Search results for 'History of Science' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Joseph C. Pitt & International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science (1985). Change and Progress in Modern Science Papers Related to and Arising From the Fourth International Conference on History and Philosophy of Science, Blacksburg, Virginia, November 1982.
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  2. Aaron D. Cobb (2011). History and Scientific Practice in the Construction of an Adequate Philosophy of Science: Revisiting a Whewell/Mill Debate. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):85-93.
    William Whewell raised a series of objections concerning John Stuart Mill’s philosophy of science which suggested that Mill’s views were not properly informed by the history of science or by adequate reflection on scientific practices. The aim of this paper is to revisit and evaluate this incisive Whewellian criticism of Mill’s views by assessing Mill’s account of Michael Faraday’s discovery of electrical induction. The historical evidence demonstrates that Mill’s reconstruction is an inadequate reconstruction of this historical episode (...)
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  3.  4
    Roberto de Andrade Martins, Cibelle Celestino Silva & Maria Elice Brzezinski Prestes (2014). History and Philosophy of Science in Science Education, in Brazil. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer 2271-2299.
    This paper addresses the context of emergence, development, and current status of the use of history and philosophy of science in science education in Brazil. After a short overview of the three areas (history of science, philosophy of science, and science education) in Brazil, the paper focuses on the application of this approach to teaching physics, chemistry, and biology at the secondary school level. The first Brazilian researches along this line appeared more consistently (...)
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  4.  6
    John L. Taylor & Andrew Hunt (2014). History and Philosophy of Science and the Teaching of Science in England. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer 2045-2081.
    This chapter relates a broadly chronological story of the developments over the last 50 years that have sought to reshape the science curriculum in English schools by introducing aspects of the history of science and nature of science. The chapter highlights key curriculum projects by outlining the contexts in which they developed and summarising their rationales as set out in their publications. It also provides signposts to some of the reports of research and scholarship that have (...)
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  5.  4
    Mark A. Winstanley (2016). Genetic Epistemology, a Universalist Approach to the History of Science. Journal of the Philosophy of History 10 (2):249-278.
    _ Source: _Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 249 - 278 GER Lloyd discerns two conflicting hypotheses concerning human cognition: cross-cultural universality and cultural relativity. The history of science is one discipline among many actively contributing to our understanding of human cognition at present. Not surprisingly, then, the dichotomy is also present in the history of science. In contrast to current approaches to the history of science, which highlight cultural relativity, genetic epistemology, which is conceived (...)
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  6.  5
    J. C. Pinto de Oliveira (2015). Carnap, Kuhn, and the History of Science: A Reply to Thomas Uebel. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 46 (1):215-223.
    The purpose of this article is to respond to Thomas Uebel’s criticisms of my comments regarding the current revisionism of Carnap’s work and its relations to Kuhn. I begin by pointing out some misunderstandings in the interpretation of my article. I then discuss some aspects related to Carnap’s view of the history of science. First, I emphasize that it was not due to a supposed affinity between Kuhn’s conceptions and those of logical positivists that Kuhn was invited to (...)
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  7.  56
    Elaine Maria Paiva de Andrade, Jean Faber & Luiz Pinguelli Rosa (2013). A Spontaneous Physics Philosophy on the Concept of Ether Throughout the History of Science: Birth, Death and Revival. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 18 (3):559-577.
    In the course of the history of science, some concepts have forged theoretical foundations, constituting paradigms that hold sway for substantial periods of time. Research on the history of explanations of the action of one body on another is a testament to the periodic revival of one theory in particular, namely, the theory of ether. Even after the foundation of modern Physics, the notion of ether has directly and indirectly withstood the test of time. Through a spontaneous (...)
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  8.  1
    Mark A. Winstanley (forthcoming). Genetic Epistemology, a Universalist Approach to the History of Science. New Content is Available for Journal of the Philosophy of History.
    _ Source: _Page Count 30 GER Lloyd discerns two conflicting hypotheses concerning human cognition: cross-cultural universality and cultural relativity. The history of science is one discipline among many actively contributing to our understanding of human cognition at present. Not surprisingly, then, the dichotomy is also present in the history of science. In contrast to current approaches to the history of science, which highlight cultural relativity, genetic epistemology, which is conceived by Jean Piaget as a (...)
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  9.  15
    Michael R. Matthews (2014). Introduction: The History, Purpose and Content of the Springer International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. In International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer 1-15.
    This is the first handbook to be published that is devoted to the field of historical and philosophical research in science and mathematics education (HPS&ST). Given that science and mathematics through their long history have always been engaged with philosophy and that for over a century it has been recognised that science and mathematics curriculum development, teaching, assessment and learning give rise to so many historical and philosophical questions, it is unfortunate that such a handbook has (...)
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  10.  22
    Richard Creath (2010). The Role of History in Science. Journal of the History of Biology 43 (2):207 - 214.
    The case often made by scientists (and philosophers) against history and the history of science in particular is clear. Insofar as a field of study is historical as opposed to law-based, it is trivial. Insofar as a field attends to the past of science as opposed to current scientific issues, its efforts are derivative and, by diverting attention from acquiring new knowledge, deplorable. This case would be devastating if true, but it has almost everything almost exactly (...)
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  11.  23
    Frédéric Vandermoere & Raf Vanderstraeten (2012). Disciplinary Networks and Bounding: Scientific Communication Between Science and Technology Studies and the History of Science. [REVIEW] Minerva 50 (4):451-470.
    This article examines the communication networks within and between science and technology studies (STS) and the history of science. In particular, journal relatedness data are used to analyze some of the structural features of their disciplinary identities and relationships. The results first show that, although the history of science is more than half a century older than STS, the size of the STS network is more than twice that of the history of science (...)
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  12.  5
    Paula Viterbo (2007). History of Science as Interdisciplinary Education in American Colleges: Its Origins, Advantages, and Pitfalls. Journal of Research Practice 3 (2):Article M16.
    Before 1950, history of science did not exist as an independent academic branch, but was instead pursued by practitioners across various humanities and scientific disciplines. After professionalization, traces of its prehistory as a cross-disciplinary area of interest bound to an interdisciplinary, educational philosophy have remained. This essay outlines the development of history of science as an interdisciplinary academic field, and argues that it constitutes an obvious choice for inclusion in an interdisciplinary academic program, provided faculty and (...)
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  13.  19
    Thomas Uebel (2011). Carnap and Kuhn: On the Relation Between the Logic of Science and the History of Science. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 42 (1):129 - 140.
    This paper offers a refutation of J. C. Pinto de Oliveira's recent critique of revisionist Carnap scholarship as giving undue weight to two brief letters to Kuhn expressing his interest in the latter's work. First an argument is provided to show that Carnap and Kuhn are by no means divided by a radical mismatch of their conceptions of the rationality of science as supposedly evidenced by their stance towards the distinction of the contexts of discovery and justification. This is (...)
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  14.  4
    Mark A. Winstanley (forthcoming). Genetic Epistemology, a Universalist Approach to the History of Science. Brill.
    _ Source: _Page Count 30 GER Lloyd discerns two conflicting hypotheses concerning human cognition: cross-cultural universality and cultural relativity. The history of science is one discipline among many actively contributing to our understanding of human cognition at present. Not surprisingly, then, the dichotomy is also present in the history of science. In contrast to current approaches to the history of science, which highlight cultural relativity, genetic epistemology, which is conceived by Jean Piaget as a (...)
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  15.  3
    Lindy A. Orthia (2016). What’s Wrong with Talking About the Scientific Revolution? Applying Lessons From History of Science to Applied Fields of Science Studies. Minerva 54 (3):353-373.
    Since the mid-twentieth century, the ‘Scientific Revolution’ has arguably occupied centre stage in most Westerners’, and many non-Westerners’, conceptions of science history. Yet among history of science specialists that position has been profoundly contested. Most radically, historians Andrew Cunningham and Perry Williams in 1993 proposed to demolish the prevailing ‘big picture’ which posited that the Scientific Revolution marked the origin of modern science. They proposed a new big picture in which science is seen as (...)
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  16.  5
    Joseph Needham, Dhruv Raina & S. Irfan Habib (eds.) (1999). Situating the History of Science: Dialogues with Joseph Needham. Oxford University Press.
    The essays in this volume place the history of science in context, especially the genre of history of science informed by Joseph Needham's ecumenical vision of science. The book presents a number of questions that relate to contemporary concerns of the history of sciences and multiculturalism.
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  17.  28
    B. I. B. Lindahl, Aant Elzinga & Alfred Welljams-Dorof (1998). Credit for Discoveries: Citation Data as a Basis for History of Science Analysis. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (6):609-620.
    Citation data have become an increasingly significant source of information for historians, sociologists, and other researchers studying the evolution of science. In the past few decades elaborate methodologies have been developed for the use of citation data in the study of the modern history of science. This article focuses on how citation indexes make it possible to trace the background and development of discoveries as well as to assess the credit that publishing scientists assign to particular discoverers. (...)
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  18.  4
    Alison E. Adam (1990). What Can the History of AI Learn From the History of Science? AI and Society 4 (3):232-241.
    There have been few attempts, so far, to document the history of artificial intelligence. It is argued that the “historical sociology of scientific knowledge” can provide a broad historiographical approach for the history of AI, particularly as it has proved fruitful within the history of science in recent years. The article shows how the sociology of knowledge can inform and enrich four types of project within the history of AI; organizational history; AI viewed as (...)
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  19.  20
    Lois Isenman (2009). Digestive Enzyme Secretion, Intuition, and the History of Science: Part II. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 14 (4):331-349.
    A companion paper explored the role of intuition in the genesis of an alternative theory for the secretion of pancreatic digestive enzymes, looking through the lens of three philosophers/historians of science. Gerald Holton, the last scholar, proposed that scientific imagination is shaped by a number of thematic presuppositions, which function largely below awareness. They come in pairs of opposites that alternately gain cultural preeminence. The current paper examines three thematic presuppositions inherent to both the generally accepted model for digestive (...)
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  20.  17
    Lois Isenman (2009). Trusting Your Gut, Among Other Things: Digestive Enzyme Secretion, Intuition, and the History of Science. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 14 (4):315-329.
    The role of intuition in scientific endeavor is examined through the lens of three philosophers/historians of science—Karl Popper, Thomas Kuhn, and Gerald Holton. All three attribute an important role to imagination/intuition in scientific endeavor. As a case study, the article examines the controversy between the generally accepted Vesicular Sequestration/Exocytosis Model of pancreatic digestive enzyme secretion and an alternative view called the Equilibrium Model. It highlights the intertwining of intuition and reason in the genesis of the Equilibrium Model developed in (...)
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  21.  9
    John H. Zammito (2011). History/Philosophy/Science: Some Lessons for Philosophy of History. History and Theory 50 (3):390-413.
    ABSTRACTRheinberger's brief history brings into sharp profile the importance of history of science for a philosophical understanding of historical practice. Rheinberger presents thought about the nature of science by leading scientists and their interpreters over the course of the twentieth century as emphasizing increasingly the local and developmental character of their learning practices, thus making the conception of knowledge dependent upon historical experience, “historicizing epistemology.” Linking his account of thought about science to his own work (...)
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  22. Thomas Mormann (2013). Topology as an Issue for History of Philosophy of Science. In Hanne Andersen, Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao J. Gonzalez, Thomas Uebel & Gregory Wheeler (eds.), New Challenges to Philosophy of Science. Springer 423--434.
    Since antiquity well into the beginnings of the 20th century geometry was a central topic for philosophy. Since then, however, most philosophers of science, if they took notice of topology at all, considered it as an abstruse subdiscipline of mathematics lacking philosophical interest. Here it is argued that this neglect of topology by philosophy may be conceived of as the sign of a conceptual sea-change in philosophy of science that expelled geometry, and, more generally, mathematics, from the central (...)
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  23.  23
    Peter Garik & Yann Benétreau-Dupin (2014). Report on a Boston University Conference December 7-8, 2012 on 'How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching?'. Science and Education 23 (9):1853-1873.
    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching? The presentations of the conference speakers and the reports of the working groups are reviewed. Multiple (...)
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  24. Michael R. Matthews (1994). Science Teaching: The Role of History and Philosophy of Science. Routledge.
    History, Philosophy and Science Teaching argues that science teaching and science teacher education can be improved if teachers know something of the history and philosophy of science and if these topics are included in the science curriculum. The history and philosophy of science have important roles in many of the theoretical issues that science educators need to address: the goals of science education; what constitutes an appropriate science curriculum (...)
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  25.  45
    Vincent C. Müller (2008). Margaret A. Boden, Mind as Machine: A History of Cognitive Science , 2 Vols. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 18 (1):121-125.
    Review of: Margaret A. Boden, Mind as Machine: A History of Cognitive Science, 2 vols, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006, xlvii+1631, cloth $225, ISBN 0-19-924144-9. - Mind as Machine is Margaret Boden’s opus magnum. For one thing, it comes in two massive volumes of nearly 1700 pages, ... But it is not just the opus magnum in simple terms of size, but also a truly crowning achievement of half a century’s career in cognitive science.
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  26. Catherine Kendig (2013). Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's Historia Insectorum Generalis and the Case of the Water Flea. Science and Education 22 (8):1939-1961.
    Hasok Chang (Science & Education 20:317–341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science education. In this paper I describe the implementation of an integrated learning project that I initiated, organized, and structured to complement a course in history and philosophy of (...)
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  27.  1
    Francesco Di Giacomo (2015). On Some Characteristics of Marcus’ Work in the Light of the History of Science. Foundations of Chemistry 17 (1):67-78.
    Professor Rudolph A. Marcus, recipient of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, is a distinguished theoretical chemist. Two important theories happen to bear his name: the Rice Ramsperger Kassel Marcus theory of unimolecular reactions and the Marcus theory of electron transfer reactions. When considering Marcus’ work, one finds characteristics of it that bear striking similarity to those that can be found in the work of some famous scientists. Such characteristics appear then as common recurring patterns in the work of theoreticians. (...)
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  28.  11
    Kostas Kampourakis & Ross H. Nehm (2014). History and Philosophy of Science and the Teaching of Evolution: Students’ Conceptions and Explanations. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer 377-399.
    A large body of work in science education indicates that evolution is one of the least understood and accepted scientific theories. Although scholarship from the history and philosophy of science (HPS) has shed light on many conceptual and pedagogical issues in evolution education, HPS-informed studies of evolution education are also characterized by conceptual weaknesses. In this chapter, we critically review such studies and find that some work lacks historically accurate characterizations of student ideas (preconceptions and misconceptions). In (...)
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  29.  12
    Mansoor Niaz (2014). Science Textbooks: The Role of History and Philosophy of Science. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer 1411-1441.
    Research in science education has recognized the importance of history and philosophy of science (HPS), and this has facilitated the evaluation of science textbooks. Purpose of this chapter is to review research based on analyses of science textbooks that explicitly use a history and philosophy of science framework. This review has focused on studies published in the 15-year period (1996–2010) and has drawn on the following major science education journals: International Journal of (...)
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  30.  58
    Michael R. Matthews (ed.) (2014). International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer.
    This inaugural handbook documents the distinctive research field that utilizes history and philosophy in investigation of theoretical, curricular and pedagogical issues in the teaching of science and mathematics. It is contributed to by 130 researchers from 30 countries; it provides a logically structured, fully referenced guide to the ways in which science and mathematics education is, informed by the history and philosophy of these disciplines, as well as by the philosophy of education more generally. The first (...)
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  31.  44
    Cassandra Pinnick & George Gale (2000). Philosophy of Science and History of Science: A Troubling Interaction. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 31 (1):109-125.
    History and philosophy complement and overlap each other in subject matter, but the two disciplines exhibit conflict over methodology. Since Hempel's challenge to historians that they should adopt the covering law model of explanation, the methodological conflict has revolved around the respective roles of the general and the particular in each discipline. In recent years, the revival of narrativism in history, coupled with the trend in philosophy of science to rely upon case studies, joins the methodological conflict (...)
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  32. Alan G. Soble (2003). The History of Sexual Anatomy and Self-Referential Philosophy of Science. Metaphilosophy 34 (3):229-249.
    This essay is a case study of the self-destruction that occurs in the work of a social-constructionist historian of science who embraces a radical philosophy of science. It focuses on Thomas Laqueur's Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud in arguing that a history of science committed to the social construction of science and to the central theses of Kuhnian, Duhemian, and Quinean philosophy of science is incoherent through self-reference. Laqueur's text (...)
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  33.  42
    Eric Schliesser (2011). Four Species of Reflexivity and History of Economics in Economic Policy Science. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):425-445.
    This paper argues that history of economics has a fruitful, underappreciated role to play in the development of economics, especially when understood as a policy science. This goes against the grain of the last half century during which economics, which has undergone a formal revolution, has distanced itself from its `literary' past and practices precisely with the aim to be a more successful policy science. The paper motivates the thesis by identifying and distinguishing four kinds of reflexivity (...)
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  34.  4
    Manfred Laubichler, Jane Maienschein & Jürgen Renn (2013). Computational Perspectives in the History of Science: To the Memory of Peter Damerow. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 104:119-130.
    Computational methods and perspectives can transform the history of science by enabling the pursuit of novel types of questions, dramatically expanding the scale of analysis , and offering novel forms of publication that greatly enhance access and transparency. This essay presents a brief summary of a computational research system for the history of science, discussing its implications for research, education, and publication practices and its connections to the open-access movement and similar transformations in the natural and (...)
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  35.  8
    Yuko Murakami & Manabu Sumida (2014). History and Philosophy of Science in Japanese Education: A Historical Overview. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer 2217-2245.
    This article describes the historical development of HPS/NOS mainly in higher education. Because the establishment of universities in Japan in late-nineteenth century was a reaction against Western imperialism, higher education aimed to cultivate scientists and engineers with an emphasis on practical applications. This direction in higher science and engineering education continues into the present. It has conditioned elementary and secondary education via university entrance examinations, where no questions on NOS appear. Hence, HPS research and education has developed in Japanese (...)
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  36.  5
    Peter Dear (2005). What Is the History of Science the History Of?: Early Modern Roots of the Ideology of Modern Science. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 96:390-406.
    The mismatch between common representations of “science” and the miscellany of materials typically studied by the historian of science is traced to a systematic ambiguity that may itself be traced to early modern Europe. In that cultural setting, natural philosophy came to be rearticulated as involving both contemplative and practical knowledge. The resulting tension and ambiguity are illustrated by the eighteenth‐century views of Buffon. In the nineteenth century, a new enterprise called “science” represents the establishment of an (...)
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  37.  1
    Steven Shapin (2005). Hyperprofessionalism and the Crisis of Readership in the History of Science. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 96:238-243.
    There is a crisis of readership for work in our field, as in many other academic disciplines. One of its causes is a pathological form of the professionalism that we so greatly value. “Hyperprofessionalism” is a disease whose symptoms include self‐referentiality, self‐absorption, and a narrowing of intellectual focus. This essay describes some features and consequences of hyperprofessionalism in the history of science and offers a modest suggestion for a possible cure.
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  38.  3
    Alan Richardson (2008). Scientific Philosophy as a Topic for History of Science. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 99:88-96.
    In lieu of a programmatic argument about the general relations of history of science and philosophy of science, this essay offers a particular topic in the history of philosophy of science that should be of interest to both historians and philosophers of science. It argues that questions typical of contemporary history of science could illuminate the recent history of philosophy of science and analytic philosophy. It also suggests that the (...) of scientific philosophy is a particularly fruitful arena for historians of science interested in issues of marginal science. (shrink)
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  39.  4
    Jane Maienschein, Manfred Laubichler & Andrea Loettgers (2008). How Can History of Science Matter to Scientists? Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 99:341-349.
    History of science has developed into a methodologically diverse discipline, adding greatly to our understanding of the interplay between science, society, and culture. Along the way, one original impetus for the then newly emerging discipline—what George Sarton called the perspective “from the point of view of the scientist”—dropped out of fashion. This essay shows, by means of several examples, that reclaiming this interaction between science and history of science yields interesting perspectives and new insights (...)
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  40.  1
    J. A. Bennett (1997). Museums and the Establishment of the History of Science at Oxford and Cambridge. British Journal for the History of Science 30 (1):29-46.
    In the Spring of 1944, an informal discussion took place in Cambridge between Mr. R. S. Whipple, Professor Allan Ferguson and Mr. F. H. C. Butler, concerning the formation of a national Society for the History of Science.This is the opening sentence of the inaugural issue of the Bulletin of the British Society for the History of Science, the Society's first official publication. Butler himself was the author of this outline account of the subsequent approach to (...)
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  41. Peter Bowler (2006). Experts and Publishers: Writing Popular Science in Early Twentieth-Century Britain, Writing Popular History of Science Now. British Journal for the History of Science 39 (2):159-187.
    The bulk of this address concerns itself with the extent to which professional scientists were involved in popular science writing in early twentieth-century Britain. Contrary to a widespread assumption, it is argued that a significant proportion of the scientific community engaged in writing the more educational type of popular science. Some high-profile figures acquired enough skill in popular writing to exert considerable influence over the public's perception of science and its significance. The address also shows how publishers (...)
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  42.  5
    Anna-K. Mayer (2004). Setting Up a Discipline, II: British History of Science and “the End of Ideology”, 1931–1948. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (1):41-72.
    For the history of science the 1940s were a transformative decade, when salient scholars like Herbert Butterfield or Alexandre Koyré set out to shape postwar culture by promoting new standards for understanding science. Some years ago I placed these developments in a tradition of enduring arts–science tensions and the contemporary notion that previous, “scientistic”, historical practices needed to be confronted with disinterested codes of historical craft . Here, I want to further explore the ideological dimensions of (...)
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  43.  8
    Anna-K. Mayer (2000). Setting Up a Discipline: Conflicting Agendas of the Cambridge History of Science Committee, 1936–1950. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 31 (4):665-689.
    Traditionally the domain of scientists, the history of science became an independent field of inquiry only in the twentieth century and mostly after the Second World War. This process of emancipation was accompanied by a historiographical departure from previous, ‘scientistic’ practices, a transformation often attributed to influences from sociology, philosophy and history. Similarly, the liberal humanists who controlled the Cambridge History of Science Committee after 1945 emphasized that their contribution lay in the special expertise they, (...)
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  44.  2
    Jane Maienschein & George Smith (2008). What Difference Does History of Science Make, Anyway? Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 99:318-321.
    This essay opens up the question of what difference the history of science makes. What is the value of the history of science, beyond its role as an academic pursuit that we historians of science know and love? It introduces the set of essays that follow as explorations that grew out of a seminar on this topic and that arise from the authors' particular concerns both that historians of science do not work hard enough (...)
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  45.  1
    Andrew Hamilton & Quentin Wheeler (2008). Taxonomy and Why History of Science Matters for Science. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 99:331-340.
    The history of science often has difficulty connecting with science at the lab-bench level, raising questions about the value of history of science for science. This essay offers a case study from taxonomy in which lessons learned about particular failings of numerical taxonomy in the second half of the twentieth century bear on the new movement toward DNA barcoding. In particular, it argues that an unwillingness to deal with messy theoretical questions in both cases (...)
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  46.  1
    David Kaiser (2005). Training and the Generalist’s Vision in the History of Science. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 96:244-251.
    Commentators have often complained about specialization in the history of science. This essay discusses recent intellectual trends within our discipline in the light of significant changes in graduate training: both a relatively recent consensus as to the types of sources that are appropriate to analyze in a dissertation and the tremendous growth in the number of new dissertations completed each year in our field. It suggests that this kind of focus on pedagogical concerns provides useful analytic tools for (...)
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  47.  7
    Steve Fuller (2014). Neuroscience, Neurohistory, and the History of Science: A Tale of Two Brain Images. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 105 (1):100-109.
    This essay introduces a Focus section on “Neurohistory and History of Science” by distinguishing images of the brain as governor and as transducer: the former treat the brain as the executive control center of the body, the latter as an interface between the organism and reality at large. Most of the consternation expressed in the symposium about the advent of neurohistory derives from the brain-as-governor conception, which is rooted in a “biologistic” understanding of humanity that in recent years (...)
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    Sujit Sivasundaram (2005). Towards a New History of Science and Religion. Metascience 14 (3):431-434.
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  49.  1
    A. Hall (1969). Can the History of Science Be History? British Journal for the History of Science 4 (3):207-220.
    It was in the closing year of the nineteenth century that Paul Tannery organized at an international historical congress the first international meeting devoted to the history of science. If antiquity would make a scholarly subject respectable, scholarship in the history of science must be beyond reproach; still earlier than Tannery and his colleagues in many European countries were the German historian of chemistry Kopp, and William Whewell, Master of Trinity; the eighteenth century had produced substantial (...)
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  50. Geoffrey Cantor (1997). Charles Singer and the Early Years of the British Society for the History of Science. British Journal for the History of Science 30 (1):5-23.
    Presidential addresses offer an opportunity to reflect on the history of our subject and where the history of science stands in our own day. Such reflections are particularly appropriate with the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the British Society for the History of Science which is marked in 1997. Some may consider that looking back over our past is either an unacceptable luxury or an occasion for the kind of celebration that can all too (...)
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