Search results for 'Hopi ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  5
    Richard B. Brandt (1954). Hopi Ethics. [Chicago]University of Chicago Press.
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  2.  6
    A. Macbeath & Richard B. Brandt (1957). Hopi Ethics. A Theoretical Analysis. Philosophical Quarterly 7 (27):173.
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    Paul Diesing (1955). Book Review:Hopi Ethics. Richard B. Brandt. [REVIEW] Ethics 65 (4):314-.
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    Hubert G. Alexander (1955). Brandt on Hopi Ethics. Review of Metaphysics 9 (1):106 - 111.
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  5.  6
    L. J. Russell (1957). Hopi Ethics. A Theoretical Analysis. By Richard B. Brandt. (The University of Chicago Press. 1954. Pp. X + 398. Price £2 16s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 32 (120):75-.
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  6. Edel Edel (1955). RANDT'S Hopi Ethics. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 16:252.
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  7. D. Emmet (1957). BRANDT, R. B. - Hopi Ethics; A Theoretical Analysis. [REVIEW] Mind 66:562.
     
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  8. A. Macbeath (1957). "Hopi Ethics". By Richard B. Brandt. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 7 (27):173.
     
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  9. Andrew Sneddon (2009). Normative Ethics and the Prospects of an Empirical Contribution to Assessment of Moral Disagreement and Moral Realism. Journal of Value Inquiry 43 (4):447-455.
    The familiar argument from disagreement has been an important focal point of discussion in contemporary meta-ethics. Over the past decade, there has been an explosion of interdisciplinary work between philosophers and psychologists about moral psychology. Working within this trend, John Doris and Alexandra Plakias have made a tentative version of the argument from disagreement on empirical grounds. Doris and Plakias present empirical evidence in support of premise 4, that ethics is beset by fundamental disagreement. They examine Richard Brandt (...)
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  10.  42
    John Raymond Boatright (2009). Ethics and the Conduct of Business. Pearson Prentice Hall.
    Ethics in the world of business -- Welfare, rights, and justice -- Equality, liberty, and virtue -- Whistle-blowing -- Trade secrets and conflict of interest -- Privacy -- Discrimination and affirmative action -- Employment rights -- Occupational health and safety -- Marketing, advertising, and product safety -- Ethics in finance -- Corporate social responsibility -- Corporate governance and accountability -- International business ethics.
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  11. Immanuel Kant (2007/1980). Lectures on Ethics. In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), International Journal of Ethics. Blackwell Pub. Ltd. 104-106.
    This volume contains four versions of the lecture notes taken by Kant's students of his university courses in ethics given regularly over a period of some thirty years. The notes are very complete and expound not only Kant's views on ethics but many of his opinions on life and human nature. Much of this material has never before been translated into English. As with other volumes in the series, there are copious linguistic and explanatory notes and (...)
     
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  12. Ronald R. Sims & Johannes Brinkmann (2003). Enron Ethics (Or: Culture Matters More Than Codes). [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 45 (3):243 - 256.
    This paper describes and discusses the Enron Corporation debacle. The paper presents the business ethics background and leadership mechanisms affecting Enron''s collapse and eventual bankruptcy. Through a systematic analysis of the organizational culture at Enron (following Schein''s frame of reference) the paper demonstrates how the company''s culture had profound effects on the ethics of its employees.
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  13.  32
    Janet S. Adams, Armen Tashchian & Ted H. Shore (2001). Codes of Ethics as Signals for Ethical Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 29 (3):199 - 211.
    This study investigated effects of codes of ethics on perceptions of ethical behavior. Respondents from companies with codes of ethics (n = 465) rated role set members (top management, supervisors, peers, subordinates, self) as more ethical and felt more encouraged and supported for ethical behavior than respondents from companies without codes (n = 301). Key aspects of the organizational climate, such as supportiveness for ethical behavior, freedom to act ethically, and satisfaction with the outcome of ethical problems were (...)
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  14.  35
    Scott J. Vitell (2003). Consumer Ethics Research: Review, Synthesis and Suggestions for the Future. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):33 - 47.
    This manuscript reviews and synthesizes most of the major research studies in the area of consumer ethics that have appeared since 1990. It examines both conceptual and empirical works with an objective of encouraging researchers to pursue research in the consumer ethics area. Toward this end, the paper also suggests directions for future research.
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  15. M. Schwartz (2001). The Nature of the Relationship Between Corporate Codes of Ethics and Behaviour. Journal of Business Ethics 32 (3):247 - 262.
    A study was conducted in order to examine the relationship between corporate codes of ethics and behaviour. Fifty-seven interviews of employees, managers, and ethics officers were conducted at four large Canadian companies. The study found that codes of ethics are a potential factor influencing the behaviour of corporate agents. Reasons are provided why codes are violated as well as complied with. A set of eight metaphors are developed which help to explain how codes of (...)
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  16.  8
    John Raymond Boatright (2008). Ethics in Finance. Blackwell Pub..
    This second edition of the ground-breaking Ethics in Finance, is an up-to-date, valuable addition to the emerging field of finance ethics. Citing examples of the scandals that have shaken public confidence in the ethics of Wall Street, this text explains the importance of ethics the operation of financial institutions and in the personal conduct of finance professionals. Focuses on practical issues that confront finance professionals and policy makers Now includes discussion of issues (...)
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  17. Peter Singer (2005). Ethics and Intuitions. Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):331 - 352.
    For millennia, philosophers have speculated about the origins of ethics. Recent research in evolutionary psychology and the neurosciences has shed light on that question. But this research also has normative significance. A standard way of arguing against a normative ethical theory is to show that in some circumstances the theory leads to judgments that are contrary to our common moral intuitions. If, however, these moral intuitions are the biological residue of our evolutionary history, it is not clear why (...)
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  18.  21
    Stephen J. Conroy & Tisha L. N. Emerson (2004). Business Ethics and Religion: Religiosity as a Predictor of Ethical Awareness Among Students. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 50 (4):383-396.
    We survey students at two Southern United States universities (one public and one private, religiously affiliated). Using a survey instrument that includes 25 vignettes, we test two important hypotheses: whether ethical attitudes are affected by religiosity (H1) and whether ethical attitudes are affected by courses in ethics, religion or theology (H2). Using a definition of religiosity based on behavior (church attendance), our results indicate that religiosity is a statistically significant predictor of responses in a number of ethical scenarios. (...)
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  19.  62
    Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman (2008). Ethics Programs, Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility and Job Satisfaction. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):159 - 172.
    Companies offer ethics codes and training to increase employees’ ethical conduct. These programs can also enhance individual work attitudes because ethical organizations are typically valued. Socially responsible companies are likely viewed as ethical organizations and should therefore prompt similar employee job responses. Using survey information collected from 313 business professionals, this exploratory study proposed that perceived corporate social responsibility would mediate the positive relationships between ethics codes/training and job satisfaction. Results indicated that corporate social responsibility fully (...)
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  20. Brenda E. Joyner & Dinah Payne (2002). Evolution and Implementation: A Study of Values, Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 41 (4):297 - 311.
    There is growing recognition that good ethics can have a positive economic impact on the performance of firms. Many statistics support the premise that ethics, values, integrity and responsibility are required in the modern workplace. For consumer groups and society at large, research has shown that good ethics is good business. This study defines and traces the emergence and evolution within the business literature of the concepts of values, business ethics and corporate (...)
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  21.  43
    Domènec Melé (2009). Integrating Personalism Into Virtue-Based Business Ethics: The Personalist and the Common Good Principles. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):227 - 244.
    Some virtue ethicists are reluctant to consider principles and standards in business ethics. However, this is problematic. This paper argues that realistic Personalism can be integrated into virtue-based business ethics, giving it a more complete base. More specifically, two principles are proposed: the Personalist Principle (PP) and the Common Good Principle (CGP). The PP includes the Golden Rule and makes explicit the duty of respect, benevolence, and care for people, emphasizing human dignity and the innate rights (...)
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  22.  91
    Mark S. Schwartz (2002). A Code of Ethics for Corporatecode of Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):27 - 43.
    Are corporate codes of ethics necessarily ethical? To challenge this notion, an initial set of universal moral standards is proposed by which all corporate codes of ethics can be ethically evaluated. The set of universal moral standards includes: (1) trustworthiness; (2) respect; (3) responsibility; (4) fairness; (5) caring; and (6) citizenship. By applying the six moral standards to four different stages of code development (i.e., content, creation, implementation, administration), a code of ethics for corporate (...)
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  23.  23
    Gary R. Weaver, Linda Klebe Treviño & Philip L. Cochran (1999). Corporate Ethics Practices in the Mid-1990's: An Empirical Study of the Fortune 1000. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 18 (3):283 - 294.
    This empirical study of Fortune 1000 firms assesses the degree to which those firms have adopted various practices associated with corporate ethics programs. The study examines the following aspects of formalized corporate ethics activity: ethics-oriented policy statements; formalization of management responsibilities for ethics; free-standing ethics offices; ethics and compliance telephone reporting/advice systems; top management and departmental involvement in ethics activities; usage of ethics training and (...)
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  24.  28
    Barbara A. Ritter (2006). Can Business Ethics Be Trained? A Study of the Ethical Decision-Making Process in Business Students. Journal of Business Ethics 68 (2):153 - 164.
    The purpose of this paper is to examine the various guidelines presented in the literature for instituting an ethics curriculum and to empirically study their effectiveness. Three questions are addressed concerning the trainability of ethics material and the proper integration and implementation of an ethics curriculum. An empirical study then tested the effect of ethics training on moral awareness and reasoning. The sample consisted of two business classes, one exposed to additional ethics curriculum (...)
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  25. Christopher Cosans (2009). Does Milton Friedman Support a Vigorous Business Ethics? Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):391 - 399.
    This paper explores the level of obligation called for by Milton Friedman’s classic essay “The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase Profits.” Several scholars have argued that Friedman asserts that businesses have no or minimal social duties beyond compliance with the law. This paper argues that this reading of Friedman does not give adequate weight to some claims that he makes and to their logical extensions. Throughout his article, Friedman emphasizes the values of freedom, respect for law, and duty. (...)
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  26.  24
    Ethan P. Waples, Alison L. Antes, Stephen T. Murphy, Shane Connelly & Michael D. Mumford (2009). A Meta-Analytic Investigation of Business Ethics Instruction. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):133 - 151.
    The education of students and professionals in business ethics is an increasingly important goal on the agenda of business schools and corporations. The present study provides a meta-analysis of 25 previously conducted business ethics instructional programs. The role of criteria, study design, participant characteristics, quality of instruction, instructional content, instructional program characteristics, and characteristics of instructional methods as moderators of the effectiveness of business ethics instruction were examined. Overall, results indicate that business ethics instructional programs have (...)
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  27. Mark S. Schwartz (2005). Universal Moral Values for Corporate Codes of Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):27 - 44.
    How can one establish if a corporate code of ethics is ethical in terms of its content? One important first step might be the establishment of core universal moral values by which corporate codes of ethics can be ethically constructed and evaluated. Following a review of normative research on corporate codes of ethics, a set of universal moral values is generated by considering three sources: (1) corporate codes of ethics; (...)
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  28.  48
    Gary Kok Yew chan (2008). The Relevance and Value of Confucianism in Contemporary Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):347 - 360.
    This article examines the relevance and value of Confucian Ethics to contemporary Business Ethics by comparing their respective perspectives and approaches towards business activities within the modern capitalist framework, the principle of reciprocity and the concept of human virtues. Confucian Ethics provides interesting parallels with contemporary Western-oriented Business Ethics. At the same, it diverges from contemporary Business Ethics in some significant ways. Upon an examination of philosophical texts as well as (...)
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  29.  36
    Sean Valentine & Tim Barnett (2002). Ethics Codes and Sales Professionals' Perceptions of Their Organizations' Ethical Values. Journal of Business Ethics 40 (3):191 - 200.
    Most large companies and many smaller ones have adopted ethics codes, but the evidence is mixed as to whether they have a positive impact on the behavior of employees. We suggest that one way that ethics codes could contribute to ethical behavior is by influencing the perceptions that employees have about the ethical values of organizations. We examine whether a group of sales professionals in organizations with ethics codes perceive that their organizational context is more supportive (...)
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  30.  73
    Mohamed M. Ahmed, Kun Young Chung & John W. Eichenseher (2003). Business Students' Perception of Ethics and Moral Judgment: A Cross-Cultural Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):89 - 102.
    Business relations rely on shared perceptions of what is acceptable/expected norms of behavior. Immense expansion in transnational business made rudimentary consensus on acceptable business practices across cultural boundaries particularly important. Nonetheless, as more and more nations with different cultural and historical experiences interact in the global economy, the potential for misunderstandings based on different expectations is magnified. Such misunderstandings emerge in a growing literature on "improper" business practices – articulated from a narrow cultural perspective. This paper reports an ongoing research (...)
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  31.  48
    Mark S. Schwartz, Thomas W. Dunfee & Michael J. Kline (2005). Tone at the Top: An Ethics Code for Directors? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):79 - 100.
    . Recent corporate scandals have focused the attention of a broad set of constituencies on reforming corporate governance. Boards of directors play a leading role in corporate governance and any significant reforms must encompass their role. To date, most reform proposals have targeted the legal, rather than the ethical obligations of directors. Legal reforms without proper attention to ethical obligations will likely prove ineffectual. The ethical role of directors is critical. Directors have overall responsibility for the ethics and (...)
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  32. Mark S. Schwartz (2004). Effective Corporate Codes of Ethics: Perceptions of Code Users. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):323 - 343.
    The study examines employee, managerial, and ethics officer perceptions regarding their companies codes of ethics. The study moves beyond examining the mere existence of a code of ethics to consider the role that code content and code process (i.e. creation, implementation, and administration) might play with respect to the effectiveness of codes in influencing behavior. Fifty-seven in-depth, semi-structured interviews of employees, managers, and ethics officers were conducted at four large Canadian companies. The factors viewed by (...)
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  33.  55
    J. Thomas Whetstone (2001). How Virtue Fits Within Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 33 (2):101 - 114.
    This paper proposes that managers add an attention to virtues and vices of human character as a full complement to moral reasoning according to a deontological focus on obligations to act and a teleological focus on consequences (a balanced tripartite approach). Even if the criticisms of virtue ethics cloud its use as a mononomic normative theory of justification, they do not refute the substantial benefits of applying a human character perspective – when done so in conjunction with also-imperfect (...)
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  34.  42
    A. Catherine McCabe, Rhea Ingram & Mary Conway Dato-on (2006). The Business of Ethics and Gender. Journal of Business Ethics 64 (2):101 - 116.
    Unethical decision-making behavior within organizations has received increasing attention over the past ten years. As a result, a plethora of studies have examined the relationship between gender and business ethics. However, these studies report conflicting results as to whether or not men and women differ with regards to business ethics. In this article, we propose that gender identity theory [Spence: 1993, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 64, 624–635], provides both the theory and empirical measures to (...)
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  35.  51
    Ronald R. Sims & Edward L. Felton (2006). Designing and Delivering Business Ethics Teaching and Learning. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (3):297 - 312.
    The recent corporate scandals in the United States have caused a renewed interest and focus on teaching business ethics. Business schools and their faculties are reexamining the teaching of business ethics and are reassessing their responsibilities to produce honest and truthful managers who live lives of integrity and ethical accountability. The authors recognize that no agreement exists among business schools and their faculties regarding what should be the content and pedagogy of a course in business (...). However, the authors hold that regardless of one’s biases regarding the content and pedagogy, the effective teaching of business ethics requires that the instructor in designing and delivering a business ethics course needs to focus particular attention on four principal questions: (1) what are the objectives or targeted learning outcomes of the course? (2) what kind of learning environment should be created? (3) what learning processes need to be employed to achieve the goals? and (4) what are the roles of the participants in the learning experience? The answers to these questions provide the foundations for any business ethics course. The answers are major determinants of the impact of a business ethics course on the thinking of students and the views on the ethical and professional accountabilities and responsibilities of managers in the workplace. (shrink)
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  36. Christian Miller (2003). Social Psychology and Virtue Ethics. Journal of Ethics 7 (4):365-392.
    Several philosophers have recently claimed to have discovered a new and rather significant problem with virtue ethics. According to them, virtue ethics generates certain expectations about the behavior of human beings which are subject to empirical testing. But when the relevant experimental work is done in social psychology, the results fall remarkably short of meeting those expectations. So, these philosophers think, despite its recent success, virtue ethics has far less to offer to contemporary ethical (...)
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  37.  83
    Marcia Baron (1995). Kantian Ethics Almost Without Apology. Cornell University Press.
    The emphasis on duly in Kant's ethics is widely held to constitute a defect. Marcia W. Baron develops and assesses the criticism, which she sees as comprising two objections: that duty plays too large a role, leaving no room for the supererogatory, and that Kant places too much value on acting from duty. Clearly written and cogently argued, Kantian Ethics Almost without Apology takes on the most philosophically intriguing objections to Kant's ethics and subjects (...)
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  38.  50
    Scott J. Vitell & James Muncy (2005). The Muncy–Vitell Consumer Ethics Scale: A Modification and Application. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):267 - 275.
    This study compares college students with other adults in terms of the Muncy–Vitell (1992) consumer ethics scale. Further, the study updates the Muncy–Vitell consumer ethics scale with modifications that include rewording and the addition of new items. These new items can be grouped into three distinct categories – (1) downloading/buying counterfeit goods, (2) recycling/environmental awareness and (3) doing the right thing/doing good. The study also compares these two groups in terms of their attitude toward business. Results (...)
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  39.  23
    Justin G. Longenecker, Joseph A. McKinney & Carlos W. Moore (2004). Religious Intensity, Evangelical Christianity, and Business Ethics: An Empirical Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):373 - 386.
    Research on the relationship between religious commitment and business ethics has produced widely varying results and made the impact of such commitment unclear. This study presents an empirical investigation based on a questionnaire survey of business managers and professionals in the United States yielding a database of 1234 respondents. Respondents evaluated the ethical acceptability of 16 business decisions. Findings varied with the way in which the religion variable was measured. Little relationship between religious commitment and ethical judgment was found (...)
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  40.  43
    Bert Scholtens & Lammertjan Dam (2007). Cultural Values and International Differences in Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 75 (3):273 - 284.
    We analyze ethical policies of firms in industrialized countries and try to find out whether culture is a factor that plays a significant role in explaining country differences. We look into the firm’s human rights policy, its governance of bribery and corruption, and the comprehensiveness, implementation and communication of its codes of ethics. We use a dataset on ethical policies of almost 2,700 firms in 24 countries. We find that there are significant differences among ethical policies of firms headquartered (...)
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  41.  21
    Brad S. Long & Cathy Driscoll (2008). Codes of Ethics and the Pursuit of Organizational Legitimacy: Theoretical and Empirical Contributions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):173 - 189.
    The focus of this paper is to further a discussion of codes of ethics as institutionalized organizational structures that extend some form of legitimacy to organizations. The particular form of legitimacy is of critical importance to our analysis. After reviewing various theories of legitimacy, we analyze the literature on how legitimacy is derived from codes of ethics to discover which specific form of legitimacy is gained from their presence in organizations. We content analyze a sample of (...)
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  42.  27
    Sven Helin & Johan Sandström (2007). An Inquiry Into the Study of Corporate Codes of Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 75 (3):253 - 271.
    This paper takes its point of departure in an article by Stevens [Stevens, B.: 1994, Journal of Business Ethics 54, 163–171], in which she identified a lack of knowledge regarding how corporate codes of ethics are communicated and affect behavior in organizations. Taking heed of this suggested gap, we review studies on corporate codes of ethics with an empirical content, published since 1994. The conclusion of the review is that we still lack knowledge on how codes work, (...)
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  43.  22
    Robert C. Erffmeyer, Bruce D. Keillor & Debbie Thorne LeClair (1999). An Empirical Investigation of Japanese Consumer Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 18 (1):35 - 50.
    One of the gaps in the current international marketing literature is in the area of consumer ethics. Using a sample drawn from Japanese consumers, this study investigates these individuals' reported ethical ideology and their perception of a number of different ethical situations in the realm of consumer behavior. Comparisons are then made across several demographic characteristics. The results reveal differences which provide theoretical support for expanded research in the area of cross-cultural/cross-national consumer ethics and highlight the (...)
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  44.  19
    Thomas L. Carson (2003). Self-Interest and Business Ethics: Some Lessons of the Recent Corporate Scandals. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (4):389 - 394.
    The recent accounting scandals at Enron, WorldCom, and other corporations have helped to fuel a massive loss of confidence in the integrity of American business and have contributed to a very sharp decline in the U.S. stock market. Inasmuch as these events have brought ethical questions about business to the forefront in the media and public consciousness as never before, they are of signal importance for the field of business ethics. I offer some observations and conjectures about the bearing (...)
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  45.  37
    Cubie L. L. Lau (2010). A Step Forward: Ethics Education Matters! [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):565 - 584.
    Ethics education matters! Contrary to some common beliefs that ethical behavior is inborn, this study suggests that education does matter. This paper examines ethics education and its relationship with students’ ethical awareness and moral reasoning. Attitudes Towards Business Ethics Questionnaire and 10 vignettes were deployed as the major measurement instruments. It is hypothesized that students with ethics education will have both a greater ethical awareness and ability to (...)
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  46. Alexander Bertland (2009). Virtue Ethics in Business and the Capabilities Approach. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):25 - 32.
    Recently, Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum have developed the capabilities approach to provide a model for understanding the effectiveness of programs to help the developing nations. The approach holds that human beings are fundamentally free and have a sense of human dignity. Therefore, institutions need to help people enhance this dignity by providing them with the opportunity to develop their capabilities freely. I argue that this approach may help support business ethics based on virtue. Since teleology has become problematic, (...)
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  47.  16
    Greg Wood (2000). A Cross Cultural Comparison of the Contents of Codes of Ethics: USA, Canada and Australia. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 25 (4):287 - 298.
    This paper examines the contents of the codes of ethics of 83 of the top 500 companies operating in the private sector in Australia in an attempt to discover whether there are national characteristics that differentiate the codes used by companies operating in Australia from codes used by companies operating in the American and Canadian systems. The studies that were used as a comparison were Mathews (1987) for the United States of America and Lefebvre and Singh (1992) for Canada. (...)
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  48.  33
    Ellen J. Kennedy & Leigh Lawton (1998). Religiousness and Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (2):163-175.
    There is strong theoretical support for a relationship between various characteristics of religiousness and attitudes towards business ethics. This paper examines three frequently- studied dimensions of religiousness (fundamentalism, conservatism, and intrinsic religiousness) and their ability to predict students' willingness to behave unethically. Because prior research indicated a possible relationship between the religious affiliation of an institution and its members' ethical orientation, we studied students at universities with three different types of religious affiliation: evangelical, Catholic, and none.Results of the (...)
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  49.  26
    Scott J. Vitell & Encarnación Ramos Hidalgo (2006). The Impact of Corporate Ethical Values and Enforcement of Ethical Codes on the Perceived Importance of Ethics in Business: A Comparison of U.S. And Spanish Managers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):31 - 43.
    This two country study examines the effect of corporate ethical values and enforcement of a code of ethics on perceptions of the role of ethics in the overall success of the firm. Additionally, the impact of organizational commitment and of individual variables such as ethical idealism and relativism was examined. The rationale for examining the perceived importance of the role of ethics in this manner is to determine the extent to which the organization itself can influence (...)
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  50.  36
    Scott J. Vitell (2009). The Role of Religiosity in Business and Consumer Ethics: A Review of the Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):155 - 167.
    In 1949 Culliton noted that "... religion has something to offer business" (Culliton, 1949, p. 265). While religion definitely does have something to offer business, especially business ethics, it is only recently that empirical research linking religiosity and business ethics has been conducted. Indeed, religiosity affords a background, against which the ethical nature of business, including marketing and consumer behavior, can be interpreted. This article offers a descriptive, rather than normative, perspective in reviewing articles linking religion to business (...)
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