembers of that profession; and (4) apply only to members of that profession. The value of these criteria depends on how we define “code”, “ethics”, and “profession”, terms the literature on professions has defined in many ways. This paper applies one set of definitions of “code”, “ethics”, and “profession” to a part of what we now know of the (...)
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  31. Ken Wilber, Integral Medicine: A Noetic Reader.score: 30.0
    It always struck me as interesting that a major tenet in the Hippocratic Oath, an oath that in various forms has been taken by many physicians around the world for almost 2,000 years, is simply, "Do no harm to your patients." The positive injunctions are few; but that negative injunction jumps right out at you. Why would it even be necessary to ask a future physician to promise something like that? It is as if Hippocrates understood that, (...)
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  32. Albert R. Jonsen (2000). A Short History of Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    A physician says, "I have an ethical obligation never to cause the death of a patient," another responds, "My ethical obligation is to relieve pain even if the patient dies." The current argument over the role of physicians in assisting patients to die constantly refers to the ethical duties of the profession. References to the Hippocratic Oath are often heard. Many modern problems, from assisted suicide to accessible health care, raise questions about the traditional ethics of medicine and (...)
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  33. J. Félix Lozano Aguilar (2006). Developing an Ethical Code for Engineers: The Discursive Approach. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):245-256.score: 30.0
    From the Hippocratic Oath on, deontological codes and other professional self-regulation mechanisms have been used to legitimize and identify professional groups. New technological challenges and, above all, changes in the socioeconomic environment require adaptable codes which can respond to new demands. We assume that ethical codes for professionals should not simply focus on regulative functions, but must also consider ideological and educative functions. Any adaptations should take into account both contents (values, norms and recommendations) and the drafting process (...)
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  34. Per Sandin (2006). A Paradox Out of Context: Harris and Holm on the Precautionary Principle. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (02):175-183.score: 30.0
    The precautionary principle is frequently referred to in various momentous decisions affecting human health and the environment. It has been invoked in contexts as diverse as chemicals regulation, regulation of genetically modified organisms, and research into life-extending therapies. Precaution is not an unknown concept in medical contexts. One author even cites the Hippocratic Oath as a parallel to the precautionary principle. a.
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  35. D. R. Buchanan & F. G. Miller (2006). A Public Health Perspective on Research Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (12):729-733.score: 30.0
    Ethical guidelines for conducting clinical trials have historically been based on a perceived therapeutic obligation to treat and benefit the patient-participants. The origins of this ethical framework can be traced to the Hippocratic oath originally written to guide doctors in caring for their patients, where the overriding moral obligation of doctors is strictly to do what is best for the individual patient, irrespective of other social considerations. In contrast, although medicine focuses on the health of the person, public (...)
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  36. Seetharaman Hariharan, Ramesh Jonnalagadda, Errol Walrond & Harley Moseley (2006). Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice of Healthcare Ethics and Law Among Doctors and Nurses in Barbados. BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-9.score: 30.0
    Background The aim of the study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices among healthcare professionals in Barbados in relation to healthcare ethics and law in an attempt to assist in guiding their professional conduct and aid in curriculum development. Methods A self-administered structured questionnaire about knowledge of healthcare ethics, law and the role of an Ethics Committee in the healthcare system was devised, tested and distributed to all levels of staff at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Barbados (a (...)
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  37. Laurence B. McCullough (2005). The Critical Turn in Clinical Ethics and its Continous Enhancement. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (1):1 – 8.score: 30.0
    Taking the critical turn is one of the main tools of the humanities and inculcates an intellectual discipline that prevents ossification of thinking about issues and of organizational policies in clinical ethics. The articles in this "Clinical Ethics" number of the Journal take the critical turn with respect to cherished ways of thinking in Western clinical ethics, life extension, the clinical determination of death, physicians' duty to treat even at personal risk, clinical ethics at the interface of research ethics, and (...)
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  38. Hillel D. Braude (2013). Affecting the Body and Transforming Desire: The Treatment of Suffering as the End of Medicine. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (4):265-278.score: 30.0
    I will apply dietetic measures for the benefit of the sick according to my ability and judgment. I will keep them from harm and injustice. The Hippocratic Oath formulates the ethical principle of medical beneficence and its negative formulation non-maleficence. It relates medical ethics to the traditional end of medicine, that is, to heal, or to make whole. First and foremost, the duty of the physician is to heal, and if this is not possible at least not to (...)
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  39. Barbara MacKinnon (1988). On Not Harming: Two Traditions. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 13 (3):313-328.score: 30.0
    While ancient in origin, the principle, "Do No Harm," continues to occupy a prominent place in many present-day medical ethics codes. Of all the versions of the principle two distinct varieties can be distinguished. These parallel two ethical traditions. This paper develops the contrast between the two versions, relates them to the two ongoing ethical traditions, and then uses insights from contemporary ethical theory to demonstrate the significance of one of the versions. Finally it suggests some contemporary applications for a (...)
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  40. P. D. Scripko (2010). Enhancement's Place in Medicine. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):293-296.score: 30.0
    Many enhancement technologies are distributed by healthcare professionals—by physicians—who are held to the Hippocratic Oath and the goals of medicine. While the ethics of enhancement has been widely discussed with regard to the social justice, humanism, morals and normative values of these interventions, their place in medicine has not attracted a great deal of attention. This paper investigates the potential for enhancement technologies to fulfil the goals of medicine, arguing that they play a role in promoting the health (...)
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  41. Sean Murphy & Stephen J. Genuis (2013). Freedom of Conscience in Health Care: Distinctions and Limits. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):347-354.score: 30.0
    The widespread emergence of innumerable technologies within health care has complicated the choices facing caregivers and their patients. The escalation of knowledge and technical innovation has been accompanied by an erosion of moral and ethical consensus among health providers that is reflected in the abandonment of the Hippocratic Oath as the immutable bedrock of medical ethics. Ethical conflicts arise when the values of health professionals collide with the expressed wishes of patients or the dictates of regulatory bodies and (...)
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  42. Robin Attfield (2001). To Do No Harm? The Precautionary Principle and Moral Values. Philosophy of Management 1 (3):11-20.score: 30.0
    From over 2000 years ago the ideal expressed in the Hippocratic Oath has encouraged doctors never knowingly to do harm: primum non nocere. Over 25 years ago the management writer Peter Drucker proposed it as the basis of a management ethic, ‘the right rule for the ethics managers need, the ethics of responsibility’. He argued then that the rule had wide scope encompassing for instance executive compensation, management rhetoric and the management of business impacts. In 2000 the United (...)
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  43. I. E. Thompson (1979). The Nature of Confidentiality. Journal of Medical Ethics 5 (2):57-64.score: 30.0
    This paper examines confidentiality and its nature and analyses the guidelines laid down by the Hippocratic Oath as well as the British and World Medical Associations for maintaining such confidentiality between doctor and patient. There are exceptions to practically any code of rules and this is true also for confidentiality. Some of these exceptions make it appear that very little is confidential. The three values implicit in confidentiality would seem to be privacy, confidence and secrecy. Each of these (...)
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  44. Dr J. Félix Lozano Aguilar (2006). Developing an Ethical Code for Engineers: The Discursive Approach. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):245-256.score: 30.0
    From the Hippocratic Oath on, deontological codes and other professional self-regulation mechanisms have been used to legitimize and identify professional groups. New technological challenges and, above all, changes in the socioeconomic environment require adaptable codes which can respond to new demands.We assume that ethical codes for professionals should not simply focus on regulative functions, but must also consider ideological and educative functions. Any adaptations should take into account both contents (values, norms and recommendations) and the drafting process itself.In (...)
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  45. Physician S. Oath (1992). The Code of Medical Ethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 2.score: 30.0
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  46. Chester R. Burns (ed.) (1977). Legacies in Ethics and Medicine. Science History Publications.score: 30.0
    Burns, C. R. Introduction.--Antiquity: Margalith, D. The ideal doctor as depicted in ancient Hebrew writings. Edelstein, L. The Hippocratic oath. Edelstein, L. The professional ethics of the Greek physician. Michler, M. Medical ethics in Hippocratic bone surgery. Maas, P. L., Oliver, J. H. An ancient poem on the duties of a physician.--The medieval era: Levey, M. Medical deontology in ninth century Islam. Bar-Sela, A., Hoff, H. E. Isaac Israeli's fifty admonitions of the physicians. Rosner, F. The physician's (...)
     
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  47. Edward J. O'Boyle (2011). Anderson and Escher's The MBA Oath: Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):285 - 295.score: 24.0
    Max Anderson and Peter Escher's The MBA Oath addresses the need for a set of ethical standards to provide guidance to MBA graduates as they go about their everyday professional business. Their oath is relevant to the concerns of others in business but clearly was inspired by the special problems they encountered in the classroom as members of the Harvard MBA class of 2009. The oath and the book itself evolved from the financial meltdown of 2008 for (...)
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  48. Daniel P. Sulmasy (1999). What is an Oath and Why Should a Physician Swear One? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (4):329-346.score: 20.0
    While there has been much discussion about the role of oaths in medical ethics, this discussion has previously centered on the content of various oaths. Little conceptual work has been done to clarify what an oath is, or to show how an oath differs from a promise or a code of ethics, or to explore what general role oath-taking by physicians might play in medical ethics. Oaths, like promises, are performative utterances. But oaths are generally characterized by (...)
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  49. W. Balzer & A. Eleftheriadis (1991). A Reconstruction of the Hippocratic Humoral Theory of Health. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 22 (2):207-227.score: 18.0
    Summary The model underlying the hippocratic humoral theory, as well as the corresponding part of hippocratic aetiology is reconstructed in precise, structuralist terms. Stress is laid on the presentation of the model, historical and philological derivations are suppressed. The global net structure of humoral theory in which the different diseases are described as specializations of the basic model is worked out, and the particular metatheoretical features of ‘therapeutical’ theories, as contrasted to ‘descriptive’ theories, are exemplified and stated in (...)
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  50. Michael Boylan (1984). The Galenic and Hippocratic Challenges to Aristotle's Conception Theory. Journal of the History of Biology 17 (1):83 - 112.score: 18.0
    As a result of this case study, additional questions arise. These can be cast into at least three groups. The first concerns the development of critical empiricism in the ancient world: a topic of much interest in our own century, expecially with regard to the work of the logical empiricists. Many of the same arguments are present in the ancient world and were hotly debated from the Hippocratic writers through and beyond Galen. Some of the ways in which Galen (...)
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