Search results for 'Homonyms' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Donald H. Kausler & Richard D. Olson (1969). Homonyms as Items in Verbal Discrimination Learning and Transfer. Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (1p1):136.score: 15.0
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  2. Donald Keller & Murray Glanzer (1969). Recognition of Words and Homonyms as a Function of Amount of Preexposure. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (1):160.score: 15.0
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  3. Leah L. Light (1972). Homonyms and Synonyms as Retrieval Cues. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (2):255.score: 15.0
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  4. Jurgis Brakas (2011). Aristotle's "is Said in Many Ways" and its Relationship to His Homonyms. Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (2):135-159.score: 9.0
    Being, Aristotle tells us, "is said in many ways" . So are the good and many other fundamental things. Fair enough, but what on earth does this mean? What, to narrow the focus to the basic question, does Aristotle mean by in phrases such as and other constructions where is used in the same sense? While scholars have presented us with an array of different translations for this difficult term, not all of them are compatible and none seem adequate. Yet (...)
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  5. Doris Eckstein, Matthias Kubat & Walter J. Perrig (2011). Visible Homonyms Are Ambiguous, Subliminal Homonyms Are Not: A Close Look at Priming. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1327-1343.score: 9.0
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  6. K. L. Flannery (1999). The Synonymy of Homonyms. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 81 (3):268-289.score: 9.0
     
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  7. Daniel Mirman, Ted J. Strauss, James A. Dixon & James S. Magnuson (2010). Effect of Representational Distance Between Meanings on Recognition of Ambiguous Spoken Words. Cognitive Science 34 (1):161-173.score: 6.0
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  8. Peter A. Ornstein & Wilma A. Winnick (1968). Influence of Set in Tachistoscopic Threshold Determination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (3p1):504.score: 6.0
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  9. Julie K. Ward (2008). Aristotle on Homonymy: Dialectic and Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 6.0
    In this book, Julie K. Ward examines Aristotle's thought regarding how language informs our views of what is real. First she places Aristotle's theory in its historical and philosophical contexts in relation to Plato and Speusippus. Ward then explores Aristotle's theory of language as it is deployed in several works, including Ethics, Topics, Physics, and Metaphysics, so as to consider its relation to dialectical practice and scientific explanation as Aristotle conceived it.
     
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  10. J. A. Gengerelli (1948). Apparent Movement in Relation to Homonymous and Heteronymous Stimulation of the Cerebral Hemispheres. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (5):592.score: 5.0
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  11. Rodrigo Becerra (2004). Homonymous Mistakes with Ontological Aspirations: The Persisting Problem with the Word 'Consciousness'. Sorites 15 (December):11-23.score: 3.0
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  12. Nathanael Stein (2011). Aristotle's Causal Pluralism. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 93 (2):121-147.score: 3.0
    Central to Aristotle's metaphysics and epistemology is the claim that ‘ aitia ’ – ‘cause’ – is “said in many ways”, i.e., multivocal. Though the importance of the four causes in Aristotle's system cannot be overstated, the nature of his pluralism about aitiai has not been addressed. It is not at all obvious how these modes of causation are related to one another, or why they all deserve a common term. Nor is it clear, in particular, whether the causes are (...)
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  13. Allan F. Hanson (2004). From Classification to Indexing: How Automation Transforms the Way We Think. Social Epistemology 18 (4):333 – 356.score: 3.0
    To classify is to organize the particulars in a body of information according to some meaningful scheme. Difficulty recognizing metaphor, synonyms and homonyms, and levels of generalization renders those applications of artificial intelligence that are currently in widespread use at a loss to deal effectively with classification. Indexing conveys nothing about relationships; it pinpoints information on particular topics without reference to anything else. Keyword searching is a form of indexing, and here artificial intelligence excels. Growing reliance on automated means (...)
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  14. Alberto Voltolini, Indexinames.score: 3.0
    Insofar as the so-called new theory of reference has come to be acknowleged as the leading theoretical paradigm in semantic research, it has been widely accepted that proper names directly refer to their designation. In advancing some of the most convincing arguments in favour of this view of names, S. Kripke has however left somehow undecided what the role of context is in determining which is the direct referent for a name. According to one interpretation of his thought, context has (...)
     
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  15. Julie K. Ward (2008). Is Human a Homonym for Aristotle? Apeiron 41 (3):75-98.score: 3.0
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  16. Otmar Meienberg (1983). How Can Striate Vision Contribute to the Detection of Objects Within a Homonymous Visual Field Defect? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):455.score: 3.0
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  17. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). Genealogy Revisited. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy.score: 1.0
    “Another Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morality?” one might be excused for asking at the sight of Simon May’s new collection. This volume has to contend for shelf space with homonymic monographs by Lawrence Hatab (2008) and David Owen (2007), as well as Daniel Conway’s (2008) Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals, a compilation of the same name edited by Christa Acampora (2006), and Brian Leiter’s Nietzsche on Morality (2002). Add to this that Hatab contributes to May’s collection, Owen and (...)
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  18. Christopher Shields (2012). The Dialectic of Life. Synthese 185 (1):103-124.score: 1.0
    In the dialectic of debates about the extension of life, one witnesses a predictably repeating pattern: one side appeals to a motley of variegated criteria for something’s qualifying as a living system, only to find an opposite side taking issue with the individual necessity or collective sufficiency of the proposed criteria. Some of these criteria tend to cluster with one another, while others do not: metabolism, growth and reproduction; self-organization and homeostasis; an ability to decrease internal entropy by the appropriation (...)
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  19. Robert L. Gallagher (2011). Aristotle on Eidei Diapherontoi. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (3):363 - 384.score: 1.0
    Aristotle holds that there must be multiple forms of human being and those forms constitute a genos, this paper argues. Aristotle advances his claim by arguing that the strength of a polis rests on the existence of a spectrum of useful essential differences among its citizens. The paper rejects the notion that eîdos is a homonym, and argues that it signifies `form,' not `species.' Its theses are based on analysis of passages in the Ethics, Metaphysics, Politics and other works. The (...)
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  20. Noam Chomsky (1953). Systems of Syntactic Analysis. Journal of Symbolic Logic 18 (3):242-256.score: 1.0
    During the past several decades, linguists have developed and applied widely techniques which enable them, to a considerable extent, to determine and state the structure of natural languages without semantic reference. It is of interest to inquire seriously into the formality of linguistic method and the adequacy of whatever part of it can be made purely formal, and to examine the possibilities of applying it, as has occasionally been suggested,s to a wider range of problems. In order to pursue these (...)
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  21. Dominique Raynaud (2003). Ibn Al-Haytham on Binocular Vision: A Precursor of Physiological Optics. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (1):79-99.score: 1.0
    The modern physiological optics introduces the notions related to the conditions of fusion of binocular images by the concept of correspondence, due to Christiaan Huygens (1704), and by an experiment attributed to Christoph Scheiner (1619). The conceptualization of this experiment dates, in fact, back to Ptolemy (90-168) and Ibn al-Haytham (d. after 1040). The present paper surveys Ibn al-Haytham's knowledge about the mechanisms of binocular vision. The article subsequently explains why Ibn al-Haytham, a mathematician, but here an experimenter, did not (...)
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  22. Dominique Raynaud (2003). Ibn al-Haytham sur la vision binoculaire: un précurseur de l'optique physiologique. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (1):79-99.score: 1.0
    L'optique physiologique moderne introduit les notions relatives aux conditions de fusion des images binoculaires par le concept de correspondance, prêté à Christiaan Huygens (1704), et par une expérience attribuée à Christoph Scheiner (1619). L'article montre que la conceptualisation de l'expérience remonte en fait à Ptolémée (90-168) et à Ibn al-Haytham (m. ap. 1040), et précise les connaissances que ce dernier avait des mécanismes de la vision binoculaire. Il est ensuite expliqué pourquoi Ibn al-Haytham, mathématicien mais ici expérimentateur, ne donne pas (...)
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  23. Anne-Lise Rey (2008). Autour de l'Oedipus chymicus. Chimie, méthode et substance leibniziennes. Methodos 8.score: 1.0
    À partir de la comparaison entre l’Oedipus chymicus de Leibniz écrit en 1710 et ce qui nous a semblé un possible référent, le texte homonyme de J.J Becher de 1664, l’article s’efforce de déterminer les raisons de l’attrait que Leibniz éprouve pour la chimie de son temps. Si les pratiques de codage et de décodage de la démarche alchimique ainsi que l’attention portée aux transformations des états de la matière constituent indéniablement des points de convergence avec la philosophie leibnizienne, il (...)
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  24. C. F. Sambo, G. Vallar, P. Fortis, R. Ronchi, L. Posteraro, B. Forster & A. Maravita (2011). Visual and Spatial Modulation of Tactile Extinction: Behavioural and Electrophysiological Evidence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:217-217.score: 1.0
    Crossing the hands over the midline reduces left tactile extinction to double simultaneous stimulation in right-brain-damaged patients, suggesting that spatial-attentional biases towards the ipsilesional (right) side of space contribute to the patients’ contralesional (left) deficit. We investigated (1) whether the position of the left hand, and its vision, affected processing speed of tactile stimuli, and (2) the electrophysiological underpinnings of the effect of hand position. (1) Four right-brain-damaged patients with spatial neglect and contralesional left tactile extinction or somatosensory deficits, and (...)
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  25. M. Zouhar (2003). Frege a Wittgenstein o Logicky Dokonalom Jazyku. Filozofia 58 (6):363-382.score: 1.0
    A logically perfect language must meet following requirements: (i) it must not contain „empty“ expressions designating nothing and (ii) it must not involve phrases that are synonymous, homonymous etc. According to Frege, the meaning of a compound expression is a function of meanings of its components, i.e. the meaning of an expression consisting of a functional phrase and a name is the value of the function for the argument. However, for some arguments a function need not give values and, hence, (...)
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