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Holly Teetzel [3]Holly D. Teetzel [1]
  1. Lawrence J. Schneiderman, Todd Gilmer, Holly D. Teetzel, Daniel O. Dugan, Paula Goodman-Crews & Felicia Cohn (2005). Dissatisfaction with Ethics Consultations: The Anna Karenina Principle. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (01):101-106.
    In a previously published multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled trial of more than 500 intensive care unit patients involved in conflicts over treatment decisions, ethics consultations were found to be helpful in resolving the conflicts and reducing nonbeneficial treatments. The intervention received favorable reviews by 80% of patient surrogates and more than 90% of physicians and nurses. Nevertheless, several participants in the ethics consultation process expressed dissatisfactions with the intervention. In this paper, we report our efforts to determine the factors associated (...)
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  2. Lawrence J. Schneiderman, Holly Teetzel & Todd Gilmer (2003). Response to “Reading Futility: Reflections on a Bioethical Concept” by Donald Joralemon (CQ Vol 11, No 2), The Rise and Fall of Death: The Plateau of Futility. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (03):308-309.
    Researchers tracking social trends have discovered a remarkable labor-saving device called the computer. They sit down before the instrument, call up a search engine, enter a key word that they believe represents the trend, and count the number of articles aroused by that key word. They track these numbers over a period of time and even graph them. Those who dislike a certain concept are happy to report the concept's rise and fall. Such has occurred with two articles, one of (...)
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  3. Lawrence J. Schneiderman, Robert M. Kaplan, Esther Rosenberg & Holly Teetzel (1997). Do Physicians' Own Preferences for Life-Sustaining Treatment Influence Their Perceptions of Patients' Preferences? A Second Look. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (2):131-.
    Previous studies have documented the fallibility of attempts by surrogates and physicians to act in a substituted judgment capacity and predict end-of-life treatment decisions on behalf of patients. We previously reported that physicians misperceive their patients' preferences and substitute their own preferences for those of their patients with respect to four treatments: cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the event of cardiac arrest, ventilator for an indefinite period of time, medical nutrition and hydration for an indefinite period of time, and hospitalization in the (...)
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  4. Lawrence J. Schneiderman, Robert M. Kaplan, Robert A. Pearlman & Holly Teetzel (1993). Do Physicians' Own Preferences for Life-Sustaining Treatment Influence Their Perceptions of Patients' Preferences? Journal of Clinical Ethics 4 (1):28.
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