Search results for 'Homonyms' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    Leah L. Light (1972). Homonyms and Synonyms as Retrieval Cues. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (2):255.
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  2. Donald H. Kausler & Richard D. Olson (1969). Homonyms as Items in Verbal Discrimination Learning and Transfer. Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (1p1):136.
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  3.  1
    Donald Keller & Murray Glanzer (1969). Recognition of Words and Homonyms as a Function of Amount of Preexposure. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (1):160.
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  4.  8
    Doris Eckstein, Matthias Kubat & Walter J. Perrig (2011). Visible Homonyms Are Ambiguous, Subliminal Homonyms Are Not: A Close Look at Priming. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1327-1343.
    Homonyms, i.e. ambiguous words like ‘score’, have different meanings in different contexts. Previous research indicates that all potential meanings of a homonym are first accessed in parallel before one of the meanings is selected in a competitive race. If these processes are automatic, these processes of selection should even be observed when homonyms are shown subliminally. This study measured the time course of subliminal and supraliminal priming by homonyms with a frequent and a rare meaning in a (...)
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  5.  37
    Jurgis Brakas (2011). Aristotle's "is Said in Many Ways" and its Relationship to His Homonyms. Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (2):135-159.
    Being, Aristotle tells us, "is said in many ways ". So are the good and many other fundamental things. Fair enough, but what on earth does this mean? What, to narrow the focus to the basic question, does Aristotle mean by in phrases such as and other constructions where is used in the same sense? While scholars have presented us with an array of different translations for this difficult term, not all of them are compatible and none seem adequate. Yet (...)
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  6.  2
    K. L. Flannery (1999). The Synonymy of Homonyms. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 81 (3):268-289.
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    Jaap van Brakel & M. A. Lin (2015). Extension of Family Resemblance Concepts as a Necessary Condition of Interpretation Across Traditions. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (4):475-497.
    In this paper we extend Wittgenstein’s notion of family resemblance to translation, interpretation, and comparison across traditions. There is no need for universals. This holds for everyday concepts such as green and qing 青, philosophical concepts such as emotion and qing 情, as well as philosophical categories such as form of life and dao 道. These notions as well as all other concepts from whatever tradition are family resemblance concepts. We introduce the notion of quasi-universal, which connects family resemblance concepts (...)
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  8. Julie K. Ward (2008). Aristotle on Homonymy: Dialectic and Science. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, Julie K. Ward examines Aristotle's thought regarding how language informs our views of what is real. First she places Aristotle's theory in its historical and philosophical contexts in relation to Plato and Speusippus. Ward then explores Aristotle's theory of language as it is deployed in several works, including Ethics, Topics, Physics, and Metaphysics, so as to consider its relation to dialectical practice and scientific explanation as Aristotle conceived it.
     
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  9.  9
    Daniel Mirman, Ted J. Strauss, James A. Dixon & James S. Magnuson (2010). Effect of Representational Distance Between Meanings on Recognition of Ambiguous Spoken Words. Cognitive Science 34 (1):161-173.
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  10. Peter A. Ornstein & Wilma A. Winnick (1968). Influence of Set in Tachistoscopic Threshold Determination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (3p1):504.
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  11.  48
    John Corcoran (2015). Aristotle’s Semiotic Triangles and Pyramids. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 21 (1):198-9.
    Imagine an equilateral triangle “pointing upward”—its horizontal base under its apex angle. A semiotic triangle has the following three “vertexes”: (apex) an expression, (lower-left) one of the expression’s conceptual meanings or senses, and (lower-right) the referent or denotation determined by the sense [1, pp. 88ff]. One example: the eight-letter string ‘coleslaw’ (apex), the concept “coleslaw” (lower-left), and the salad coleslaw (lower-right) [1, p. 84f]. Using Church’s terminology [2, pp. 6, 41]—modifying Frege’s—the word ‘coleslaw’ expresses the concept “coleslaw”, the word ‘coleslaw’ (...)
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  12. Alberto Voltolini (1995). Indexinames. In J. Hill & P. Kot'attko (eds.), Karlovy Vary Studies in Reference and Meaning. Filosofia 258-285.
    Insofar as the so-called new theory of reference has come to be acknowleged as the leading theoretical paradigm in semantic research, it has been widely accepted that proper names directly refer to their designation. In advancing some of the most convincing arguments in favour of this view of names, S. Kripke has however left somehow undecided what the role of context is in determining which is the direct referent for a name. According to one interpretation of his thought, context has (...)
     
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  13.  47
    Nathanael Stein (2011). Aristotle's Causal Pluralism. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 93 (2):121-147.
    Central to Aristotle's metaphysics and epistemology is the claim that ‘ aitia ’ – ‘cause’ – is “said in many ways”, i.e., multivocal. Though the importance of the four causes in Aristotle's system cannot be overstated, the nature of his pluralism about aitiai has not been addressed. It is not at all obvious how these modes of causation are related to one another, or why they all deserve a common term. Nor is it clear, in particular, whether the causes are (...)
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  14.  9
    Allan F. Hanson (2004). From Classification to Indexing: How Automation Transforms the Way We Think. Social Epistemology 18 (4):333 – 356.
    To classify is to organize the particulars in a body of information according to some meaningful scheme. Difficulty recognizing metaphor, synonyms and homonyms, and levels of generalization renders those applications of artificial intelligence that are currently in widespread use at a loss to deal effectively with classification. Indexing conveys nothing about relationships; it pinpoints information on particular topics without reference to anything else. Keyword searching is a form of indexing, and here artificial intelligence excels. Growing reliance on automated means (...)
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