Search results for 'Historicism' (try it on Scholar)

784 found
Order:
  1. of Walter Benjamin'S. Deconstruction & Of Historicism (2009). Bruce Ross. In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (ed.), Existence, Historical Fabulation, Destiny. Springer Verlag 231.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  35
    Shelley Tremain (2015). This is What a Historicist and Relativist Feminist Philosophy of Disability Looks Like. Foucault Studies (19).
    ABSTRACT: With this article, I advance a historicist and relativist feminist philosophy of disability. I argue that Foucault’s insights offer the most astute tools with which to engage in this intellectual enterprise. Genealogy, the technique of investigation that Friedrich Nietzsche famously introduced and that Foucault took up and adapted in his own work, demonstrates that Foucault’s historicist approach has greater explanatory power and transgressive potential for analyses of disability than his critics in disability studies have thus far recognized. I show (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  65
    Frederick C. Beiser (2011). The German Historicist Tradition. Oxford University Press.
    This is the first full study in English of the German historicist tradition. Frederick C. Beiser surveys the major German thinkers on history from the middle of the eighteenth century until the early twentieth century, providing an introduction to each thinker and the main issues in interpreting and appraising his thought. The volume offers new interpretations of well-known philosophers such as Johann Gottfried Herder and Max Weber, and introduces others who are scarcely known at all, including J. A. Chladenius, Justus (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  4.  41
    David Zimmerman (2002). Reasons-Responsiveness and Ownership-of-Agency: Fischer and Ravizza's Historicist Theory of Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 6 (3):199-234.
    No one has done more than John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza to advance our understanding of the important dispute in the theory of responsibility between structuralists and historicists. This makes it all the more important to take the measure of Responsibility and Control, their most recent contribution to the historicist side of the discussion. In this paper I examine some novel features of their most recent version of responsiblity-historicism, especially their new notions of "moderate reasons-responsiveness" and "ownership-of-agency." Fischer (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  5.  29
    Ishtiyaque Haji (2013). Historicism, Non-Historicism, or a Mix? Journal of Ethics 17 (3):185-204.
    This paper revisits the issue of whether responsibility is essentially historical. Roughly, the leading question here is this: Do ways in which we can acquire pertinent antecedents of action, such as beliefs, desires, and values, have an essential bearing on whether we are responsible for actions that are suitably related to these antecedents? I argue, first, that Michael McKenna’s interesting case for nonhistoricism is indecisive, and, second, his brand of modest historicism, while highly insightful, yields results concerning responsibility that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  91
    Nathaniel Jason Goldberg (2009). Historicism, Entrenchment, and Conventionalism. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 40 (2):259 - 276.
    W. V. Quine famously argues that though all knowledge is empirical, mathematics is entrenched relative to physics and the special sciences. Further, entrenchment accounts for the necessity of mathematics relative to these other disciplines. Michael Friedman challenges Quine’s view by appealing to historicism, the thesis that the nature of science is illuminated by taking into account its historical development. Friedman argues on historicist grounds that mathematical claims serve as principles constitutive of languages within which empirical claims in physics and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7.  22
    Mark Bevir (2012). In Defence of Historicism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (1):111-114.
    Abstract This paper defends a historicist approach to the history of ideas. A historicist ontology implies that texts have meaning only for specific people, whether these be individual authors, particular readers, or the intersubjective beliefs of social groups. Texts do not have intrinsic meanings in themselves.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  69
    Guy S. Axtell (1993). In the Tracks of the Historicist Movement: Re-Assessing the Carnap-Kuhn Connection. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 24 (1):119-146.
    Thirty years after the publication of Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, sharp disagreement persists concerning the implications of Kuhn’s "historicist" challenge to empiricism. I discuss the historicist movement over the past thirty years, and the extent to which the discourse between two branches of the historical school has been influenced by tacit assumptions shared with Rudolf Carnap’s empiricism. I begin with an examination of Carnap’s logicism --his logic of science-- and his 1960 correspondence with Kuhn. I focus on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  9.  25
    Herman J. Paul (2008). A Collapse of Trust: Reconceptualizing the Crisis of Historicism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (1):63-82.
    This essay redefines the crisis of historicism as a collapse of trust. Following Friedrich Jaeger, it suggests that this crisis should be understood, not as a crisis caused by historicist methods, but as a crisis faced by the classical historicist tradition of Ranke. The "nihilism" and "moral relativism" feared by Troeltsch's generation did not primarily refer to the view that moral universals did not exist; rather, they expressed that the historical justification of bildungsbürgerliche values offered by classical historicism (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  10.  65
    Mark Bevir (2009). Contextualism: From Modernist Method to Post-Analytic Historicism? Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (3):211-224.
    This article provides a critical history of the Cambridge School of intellectual history. Laslett's work on Locke appeared to vindicate modernist historicism. Laslett shunned the broad narratives of romantic developmental historicists. He relied on bibliographies, unpublished manuscripts, and other evidence to establish atomized facts and thus textual interpretations. Pocock and Skinner's theories defended modernist historicism. They argued historians should situate texts in contexts and prove interpretations correct by using modernist methods to establish empirical facts. They attacked approaches that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  45
    Frank Ankersmit (2010). The Necessity of Historicism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2):226-240.
    Rankean historicism is ordinarily seen nowadays as an outdated nineteenth century fashion and that we could not possibly tolerate in our modern intellectual homes. In opposition to this common wisdom I argue that historicism - i.e. the claim that the nature of a thing is to be found in is history - is no less true for all writing of history as it was in the days of Ranke. So Ranke was right, after all. I shall argue my (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  25
    Peter Woodford (2012). Specters of the Nineteenth Century: Charles Taylor and the Problem of Historicism. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (1):171-192.
    This paper identifies and analyzes the problem of historicism in Charles Taylor's work overall, but with particular emphasis on his most recent publication, A Secular Age. I circumscribe the problem of historicism through reference to the nineteenth-century German philosophical tradition in which it developed, in particular in the thought of Wilhelm Dilthey. I then trace the structural similarities between the notions of history to be found in the thought of Taylor and Dilthey and how these structural similarities raise (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  32
    Colin Koopman (2010). Historicism in Pragmatism: Lessons in Historiography and Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 41 (5):690-713.
    Abstract: Pragmatism involves simultaneous commitments to modes of inquiry that are philosophical and historical. This article begins by demonstrating this point as it is evidenced in the historicist pragmatisms of William James and John Dewey. Having shown that pragmatism focuses philosophical attention on concrete historical processes, the article turns to a discussion of the specific historiographical commitments consistent with this focus. This focus here is on a pragmatist version of historical inquiry in terms of the central historiographical categories of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  5
    Michael Keaney (1997). The Poverty of Rhetoricism: Popper, Mises and the Riches of Historicism. History of the Human Sciences 10 (1):1-22.
    The attacks on historicism by radical individualists such as Popper and Mises have had lasting repercussions in the social sciences. Specifically, the term is used to connote deterministic, teleological theories of history, associated with Hegelian notions of destiny and positivist ideas of historical laws. This article argues that historicism is very different in character, in that it essentially amounts to the belief that social science and history are one and the same, whilst emphasizing the separate epis temology of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  28
    Reinbert A. Krol (2010). Friedrich Meinecke: Panentheism and the Crisis of Historicism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2):195-209.
    Friedrich Meinecke's Die Idee der Staatsräson (1924) is generally seen as the study in which he replaced his monistic-idealistic philosophy of history - as articulated in Weltbürgertum und Nationalstaat - by a dualistic worldview. In this article I will argue against this view. I will do so on the basis of a brief analysis of Meinecke's Staatsräson -study. I will show that Meinecke succeeded in combining his monism and his dualism within a so-called (harmonious) 'panentheistic' philosophy. Next, when discussing Meinecke's (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  30
    Jaap den Hollander (2010). Beyond Historicism: From Leibniz to Luhmann. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2):210-225.
    The phrase 'beyond historicism' is usually associated with Bielefeld historians like Hans Ulrich Wehler and Jürgen Kocka, who attempted to turn the study of history into a social science, but a better candidate would be the sociologist Niklas Luhmann, who happened to teach as well in Bielefeld during the 1970's and 1980's. Luhmann had little affinity with the project of his colleagues from the history department. He took the opposite view that the social sciences suffered from a naive enlightenment (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  15
    David Henderson (2012). Neuraths Boat Will Take You Where You Want to Go: On Naturalized Epistemology and Historicism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (3):389-414.
    Naturalized epistemology is not a recent invention, nor is it a philosophical invention. Rather, it is a cognitive phenomena that is pervasive and desirable in the way of human epistemic engagement with their world. It is a matter of the way that one’s cognitive processes can be modulated by information gotten from those same or wider cognitive processes. Such modulational control enhances the reliability of one’s cognitive processes in many ways ‐ and judgments about objective epistemic justification consistently evince a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  1
    Nathaniel Jason Goldberg (2009). Historicism, Entrenchment, and Conventionalism. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 40 (2):259-276.
    W. V. Quine famously argues that though all knowledge is empirical, mathematics is entrenched relative to physics and the special sciences. Further, entrenchment accounts for the necessity of mathematics relative to these other disciplines. Michael Friedman challenges Quine’s view by appealing to historicism, the thesis that the nature of science is illuminated by taking into account its historical development. Friedman argues on historicist grounds that mathematical claims serve as principles constitutive of languages within which empirical claims in physics and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  26
    Wenxi Zhang (2006). The Concept of Nature and Historicism in Marx. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (4):630-642.
    Scholars of Marx often spend much effort to emphasize the socio-historical characteristics of Marx's concept of nature. At the same time, from this concept of nature, one seems to be able to deduce a strong sense of historical anthropocentricism and relativism. But through an exploration of the results of Rorty's discarding the distinction between "natural" and "man-made" and Strauss' clearing up value relativism in terms of the concept of nature, people will find that historicism is a world outlook that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  18
    Peter Vogt (2010). Why We Cannot Make History. Some Remarks on a Lesson From Early Historicism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2):121-137.
    There are various perspectives from which the meaning of historicism can be understood. Historically, the interpretation of historicism has predominantly been interested in either questions concerning historical methodology, or the relationship between the natural and human sciences, or the normative consequences of historicism. My intention is not to cast doubt upon the legitimacy of these different research approaches, but rather to supplement them by confronting the meaning of historicism from the perspective of a different question. Did (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  18
    Herman Paul (2010). Religion and the Crisis of Historicism: Protestant and Catholic Perspectives. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2):172-194.
    This paper raises the question to what extent the crisis of historicism is to be seen as a religious problem. There is, of course, no need to argue that religion in a broad sense of the word - ultimate concerns and fundamental values - played major roles in the debates over historicism. However, virtually no studies have been conducted on how the crisis of historicism can be "mapped" on the religious landscape in a more specific sense. Which (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  5
    Herman Paul (2012). Weak Historicism: On Hierarchies of Intellectual Virtues and Goods. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (3):369-388.
    This article seeks to reconcile a historicist sensitivity to how intellectually virtuous behavior is shaped by historical contexts with a non-relativist account of historical scholarship. To that end, it distinguishes between hierarchies of intellectual virtues and hierarchies of intellectual goods . The first hierarchy rejects a one-size-fits-all model of historical virtuousness in favor of a model that allows for significant varieties between the relative weight that historians must assign to intellectual virtues in order to acquire justified historical understanding. It grounds (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  1
    Herman Paul (2010). Who Suffered From the Crisis of Historicism? A Dutch Example. History and Theory 49 (2):169-193.
    Was the crisis of historicism an exclusively German affair? Or was it a “narrowly academic crisis,” as is sometimes assumed? Answering both questions in the negative, this paper argues that crises of historicism affected not merely intellectual elites, but even working-class people, not only in Germany, but also in the Netherlands. With an elaborated case study, the article shows that Dutch “neo-Calvinist” Protestants from the 1930s onward experienced their own crisis of historicism. For a variety of reasons, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  6
    Robert D'Amico (1989). Historicism and Knowledge. Routledge.
    A critical account of the case for historicism from Popper to Foucault, this volume, originally published in 1989, shows the viability of an historicist account of knowledge by replying to traditional objections and the need for defenses of realism and reference at the heart of most alternatives to historicism. The book provides insights to those in philosophy as well as literary criticism, intellectual history, history of science, and cultural criticism.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  7
    Thomas A. Howard (2000). Religion and the Rise of Historicism: W.M.L. De Wette, Jacob Burckhardt, and the Theological Origins of Nineteenth-Century Historical Consciousness. [REVIEW] Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers an interpretation of the rise of secular historical thought in nineteenth-century Europe. Instead of characterizing 'historicism' and 'secularization' as fundamental breaks with Europe's religious heritage, they are presented as complex cultural permutations with much continuity; for inherited theological patterns of interpreting experience determined to a large degree the conditions, possibilities, and limitations of the forms of historical imagination realizable by nineteenth-century secular intellectuals. This point is made by examining the thought of the German theologian W. M. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  12
    Carla Mazzio & Douglas Trevor (eds.) (2000). Historicism, Psychoanalysis, and Early Modern Culture. Routledge.
    Did people in early modern Europe have a concept of an inner self? Carla Mazzio and Douglas Trevor have brought together an outstanding group of literary, cultural, and history scholars to answer this intriguing question. Through a synthesis of historicism and psychoanalytic criticism, the contributors explore the complicated, nuanced, and often surprising union of history and subjectivity in Europe centuries before psychoanalytic theory. Addressing such topics as "fetishes and Renaissances," "the cartographic unconscious," and "the topographic imaginary," these essays move (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Carl Page (1995). Philosophical Historicism and the Betrayal of First Philosophy. Penn State University Press.
    The recent emergence, among philosophers, of the view that the activity of human reason in all its possible modes must also be historicized, including the activity of philosophizing itself, may be found in writers as diverse as Hans-Georg Gadamer, Richard Rorty, Michel Foucault, and Alasdair MacIntyre. This contemporary view of human reason contrasts with the traditional commitments of "First Philosophy," Aristotle's name for the knowledge of things through their ultimate causes and principles. This book challenges the prevailing historicist orthodoxies about (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Charles R. Bambach (1995). Heidegger, Dilthey, and the Crisis of Historicism. Cornell University Press.
  29.  36
    Massimiliano Tomba (2009). Historical Temporalities of Capital: An Anti-Historicist Perspective. Historical Materialism 17 (4):44-65.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30.  7
    Andrew Kirkpatrick (2014). Modernity, Post-Modernity and Proto-Historicism: Reorienting Humanity Through a New Sense of Narrative Emplotment. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (2):22-77.
    As a grand narrative of progress, the utopian project of modernity is primarily concerned with notions of rationalism, universalism, and the development of a metalanguage. The triumph of the Moderate Enlightenment has seen logics of domination, accumulation and individualism incorporated into the project of modernity, with these logics giving rise to globalised capitalism as the metalanguage of modernity and neoliberal economics as the grand narrative of rational progress. The project of modernity is all but complete, requiring (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  38
    Gustav Bergmann (1944). Holism, Historicism, and Emergence. Philosophy of Science 11 (March):209-21.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  63
    John E. Grumley (1989). History and Totality: Radical Historicism From Hegel to Foucault. Routledge.
    Introduction Philosophy, Georg Lukacs once observed, originally arose as a cultural response to loss. The unified totality of immediate, meaningful social ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33.  1
    Fulvio Tessitore (2011). A Taking Leave or a Renaissance of Historicism? Rivista di Filosofia 102 (3):445-476.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  1
    Zhang Wenxi (2006). The Concept of Nature and Historicism in Marx. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (4):630-642.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Arnaldo Momigliano (1974). Historicism Revisited. North-Holland Pub. Co..
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  20
    Peter Hanns Reill (1975). The German Enlightenment and the Rise of Historicism. University of California Press.
    Introduction i In an important study of the German Enlightenment, Max Wundt wryly observed that the term "Enlightenment" shed very little enlightenment upon ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Carolyn Williams (1989). Transfigured World Walter Pater's Aesthetic Historicism. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Karl Popper (2013). The Poverty of Historicism. Routledge.
    On its publication in 1957, _The Poverty of Historicism_ was hailed by Arthur Koestler as 'probably the only book published this year which will outlive the century.' A devastating criticism of fixed and predictable laws in history, Popper dedicated the book to all those 'who fell victim to the fascist and communist belief in Inexorable Laws of Historical Destiny.' Short and beautifully written, it has inspired generations of readers, intellectuals and policy makers. One of the most important books on the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  39.  35
    Giuseppina D'oro (2011). The Myth of Collingwood's Historicism. Inquiry 53 (6):627-641.
    This paper seeks to clarify the precise sense in which Collingwood's “metaphysics without ontology” is a descriptive metaphysics. It locates Collingwood's metaphysics against the background of Strawson's distinction between descriptive and revisionary metaphysics and then defends it against the claim that Collingwood reduced metaphysics to a form of cultural anthropology. Collingwood's metaphysics is descriptive not because it is some sort of historicised psychology that describes temporally parochial and historically shifting assumptions, but because it is a high level form of conceptual (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  40.  5
    Robert Piercey (2016). Hermeneutics Without Historicism: Heidegger, MacIntyre, and the Function of the University. The European Legacy 21 (3):245-265.
    Martin Heidegger and Alasdair MacIntyre both claim that universities perform important philosophical functions. This essay reconstructs Heidegger’s and MacIntyre’s views of the university and argues that they have a common source, which I call hermeneutics without historicism. Heidegger and MacIntyre are hermeneutical philosophers: philosophers who are sensitive to the ways in which thought is mediated by interpretation and conditioned by history and culture. But both of them reject the relativistic historicism sometimes associated with a hermeneutical approach to philosophy. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  2
    John Zammito (2004). Reconstructing German Idealism and Romanticism: Historicism and Presentism. Modern Intellectual History 1 (3):427-438.
    Frederick Beiser, German Idealism: The Struggle Against Subjectivism, 1781–1801 Robert Richards, The Romantic Conception of Life: Science and Philosophy in the Age of Goethe All art should become science and all science art; poetry and philosophy should be made one. Friedrich Schlegel, Kritische Fragmente When two major studies on the same thematic appear roughly simultaneously, integrating not only their authors' respective careers but the revisions of a whole generation of scholarship, the moment cries out for stock-taking, both substantively and methodologically. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  42.  2
    M. A. Rothenberg (2006). Embodied Political Performativity in Excitable Speech: Butler's Psychoanalytic Revision of Historicism. Theory, Culture and Society 23 (4):71-93.
    The critical commentary on Judith Butler’s Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative focuses primarily on her use of speech-act theory for political purposes. Admitting the limitations of Austin’s work, she introduces an extended supplement to her linguistically based performative theory in Excitable Speech: a discussion of embodied subjectivity presented in ways never before instanced in her work. That is, in this text, she continues to use speech-act theory articulated with Derridean iterability to ground performativity, while presenting a version of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43.  37
    Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2011). Black Orpheus and Aesthetic Historicism: On Vico and Negritude. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 19 (2):121-135.
    This essay offers a novel approach for understanding the poetry of negritude and its role in the struggle for black liberation by appealing to Giambattista Vico’s insights on the historical, cultural, and myth-making function of poetry and of the mythopoetic imagination. The essay begins with a discussion of Vico’s aesthetic historicism and of his ideas regarding the role of imagination, poetry, and myth-making and then brings these ideas to bear on the discussion of the function of negritude poetry, focusing (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  2
    Joseph Femia (1981). An Historicist Critique of "Revisionist" Methods for Studying the History of Ideas. History and Theory 20 (2):113-134.
    Revisionists such as Quentin Skinner, J. G. A. Pocock, and John Dunn argue that in order to understand an historical text, one must recover the particularity of intended meaning. According to this view, in the sphere of political/ social reality, thought has no universal truth, no independence of its context, no significance for the present, and no meaning beyond the author's intentions. Although this is a variant of classic historicism, it goes far beyond the latter. A study of Gramsci's (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  45.  16
    Christian J. Emden (2006). Toward a Critical Historicism: History and Politics in Nietzsche's Second “Untimely Meditation”. Modern Intellectual History 3 (1):1-31.
    Focusing on the close connection between Friedrich Nietzsche's historical thought and the discourse of German historicism in the second half of the nineteenth century, this article argues in a thick contextual reading that Nietzsche's second VomNutzenundNachtheilderHistoriefürdasLeben(1874), needs to be understood as a reflection on the political dimension of historical consciousness, outlining what I shall term a In contrast to the standard emphasis on Nietzsche's presumed aestheticism, he is shown to react to rather specific developments within the contemporary intellectual context, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  55
    Frederick Beiser (2008). Historicism and Neo-Kantianism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (4):554-564.
    This article treats the conflict between historicism and neo-Kantianism in the late nineteenth century by a careful examination of the writings of Wilhelm Windelband, the leader of the Southwestern neo-Kantians. Historicism was a profound challenge to the fundamental principles of Kant’s philosophy because it seemed to imply that there are no universal and necessary principles of science, ethics or aesthetics. Since all such principles are determined by their social and historical context, they differ with each culture and epoch. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  35
    W. A. Suchting (1972). Marx, Popper, and 'Historicism'. Inquiry 15 (1-4):235 – 266.
    According to Sir Karl Popper, there is a harmful approach to the social sciences called 'historicism'. This takes their principal aim to be historical prediction of an unconditional sort and the chief means to this the discovery of laws of historical development. The chief exemplar is held to be Marx. This paper distinguishes two possible sorts of laws of historical development. Popper's arguments against each are rejected. Which sort it is most plausible to ascribe to Marx is considered. Four (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  5
    Jürgen Pieters (2000). New Historicism: Postmodern Historiography Between Narrativism and Heterology. History and Theory 39 (1):21–38.
    In recent discussions of the work of new historicist critics like Stephen Greenblatt and Louis Montrose, it has often been remarked that the theory of history underlying their reading practice closely resembles that of postmodern historiographers like Hayden White and Frank Ankersmit. Taking off from one such remark, the aim of the present article is twofold. First, I intend to provide a theoretical basis from which to substantiate the idea that new historicism can indeed be taken to be the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49.  19
    James Newlin (2013). The Touch of the Real in New Historicism and Psychoanalysis. Substance 42 (1):82-101.
    "poor Lear...""Well, well; the event."Let us begin, as the New Historicist Stephen Greenblatt does in his essay "Marlowe, Marx, and Anti-Semitism,"1 with a fantasy. Consider the highly unlikely scenario of a graduate student in English, well versed in the methods of psychoanalysis, Lacanian methods in particular, yet wholly unaware of the New Historicism and its occasional skirmishes with psychoanalytic reading. Then, what if this theoretical student somehow stumbled upon Greenblatt's famous phrase and formulation for the New Historicist ideal, The (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  14
    Sarah Maza (2004). Stephen Greenblatt, New Historicism, and Cultural History, or, What We Talk About When We Talk About Interdisciplinarity. Modern Intellectual History 1 (2):249-265.
    Michael Warner, a literary critic with a keen sense of history, wrote in 1987 that “New Historicism is a label that historians don't like very much because they understand something different by historicism. But nobody's asking historians….” This essay is an answer to questions nobody asked me, questions about interdisciplinarity and the differences between literary critical and historical practices. A return to historically informed literary criticism, which many critics still consider a dominant trend in the profession, emerged (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 784