Search results for 'Homunculus' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  17
    András Lörincz, Barnabás Póczos, Gábor Szirtes & Bálint Takács (2002). Ockham's Razor at Work: Modeling of the ``Homunculus''. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (2):187-220.
    There is a broad consensus about the fundamental role of thehippocampal system (hippocampus and its adjacent areas) in theencoding and retrieval of episodic memories. This paper presents afunctional model of this system. Although memory is not asingle-unit cognitive function, we took the view that the wholesystem of the smooth, interrelated memory processes may have acommon basis. That is why we follow the Ockham's razor principleand minimize the size or complexity of our model assumption set.The fundamental assumption is the requirement of (...)
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  2. Stephen L. White (1987). What is It Like to Be a Homunculus? Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 68 (June):148-74.
     
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  3.  21
    Harry Smit (2010). Weismann, Wittgenstein and the Homunculus Fallacy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (3):263-271.
    A problem that has troubled both neo-Darwinists and neo-Lamarckians is whether instincts involve knowledge. This paper discusses the contributions to this problem of the evolutionary biologist August Weismann and the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. Weismann discussed an empirical homunculus fallacy: Lamarck’s theory mistakenly presupposes a homunculus in the germ cells. Wittgenstein discussed a conceptual homunculus fallacy which applies to Lamarck’s theory: it is mistaken to suppose that knowledge is stored in the brain or DNA. The upshot of these (...)
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  4.  24
    Joseph Margolis (1980). The Trouble with Homunculus Theories. Philosophy of Science 47 (June):244-259.
    The so-called post-Wittgensteinian Oxford philosophers are often criticized not only for failing to provide for the causal explanation of human behavior and psychological states, but also for failing to recognize that psychological explanations require appeal to sub-personal or molecular processes. Three strategies accommodating this criticism appear in so-called homunculus theories and include: (1) that the sub-systems be assigned intentional or informational content purely heuristically; (2) that the intentional or informational content of molar states be analyzed without remainder in terms (...)
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  5.  5
    Job van den Hurk, Felipe Pegado, Farah Martens & Hans P. Op de Beeck (2015). The Search for the Face of the Visual Homunculus. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (11):638-641.
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  6. A. Kenny (1971). The Homunculus Fallacy. In Marjorie Glicksman Grene & I. Prigogine (eds.), Interpretations of Life and Mind. New York,Humanities Press 155-165.
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  7.  15
    George A. Michael & Janick Naveteur (2011). The Tickly Homunculus and the Origins of Spontaneous Sensations Arising on the Hands. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):603-617.
    Everyone has felt those tingling, tickly sensations occurring spontaneously all over the body in the absence of stimuli. But does anyone know where they come from? Here, right-handed subjects were asked to focus on one hand while looking at it and while looking away and subsequently to map and describe the spatial and qualitative attributes of sensations arising spontaneously. The spatial distribution of spontaneous sensations followed a proximo-distal gradient, similar to the one previously described for the density of receptive units. (...)
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  8.  4
    Erik M. Altmann (2003). Task Switching and the Pied Homunculus: Where Are We Being Led? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (8):340-341.
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  9.  22
    Gianfranco Dalla Barba (2001). Beyond the Memory-Trace Paradox and the Fallacy of Homunculus: A Hypothesis Concerning the Relationship Between Memory, Consciousness and Temporality. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (3):51-78.
  10.  58
    Ray S. Jackendoff (2000). Unconscious, Yes; Homunculus,??? Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):17-20.
  11.  5
    George J. Annas (1989). A French Homunculus in a Tennessee Court. Hastings Center Report 19 (6):20-22.
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  12.  8
    Hannelore Schröder (1996). Who is Human? On the Antifeminist Propaganda of Herrenmenschy Homunculus, and Untermensch. The European Legacy 1 (3):1045-1051.
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  13.  11
    Paul Tibbetts (1995). Neurobiology and the Homunculus Thesis. Man and World 28 (4):401-413.
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  14. Francis Crick & Christof Koch (2000). The Unconscious Homunculus. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press 3-11.
  15. Jaak Panksepp (2000). The Cradle of Consciousness: A Periconscious Emotional Homunculus? Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):24-32.
  16.  16
    Stephen P. Thornton (1993). Sempiternity, Immortality and the Homunculus Fallacy. Philosophical Investigations 16 (4):307-326.
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  17.  18
    Horace B. Barlow (1998). Prediction, Inference, and the Homunculus. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):750-751.
    Prediction, like filling-in, is an example of pattern completion and both are likely to involve processes of statistical inference. Furthermore, there is no incompatibility between inference and neural filling-in, for the neural processes may be mediating the inferential processes. The usefulness of the “bridge locus” is defended, and it is also suggested that the interpersonal level needs to be included when considering subjective experience.
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  18.  2
    Michael Gabriel (1982). Homunculus in the Subiculum. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):485.
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  19.  2
    Jonathan Harrison (2009). How Ludwig Became a Homunculus: Harrison How Ludwig Became a Homunculus. Think 8 (21):7-12.
    Jonathan Harrison teases our minds with two short stories ….
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  20.  1
    Harry Smit (2010). Weismann, Wittgenstein and the Homunculus Fallacy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (3):263-271.
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  21.  3
    Herman H. Spitz (1986). Ghosts of the Homunculus and of Sigmund Freud. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):581.
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  22.  5
    Raymond Ruyer (1957). Homunculus et Méganthrope. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 62 (3):266 - 285.
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  23.  1
    George J. Annas (forthcoming). At Law: A French Homunculus in a Tennessee Court. Hastings Center Report.
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  24.  2
    J. E. R. Staddon (1984). Skinner's Behaviorism Implies a Subcutaneous Homunculus. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):647.
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  25.  6
    Jonathan Harrison (1996). How Ludwig Became a Homunculus. Philosophy 71 (277):439 - 444.
    Jonathan Harrison teases our minds with two short stories ….
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  26.  4
    Mary Midgley (1990). Homunculus Trouble, or, What is Applied Philosophy? Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (1):5-15.
  27.  1
    Frederick M. Toates (1984). Models, Yes; Homunculus, No. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):650.
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  28. Lorincz Andras, Poczos Barnabas, Szirtes Gabor & Takacs Balint (2002). Ockham's Razor at Work: Modeling of the``Homunculus''. Brain and Mind 3 (2).
     
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  29. G. D. Barba (2001). Beyond the Memory-Trace Paradox and the Fallacy of the Homunculus: A Hypothesis Concerning the Relationship Between Memory, Consciousness and Temporality. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (3):51-78.
     
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  30. George T. Jacobi (1968). In Search of Homunculus. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 11 (4):603-614.
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  31. Sally A. Linkenauger, Hong Yu Wong, Michael Geuss, Jeanine K. Stefanucci, Kathleen C. McCulloch, Heinrich H. Bülthoff, Betty J. Mohler & Dennis R. Proffitt (2015). The Perceptual Homunculus: The Perception of the Relative Proportions of the Human Body. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 144 (1):103-113.
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  32. Alan K. Mackworth (1984). The Homunculus as Bureaucrat. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):74.
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  33. Amelie Rorty (1971). Not Every Homunculus Spoils the Argument. In Marjorie G. Grene (ed.), Interpretations of Life and Mind: Essays Around the Problem of Reduction. Humanities Press 75.
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  34. James H. Schwartz (2000). The Unconscious Homunculus: Comment. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):36-37.
  35. J. David Smith (1995). The Homunculus at Home. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):697.
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  36.  4
    Justin M. Riddle (2015). Fractal Cognitive Triad: The Theoretical Connection Between Subjective Experience and Neural Oscillations. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 11 (2):130-145.
    It has long been appreciated that the brain is oscillatory 1. Early measurements of brain electrophysiology revealed rhythmic synchronization unifying large swaths of the brain. The study of neural oscillation has enveloped cognitive neuroscience and neural systems. The traditional belief that oscillations are epiphenomenal of neuron spiking is being challenged by intracellular oscillations and the theoretical backing that oscillatory activity is fundamental to physics. Subjective experience oscillates at three particular frequency bands in a cognitive triad: perception at 5 Hz, action (...)
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  37.  39
    E. Sayan (1988). A Closer Look at the Chinese Nation Argument. Philosophy Research Archives 13:129-36.
    Ned Block’s Chinese Nation Argument is offered as a counterexample to Turing-machine functionalism. According to that argument, one billion Chinese could be organized to instantiate Turing-machine descriptions of mental states. Since we wouldn’t want to impute qualia to such an organized population, functionalism cannot account for the qualitative character of mental states like pain. Paul Churchland and Patricia Churchland have challenged that argument by trying to show that an adequate representation of the complexity of mind requires at least 10 30,000,000 (...)
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  38.  9
    Fadwa Cazala, Nicolas Vienney & Serge Stoléru (2015). The Cortical Sensory Representation of Genitalia in Women and Men: A Systematic Review. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 5.
    Background. Although genital sensations are an essential aspect of sexual behavior, the cortical somatosensory representation of genitalia in women and men remain poorly known and contradictory results have been reported. Objective. To conduct a systematic review of studies based on electrophysiological and functional neuroimaging studies, with the aim to identify insights brought by modern methods since the early descriptions of the sensory homunculus in the primary somatosensory cortex . Results. The review supports the interpretation that there are two distinct (...)
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  39.  36
    Geert Keil (2003). Über den Homunkulus-Fehlschluß. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 57 (1):1 - 26.
    Ein Homunkulus im philosophischen Sprachgebrauch ist eine postulierte menschenähnliche Instanz, die ausdrücklich oder unausdrücklich zur Erklärung der Arbeitsweise des menschlichen Geistes herangezogen wird. Als Homunkulus-Fehlschluß wird die Praxis bezeichnet, Prädikate, die auf kognitive oder perzeptive Leistungen einer ganzen Person zutreffen, auch auf Teile von Personen oder auf subpersonale Vorgänge anzuwenden, was typischerweise zu einem Regreß führt. Der vorliegende Beitrag erörtert den Homunkulus-Fehlschluß zunächst in argumentationstheoretischer Hinsicht und stellt dabei ein Diagnoseschema auf. Dann werden zwei Anwendungsfelder erörtert: Instanzenmodelle der Psyche (Platon, (...)
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  40. William G. Lycan (1987). Consciousness. MIT Press.
    In this book, William Lycan reviews the diverse philosophical views on consciousness--including those of Kripke, Block, Campbell, Sellars, and Casteneda--and ..
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  41.  89
    Geert Keil (2010). Über den Homunkulus-Fehlschluss. E-Journal Philosophie der Psychologie 14.
    Ein Homunkulus im philosophischen Sprachgebrauch ist eine postulierte menschenähnliche Instanz, die ausdrücklich oder unausdrücklich zur Erklärung der Arbeitsweise des menschlichen Geistes herangezogen wird. Als Homunkulus-Fehlschluß wird die Praxis bezeichnet, Prädikate, die auf kognitive oder perzeptive Leistungen einer ganzen Person zutreffen, auch auf Teile von Personen oder auf subpersonale Vorgänge anzuwenden, was typischerweise zu einem Regreß führt. Der vorliegende Beitrag erörtert den Homunkulus-Fehlschluß zunächst in argumentationstheoretischer Hinsicht und stellt dabei ein Diagnoseschema auf. Dann werden zwei Anwendungsfelder erörtert: Instanzenmodelle der Psyche (Platon, (...)
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  42.  5
    Bartlomiej Swiatczak & Irun R. Cohen (forthcoming). Gut Feelings of Safety: Tolerance to the Microbiota Mediated by Innate Immune Receptors. Microbiology and Immunology.
    To enable microbial colonisation of the gut mucosa, the intestinal immune system must not only react to danger signals but also recognize cues that indicate safety. Safety recognition, paradoxically, is mediated by the same environmental sensors that are involved in signalling danger. Indeed, in addition to their well established role in inducing inflammation in response to stress signals, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and a variety of metabolic sensors also promote gut-microbiota symbiosis by responding to "microbial symbiosis factors", "resolution-associated molecular patterns", (...)
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  43. Tim Crane (2003). The Mechanical Mind: A Philosophical Introduction to Minds, Machines, and Mental Representation. Routledge.
    This edition has been fully revised and updated, and includes a new chapter on consciousness and a new section on modularity. There are also guides for further reading, and a new glossary of terms such as mentalese, connectionism, and the homunculus fallacy.
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  44. Panayiota Vassilopoulou & Jonardon Ganeri (2011). The Geography of Shadows: Souls and Cities in P. Pullman's His Dark Materials. Philosophy and Literature 35 (2):269-281.
    The soul is an elusive thing, and anyone who wants to describe it must do so with metaphors, painting it in a picture of words. The metaphors one chooses for this task will reflect the aspects one is most eager to promote of what it is to be a person, a living, breathing, thinking presence in the world. Popularly, the soul is often pictured as a little fellow inside one's head, a homunculus with whom one is in constant communication. (...)
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  45. Johnjoe McFadden (2013). The CEMI Field Theory Gestalt Information and the Meaning of Meaning. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (3-4):3-4.
    In earlier papers I described the conscious electromagnetic information (CEMI) field theory, which claimed that the substrate of consciousness is the brain’s electromagnetic (EM) field. I here further explore this theory by examining the properties and dynamics of the information underlying meaning in consciousness. I argue that meaning suffers from a binding problem, analogous to the binding problem described for visual perception, and describe how the gestalt (holistic) properties of meaning give rise to this binding problem. To clarify the role (...)
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  46.  3
    Andreas Roepstorff & Chris Frith (2004). What's at the Top in the Top-Down Control of Action? Script-Sharing and 'Top-Top' Control of Action in Cognitive Experiments. Psychological Research 68 (2-3):189--198.
    The distinction between bottom-up and top-down control of action has been central in cognitive psychology, and, subsequently, in functional neuroimaging. While the model has proven successful in describing central mechanisms in cognitive experiments, it has serious shortcomings in explaining how top-down control is established. In particular, questions as to what is at the top in top-down control lead us to a controlling homunculus located in a mythical brain region with outputs and no inputs. Based on a discussion of recent (...)
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  47. Jaak Panksepp (2005). On the Embodied Neural Nature of Core Emotional Affects. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (8-10):158-184.
    Basic affects reflect the diversity of satisfactions and discomforts that are inherited tools for living from our ancestral past. Affects are neurobiologically-ingrained potentials of the nervous system, which are triggered, moulded and refined by life experiences. Cognitive, information- processing approaches and computational metaphors cannot penetrate foundational affective processes. Animal models allow us to empirically analyse the large-scale neural ensembles that generate emotional-action dynamics that are critically important for creating emotional feelings. Such approaches offer robust neuro-epistemological strategies to decode the fundamental (...)
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  48. Steven Lehar (2003). Gestalt Isomorphism and the Primacy of Subjective Conscious Experience: A Gestalt Bubble Model. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):357-408.
    A serious crisis is identified in theories of neurocomputation, marked by a persistent disparity between the phenomenological or experiential account of visual perception and the neurophysiological level of description of the visual system. In particular, conventional concepts of neural processing offer no explanation for the holistic global aspects of perception identified by Gestalt theory. The problem is paradigmatic and can be traced to contemporary concepts of the functional role of the neural cell, known as the Neuron Doctrine. In the absence (...)
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  49. Ronald P. Endicott (1996). Searle, Syntax, and Observer-Relativity. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):101-22.
    I critically examine some provocative arguments that John Searle presents in his book The Rediscovery of Mind to support the claim that the syntactic states of a classical computational system are "observer relative" or "mind dependent" or otherwise less than fully and objectively real. I begin by explaining how this claim differs from Searle's earlier and more well-known claim that the physical states of a machine, including the syntactic states, are insufficient to determine its semantics. In contrast, his more recent (...)
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  50.  19
    Ilkka Pyysiäinen (2015). Theism Reconsidered: Belief in God and the Existence of God. Zygon 50 (1):138-150.
    This article develops a new perspective on theism that makes the simple juxtaposition of theism and atheism problematic, and helps bridge philosophy of religion and the empirical study of religious phenomena. The basic idea is developed inspired by Terrence Deacon's book Incomplete Nature and its description of “ententional” phenomena, together with some ideas from the cognitive science of religion, especially those related to agency and “theological correctness.” It is argued that God should not be understood as a “homunculus” that (...)
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