Search results for 'Ho Kwong Kwan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John P. Cragin, Y. K. Kwan & Y. N. Ho (1984). Social Ethics and the Emergence of Advertising in China: Perceptions From Within the Great Wall. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 3 (2):91 - 94.score: 2400.0
    While interest in doing business continues to rise steadily, information concerning the evolving social ethics of Chinese managers is sparse. This study reports the findings obtained from intensive interviews with thirty-nine Chinese advertising executives. In general, there appears to be developing a cautious optimism about the role of advertising in the Chinese economy. Findings are compared with earlier studies of American and Hong Kong managers and it is suggested that further research and observation is needed to track the development of (...)
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  2. Christian J. Resick, Gillian S. Martin, Mary A. Keating, Marcus W. Dickson, Ho Kwong Kwan & Chunyan Peng (2011). What Ethical Leadership Means to Me: Asian, American, and European Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 101 (3):435-457.score: 870.0
    Despite the increasingly multinational nature of the workplace, there have been few studies of the convergence and divergence in beliefs about ethics-based leadership across cultures. This study examines the meaning of ethical and unethical leadership held by managers in six societies with the goal of identifying areas of convergence and divergence across cultures. More specifically, qualitative research methods were used to identify the attributes and behaviors that managers from the People’s Republic of China (the PRC), Hong Kong, the Republic of (...)
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  3. Jinsong Li, Ho Kwan, Xiao-Yu Liu & Yi Liao (2015). Work–Family Effects of Ethical Leadership. Journal of Business Ethics 128 (3):535-545.score: 870.0
    This study examined the relationship between ethical leadership as perceived by employees and the family satisfaction of the employees’ spouses. It also considered the mediating role of the employees’ ethical leadership in the family domain as perceived by their spouses, and the moderating role of the employees’ identification with leader. The results, which were based on a sample of 193 employee–spouse dyads in China, indicated that employees’ perceptions of ethical leadership in the workplace positively influenced their spouses’ family satisfaction. Moreover, (...)
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  4. Long-Zeng Wu, Haina Zhang, Randy K. Chiu, Ho Kwong Kwan & Xiaogang He (2014). Hostile Attribution Bias and Negative Reciprocity Beliefs Exacerbate Incivility's Effects on Interpersonal Deviance. Journal of Business Ethics 120 (2):189-199.score: 870.0
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  5. Kwŏn-su Hŏ (ed.) (2007). Husan Hŏ Yu Ŭi Hangmun Kwa Sasang. Suri.score: 180.0
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  6. H. L. Ho (2008). A Philosophy of Evidence Law: Justice in the Search for Truth. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This book examines the legal and moral theory behind the law of evidence and proof, arguing that only by exploring the nature of responsibility in fact-finding can the role and purpose of much of the law be fully understood. Ho argues that the court must not only find the truth to do justice, it must do justice in finding the truth.
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  7. Mae-Wan Ho & Peter T. Saunders (1993). Rational Taxonomy and the Natural System. Acta Biotheoretica 41 (4):289-304.score: 60.0
    Since Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection, the idea of descent with modification came to dominate systematics, and so the study of morphology became subgugated to the reconstruction of phylogenies. Reinstating the organism in the theory of evolution (Ho & Saunders, 1979; Webster & Goodwin, 1982) leads to a project inrational taxonomy (Ho, 1986, 1988a), which attempts to classify biological forms on the basis of transformations on a given dynamical structure.Does rational taxonomy correspond to thenatural system that Linnaeus and (...)
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  8. Mae-Wan Ho (1998). On the Nature of Sustainable Economic Systems. World Futures 51 (3):199-221.score: 60.0
    A sustainable system has all the essential characteristics of an organism?an irreducible whole that develops, maintains and reproduces, or renews, itself by mobilizing material and energy captured from the environment. What is the nature of the material and energy mobilization that makes an organism? I begin with a brief description of a tentative theory of the organism?developed in detail elsewhere (Ho, 1993; 1994a; 1995a,b; 1996b,c)?as a dynamically and energetically closed domain of cyclic non?dissipative processes coupled to irreversible dissipative processes, which (...)
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  9. Ho-jin Yun (2006). Nammyŏng Ŭi In'gan Kwan'gye. Kyŏngin Munhwasa.score: 36.0
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  10. Kai-man Kwan (2006). Can Religious Experience Provide Justification for the Belief in God? The Debate in Contemporary Analytic Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 1 (6):640–661.score: 30.0
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  11. Donald Borrett, Sean D. Kelly & Hon Kwan (2000). Bridging Embodied Cognition and Brain Function: The Role of Phenomenology. Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):261-266.score: 30.0
    Both cognitive science and phenomenology accept the primacy of the organism-environment system and recognize that cognition should be understood in terms of an embodied agent situated in its environment. How embodiment is seen to shape our world, however, is fundamentally different in these two disciplines. Embodiment, as understood in cognitive science, reduces to a discussion of the consequences of having a body like ours interacting with our environment and the relationship is one of contingent causality. Embodiment, as understood phenomenologically, represents (...)
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  12. T. H. Ho (2014). Naturalism and the Space of Reasons in Mind and World. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (1):49-62.score: 30.0
    This paper aims to show that many criticisms of McDowell’s naturalism of second nature are based on what I call ‘the orthodox interpretation’ of McDowell’s naturalism. The orthodox interpretation is, however, a misinterpretation, which results from the fact that the phrase ‘the space of reasons’ is used equivocally by McDowell in Mind and World. Failing to distinguish two senses of ‘the space of reasons’, I argue that the orthodox interpretation renders McDowell’s naturalism inconsistent with McDowell’s Hegelian thesis that the conceptual (...)
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  13. Inmaculada de Melo-Martin & A. Ho (2008). Beyond Informed Consent: The Therapeutic Misconception and Trust. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):202-205.score: 30.0
    The therapeutic misconception has been seen as presenting an ethical problem because failure to distinguish the aims of research participation from those receiving ordinary treatment may seriously undermine the informed consent of research subjects. Hence, most theoretical and empirical work on the problems of the therapeutic misconception has been directed to evaluate whether, and to what degree, this confusion invalidates the consent of subjects. We argue here that this focus on the understanding component of informed consent, while important, might be (...)
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  14. Chien-Hsing Ho (2014). Meaning, Understanding, and Knowing-What: An Indian Grammarian Notion of Intuition (Pratibha). Philosophy East and West 64 (2):404-424.score: 30.0
    For Bhartrhari, a fifth-century Indian grammarian-philosopher, all conscious beings—beasts, birds and humans—are capable of what he called pratibha, a flash of indescribable intuitive understanding such that one knows what the present object “means” and what to do with it. Such an understanding, if correct, amounts to a mode of knowing that may best be termed knowing-what, to distinguish it from both knowing-that and knowing-how. This paper attempts to expound Bhartrhari’s conception of pratibha in relation to the notions of meaning, understanding, (...)
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  15. Karen Ho (2001). Bacteriophage Therapy for Bacterial Infections: Rekindling a Memory From the Pre-Antibiotics Era. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 44 (1):1-16.score: 30.0
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  16. Dien Ho & Bradley Monton (2005). Anthropic Reasoning Does Not Conflict with Observation. Analysis 65 (285):42–45.score: 30.0
  17. Dien Ho & Monton Bradley (2005). Anthropic Reasoning Does Not Conflict with Observation. Analysis 65 (1):42 - 45.score: 30.0
    (I) For every x, for every index kind k, for every index i1 of kind k, for every index i2 of kind k, Fx at i1 at i2 if and only if Fx at i1.
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  18. Chien-Hsing Ho (2010). Nāgārjuna's Critique of Language. Asian Philosophy 20 (2):159-174.score: 30.0
    This essay attempts to provide a systematic reconstruction of Nāgārjuna's philosophical thought by understanding it as a critique of the attachment to linguistic expressions and their referents. We first present an outline of Nāgārjuna's philosophy, centering on such notions as 'dependent origination', 'emptiness' and 'self-nature'. Then we discuss Nāgārjuna's dismissal of a metaphysical use of language, particularly his contention that language can function well without assuming the reality of its referents. We also consider his statement that he has no assertion (...)
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  19. Donald Borrett, Sean D. Kelly & Hon Kwan (2000). Phenomenology, Dynamical Neural Networks and Brain Function. Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):213-228.score: 30.0
    Current cognitive science models of perception and action assume that the objects that we move toward and perceive are represented as determinate in our experience of them. A proper phenomenology of perception and action, however, shows that we experience objects indeterminately when we are perceiving them or moving toward them. This indeterminacy, as it relates to simple movement and perception, is captured in the proposed phenomenologically based recurrent network models of brain function. These models provide a possible foundation from which (...)
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  20. Chien-Hsing Ho (2014). The Way of Nonacquisition: Jizang's Philosophy of Ontic Indeterminacy. Hamburg University Press.score: 30.0
    For Jizang (549−623), a prominent philosophical exponent of Chinese Madhyamaka, all things are empty of determinate form or nature. Given anything X, no linguistic item can truly and conclusively be applied to X in the sense of positing a determinate form or nature therein. This philosophy of ontic indeterminacy is connected closely with his notion of the Way (dao), which seems to indicate a kind of ineffable principle of reality. However, Jizang also equates the Way with nonacquisition as a conscious (...)
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  21. David Y. F. Ho (1995). Selfhood and Identity in Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and Hinduism: Contrasts with the West. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 25 (2):115–139.score: 30.0
  22. Jo Ann Ho (2010). Ethical Perception: Are Differences Between Ethnic Groups Situation Dependent? Business Ethics 19 (2):154-182.score: 30.0
    This study was conducted to determine how culture influences the ethical perception of managers. Most studies conducted so far have only stated similarities and differences in ethical perception between cultural or ethnic groups and little attention has been paid towards understanding how cultural values influence the ethnic groups' ethical perception. Moreover, most empirical research in this area has focused on moral judgement, moral decision making and action, with limited empirical work in the area of ethical perception. A total of 22 (...)
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  23. Tsung-Hsing Ho (2013). Kant and McDowell on Skepticism and Disjunctivism. In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltburgerlicher Absicht: Akten Des XI. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter 761-770.score: 30.0
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  24. Yi-Hui Ho (2011). Determinants of Green Practice Adoption for Logistics Companies in China. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):67 - 83.score: 30.0
    This article aims to analyze the factors influencing the adoption of green practices in Chinese logistics industry. The determinant factors are composed of technological, organizational, and environmental dimensions. A questionnaire survey on the green practice adoption of Chinese logistics companies was conducted, and 322 samples were analyzed. Research results reveal that relative advantage and compatibility of green practices, organizational support, quality of human resources, regulatory pressure, and governmental support have significantly positive influences on the adoption of green practices for Chinese (...)
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  25. Jack M. C. Kwong (2011). Resisting Aliefs: Gendler on Belief-Discordant Behaviors. Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):77 - 91.score: 30.0
    This paper challenges T. S. Gendler's notion of aliefs, a novel kind of mental state which she introduces to explain a wide variety of belief-discordant behaviors. In particular, I argue that many of the cases which she uses to motivate such a mental state can be fully explained by accounts that make use only of commonplace attitudes such as beliefs and desires.
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  26. Chien-Hsing Ho (2007). Consciousness and Self-Awareness. Asian Philosophy 17 (3):213 – 230.score: 30.0
    In this paper I propose to inquire into the theory of self-awareness propounded by the two Buddhist epistemologists, Dignaga and Dharmakirti. I first give an outline of the Buddhist notion of consciousness, then deal with the notion of objectual appearance, and finally dwell on the theory itself together with certain arguments in its favor. It is shown that the Buddhists subscribed themselves to the following self-awareness thesis: that our waking consciousness is always pre-reflectively and nonconceptually aware of itself. Adopting an (...)
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  27. Jack M. C. Kwong (2007). Is Conceptual Atomism a Plausible Theory of Concepts? Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (3):413-434.score: 30.0
    Conceptual atomism is the view according to which most lexical concepts lack ‘internal’ or constituent structure. To date, it has not received much attention from philosophers and psychologists. A centralreason is that it is thought to be an implausible theory of concepts, resulting in untenable implications. The main objective of this paper is to present conceptual atomism as a viable alternative, with a view toachieving two aims: the first, to characterize and to elucidate conceptual atomism; and the second, to dispel (...)
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  28. M. W. Ho (1997). Quantum Coherence and Conscious Experience. Kybernetes 26:265-76.score: 30.0
  29. Jack M. C. Kwong (2006). Why Concepts Can't Be Theories. Philosophical Explorations 9 (3):309-325.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I present an alternative argument for Jerry Fodor's recent conclusion that there are currently no tenable theories of concepts in the cognitive sciences and in the philosophy of mind. Briefly, my approach focuses on the 'theory-theory' of concepts. I argue that the two ways in which cognitive psychologists have formulated this theory lead to serious difficulties, and that there cannot be, in principle, a third way in which it can be reformulated. Insofar as the 'theory-theory' is supposed (...)
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  30. Chien-Hsing Ho (2008). The Finger Pointing Toward the Moon: A Philosophical Analysis of the Chinese Buddhist Thought of Reference. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):159-177.score: 30.0
    In this essay I attempt a philosophical analysis of the Chinese Buddhist thought of linguistic reference to shed light on how the Buddhist understands the way language refers to an ineffable reality. For this purpose, the essay proceeds in two directions: an enquiry into the linguistic thoughts of Sengzhao (374-414 CE) and Jizang (549-623 CE), two leading Chinese Madhyamika thinkers, and an analysis of the Buddhist simile of a moon-pointing finger. The two approaches respectively constitute the horizontal and vertical axes (...)
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  31. Chien-Hsing Ho (2006). Saying the Unsayable. Philosophy East and West 56 (3):409-427.score: 30.0
    A number of traditional philosophers and religious thinkers advocated an ineffability thesis to the effect that the ultimate reality cannot be expressed as it truly is by human concepts and words. However, if X is ineffable, the question arises as to how words can be used to gesture toward it. We can't even say that X is unsayable, because in doing so, we would have made it sayable. In this article, I examine the solution offered by the fifth-century Indian grammarian-philosopher (...)
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  32. Anita Ho (2008). The Individualist Model of Autonomy and the Challenge of Disability. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):193-207.score: 30.0
    In recent decades, the intertwining ideas of self-determination and well-being have received tremendous support in bioethics. Discussions regarding self-determination, or autonomy, often focus on two dimensions—the capacity of the patient and the freedom from external coercion. The practice of obtaining informed consent, for example, has become a standard procedure in therapeutic and research medicine. On the surface, it appears that patients now have more opportunities to exercise their self-determination than ever. Nonetheless, discussions of patient autonomy in the bioethics literature, which (...)
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  33. Md Zabid Abdul Rashid & Jo Ann Ho (2003). Perceptions of Business Ethics in a Multicultural Community: The Case of Malaysia. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):75 - 87.score: 30.0
    Leaders and managers of today''s multinational corporations face a plethora of problems and issues directly attributable to the fact that they are operating in an international context. With work-sites, plants and/or customers based in another country, or even several countries, representing a vast spectrum of cultural differences, international trade and offshore operations, coupled with increased globalisation in respect to political, social and economic realities, contribute to new dilemmas that these leaders must deal with. Not the least of these being a (...)
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  34. Chien-Hsing Ho (2012). One Name, Infinite Meanings: Jizang's Thought on Meaning and Reference. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (3):436-452.score: 30.0
    Jizang sets forth a hermeneutical theory of “one name, infinite meanings” that proposes four types of interpretation of word meaning to the effect that a nominal word X means X, non-X, the negation of X, and all things whatsoever. In this article, I offer an analysis of the theory, with a view to elucidating Jizang's thought on meaning and reference and considering its contemporary significance. The theory, I argue, may best be viewed as an expedient means for telling us how (...)
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  35. Dien Ho (2008). When Good Organs Go to Bad People. Bioethics 22 (2):77-83.score: 30.0
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  36. Vincent K. Y. Ho (2011). Medicine, Methodology, and Values Trade-Offs in Clinical Science and Practice. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (2):243-255.score: 30.0
    In recent years, society has come to recognize that the work performed by scientists, like that of journalists and politicians, may be influenced by the interests they serve. As a result, scientists' research is increasingly contested as a source of reliable knowledge. Such has been the case in issues concerning the climate debate, for example, where research results are at times perceived to comfortably fit in with the viewpoints of interested parties outside science. In medicine, governmental as well as commercial (...)
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  37. Brenda Ray, Colin Jackson, Elizabeth Ducat, Ann Ho, Sara Hamon & Mary Jeanne Kreek (2011). Effect of Ethnicity, Gender and Drug Use History on Achieving High Rates of Affirmative Informed Consent for Genetics Research: Impact of Sharing with a National Repository. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (6):374-379.score: 30.0
    Aim Genetic research representative of the population is crucial to understanding the underlying causes of many diseases. In a prospective evaluation of informed consent we assessed the willingness of individuals of different ethnicities, gender and drug dependence history to participate in genetic studies in which their genetic sample could be shared with a repository at the National Institutes of Health. Methods Potential subjects were recruited from the general population through the use of flyers and referrals from previous participants and clinicians (...)
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  38. Foo Nin Ho, Hui-Ming Deanna Wang & Scott J. Vitell (2012). A Global Analysis of Corporate Social Performance: The Effects of Cultural and Geographic Environments. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 107 (4):423-433.score: 30.0
    As more and more multi-national companies expand their operations globally, their responsibilities extend beyond not only the economic motive of profitability but also other social and environmental factors. The objective of this article is to examine the impact of national culture and geographic environment on firms’ corporate social performance (CSP). Empirical tests are based on a global CSP database of companies from 49 countries. Results show that the Hofstede’s cultural dimensions are significantly associated with CSP. In addition, European companies are (...)
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  39. Chien-Hsing Ho (2014). Emptiness as Subject-Object Unity: Sengzhao on the Way Things Truly Are. Routledge.score: 30.0
    Sengzhao (374?−414 CE), a leading Chinese Mādhyamika philosopher, holds that the myriad things are empty, and that they are, at bottom, the same as emptiness qua the way things truly are. In this paper, I distinguish the level of the myriad things from that of the way things truly are and call them, respectively, the ontic and the ontological levels. For Sengzhao, the myriad things at the ontic level are indeterminate and empty, and he equates the way things truly are (...)
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  40. George Tomko, Donald Borrett, Hon Kwan & Greg Steffan (2010). SmartData: Make the Data “Think” for Itself. [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 3 (2):343-362.score: 30.0
    SmartData is a research program to develop web-based intelligent agents that will perform two tasks: securely store an individual’s personal and/or proprietary data, and protect the privacy and security of the data by only disclosing it in accordance with instructions authorized by the data subject. The vision consists of a web-based SmartData agent that would serve as an individual’s proxy in cyberspace to protect their personal or proprietary data. The SmartData agent (which ‘houses’ the data and its permitted uses) would (...)
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  41. Scott J. Vitell & Foo Nin Ho (1997). Ethical Decision Making in Marketing: A Synthesis and Evaluation of Scales Measuring the Various Components of Decision Making in Ethical Situations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (7):699-717.score: 30.0
    The authors present a comprehensive synthesis and evaluation of the published scales measuring the components of the decision making process in ethical situations using the Hunt-Vitell (1993) theory of ethics as a framework to guide the research. Suggestions for future scale development are also provided.
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  42. Chien-Hsing Ho (2012). The Nonduality of Speech and Silence: A Comparative Analysis of Jizang’s Thought on Language and Beyond. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):1-19.score: 30.0
    Jizang (549−623 CE), the key philosophical exponent of the Sanlun tradition of Chinese Buddhism, based his philosophy considerably on his reading of the works of Nāgārjuna (c.150−250 CE), the founder of the Indian Madhyamaka school. However, although Jizang sought to follow Nāgārjuna closely, there are salient features in his thought on language that are notably absent from Nāgārjuna’s works. In this paper, I present a philosophical analysis of Jizang’s views of the relationship between speech and silence and compare them with (...)
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  43. Cornelius R. Pawlak, Britta D. Karrenbauer, Peggy Schneider & Ying-Jui Ho (2012). The Elevated Plus-Maze Test: Differential Psychopharmacology of Anxiety-Related Behavior. Emotion Review 4 (1):98-115.score: 30.0
    The role of individual factors in behavioral neuroscience is an important, but still neglected, area of research. For example, the Elevated Plus-Maze Test has been one of the most used paradigms to gauge unconditioned aversively motivated behavior in rodents. However, despite a great number of experiments with this test there have been only few efforts to assess systematic individual variations in the elevated plus-maze and related neurobiological functions. The present review aims to give, first, a general overview and introduction about (...)
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  44. D. Christopher Ralston & Justin Ho (2007). Disability, Humanity, and Personhood: A Survey of Moral Concepts. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (6):619 – 633.score: 30.0
    Three of the articles included in this issue of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy - Ron Amundson and Shari Tresky's "On a Bioethical Challenge to Disability Rights"; Rachel Cooper's "Can It Be a Good Thing to Be Deaf?"; and Mark T. Brown's "The Potential of the Human Embryo" - interact (in various ways) with the concepts of disability, humanity, and personhood and their normative dimensions. As one peruses these articles, it becomes apparent that terms like "disability," "human being," and (...)
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  45. Hock Ho (2011). Paul Roberts and Adrian Zuckerman: Criminal Evidence. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (2):225-229.score: 30.0
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  46. Tze-wan Kwan (2007). Towards a Phenomenology of Pronouns. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (2):247 – 268.score: 30.0
    For most people, pronouns are just a matter for linguists. In linguistics, pronouns are classified according to the various linguistic functions they perform: for instance, deictic or anaphoric, definite or indefinite, personal or demonstrative, etc. But a closer look at the issue reveals that pronouns have a great deal to do with philosophy as well. This paper presents a brief sketch of some classical philosophical problems to show how dealing with pronouns has played a part in the formulation and advancement (...)
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  47. Gabriel D. Donleavy, Kit-Chun Joanna Lam & Simon S. M. Ho (2008). Does East Meet West in Business Ethics: An Introduction to the Special Issue. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 79 (1/2):1 - 8.score: 30.0
    This article introduces and summarizes selected papers from the first World Business Ethics Forum held in Hong Kong and Macau in November 2006, co-hosted by the Hong Kong Baptist University and by the University of Macau. Business Ethics in the East remain distinct from those in the West, but the distinctions are becoming less pronounced and the ethical traffic flows both ways.
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  48. Dien Ho (2010). Providing Optimal Care With Dirty Hands. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):16-17.score: 30.0
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  49. Dien Ho (2013). What's So Bad About Being a Zombie. Philosophy Now 96 (96):8-11.score: 30.0
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  50. Alistair Kwan (2011). Tycho's Talisman: Astrological Magic in the Design of Uraniborg. Early Science and Medicine 16 (2):95-119.score: 30.0
    Renaissance Vitruvianism provides a broad context in which to situate the architecture of Tycho Brahe’s Uraniborg, but fails to account for the motivation behind Tycho’s design, for how Tycho knew Vitruvian design principles, and for any of Uraniborg’s specific features. Identifying Uraniborg as a Palladian design fares even worse. Some of Uraniborg’s features can, however, be understood in terms of talismanic ideas such as those circulating in sources such as Agrippa’s De occulta philosophia (which Tycho possessed) and Dee’s Propaedeumata aphoristica. (...)
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