Search results for 'How Long Do We Have' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. How Long Do We Have, Every Conscious Machine Brings Us Closer to Death.score: 4020.0
    The Doomsday Argument is alive and kicking, and since its formulation in the beginning of the Eighties by the astrophysicist Brandon Carter it has gained wide attention, been strongly criticized and has been described in many different, and sometimes non-interchangeable analogies. I will briefly present the argument here, and departing from Nick Bostrom's interpretation, I will defend that doom may be sooner than we think if we start building conscious machines soon in the future.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Cheng Long (2008). On Ontology Being a Philosophy Tendency. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 17:275-296.score: 2040.0
    This paper tries to show that ontology is one of the important tendencies in the future philosophy. The author thinks that ontology as the basic spirit makes philosophy be different from other subjects. Ontology originates from people’s examination to essence of the world. However, ancient long-term argument couldn’t get any clear conclusion. So philosophers gradually understand that ontology is connected with epistemology. If we want to make a good explanation to ontology, we must return to check ourselves cognition. And (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Catherine Osborne (1983). Aristotle, De Anima 3. 2: How Do We Perceive That We See and Hear? Classical Quarterly 33 (02):401-411.score: 1086.0
    The second chapter of book three of the De anima marks the end of Aristotle's discussion of sense-perception. The chapter is a long one and apparently rambling in subject matter. It begins with a passage that is usually taken as a discussion of some sort of self-awareness, particularly awareness that one is perceiving, although such an interpretation raises some difficulties. This paper reconsiders the problems raised by supposing that the question discussed in the first paragraph is ‘how do we (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jean Kazez (2006). How Good Do We Have To Be? Philosophy Now 58:28-29.score: 1008.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jonathan Lear (2006). It is by Now a Terrifying Commonplace–Agreed to by People Across the Political Spectrum, Indeed Across the Divide of Civilizations–That Our Future Well-Being, and That of Future Generations, Depends on Shaping the Hearts and Minds of the Young. Why Do We Think This? And Do We Have Any Idea How to Do It Well? Plato is the First Person in the Western Tradition to Think Seriously About These Questions and It is Worth Going Back to Him; Not Only as a Return to Origins, but Because There Are Aspects of His ... [REVIEW] In Gerasimos Xenophon Santas (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Plato's Republic. Blackwell Pub.. 25.score: 996.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Lantz Miller (2012). If We Have a Music Instinct, for Which Music? Book Review Essay of Philip Ball,The Music Instinct: How Music Works and Why We Can't Do Without It(London: The Bodley Head, 2010). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Music Education Review 20 (2):177-190.score: 984.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ritchie Calder (1972). How Long Have We Got? Montreal,Mcgill-Queen's University Press.score: 984.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Frank J. Macke (2008). What Are 'We', And How Do We Know When We Have Communicated? American Journal of Semiotics 15 (1/4):233-248.score: 984.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. W. Franklin Harris (1995). Policy and Partnership What Have We Learned? How Can We Do Better? BioScience 45 (Supplement 1):S - 64.score: 960.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jan Narveson Narveson (2002). AIDS in the Third World: How, If at All, Do We Help? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 10 (1):109-120.score: 756.0
    The duty to help our fellows is not the same,and not stringent in the same way as thefamiliar duties to refrain from violence toothers, and to be honest. In general, beinghelpful to others is commendable, and to beheld up as a virtue. Only in cases wherereciprocity is possible and likely may we speakof anything stronger along this line. Moreover,the case of AIDS in Africa is furthercomplicated by the fact that it is easilypreventable by readily understandable behavioralterations. However, there are certainpossible (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Michael Dummett (2003). How Should We Conceive of Time? Philosophy 78 (3):387-396.score: 681.0
    A (would-be) sophisticated answer to the question of the title might be, ‘The question is senseless. We should not conceive of time at all. We should just get on with our ordinary lives, asking and answering the usual questions, such as “What Time is it?”, “How long will it take?”, and so on, which we understand perfectly well. St. Augustine understood such questions, phrased in Latin, as well as we do. He should have been content with that, instead (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jesse Hughes & Lambèr M. M. Royakkers (2008). Don't Ever Do That! Long-Term Duties in Pd E L. Studia Logica 89 (1):59 - 79.score: 681.0
    This paper studies long-term norms concerning actions. In Meyer's Propositional Deontic Logic (PDₑL), only immediate duties can be expressed, however, often one has duties of longer durations such as: "Never do that", or "Do this someday". In this paper, we will investigate how to amend (PDₑL) so that such long-term duties can be expressed. This leads to the interesting and suprising consequence that the long-term prohibition and obligation are not interdefinable in our semantics, while there is a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Kenneth A. Dahlberg (2001). Democratizing Society and Food Systems: Or How Do We Transform Modern Structures of Power? [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 18 (2):135-151.score: 676.8
    The evolution of societies and food systems across the grand transitions is traced to show how nature and culture have been transformed along with the basic structures of power, politics, and governance. A central, but neglected, element has been the synergy between the creation of industrial institutions and the exponential, but unsustainable growth of the built environment. The values, goals, and strategies needed to transform and diversify these structures – generally and in terms of food and agriculture – are (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Selmer Bringsjord (2001). Are We Evolved Computers?: A Critical Review of Steven Pinker's How the Mind Works. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 14 (2):227 – 243.score: 675.0
    Steven Pinker's How the mind works (HTMW) marks in my opinion an historic point in the history of humankind's attempt to understand itself. Socrates delivered his "know thyself" imperative rather long ago, and now, finally, in this behemoth of a book, published at the dawn of a new millennium, Pinker steps up to have psychology tell us what we are: computers crafted by evolution - end of story; mystery solved; and the poor philosophers, having never managed to obey (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Jean-Christophe Sarrazin, Axel Cleeremans & Patrick Haggard (2008). How Do We Know What We Are Doing?: Time, Intention and Awareness of Action. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):602-615.score: 672.0
    Time is a fundamental dimension of consciousness. Many studies of the “sense of agency” have investigated whether we attribute actions to ourselves based on a conscious experience of intention occurring prior to action, or based on a reconstruction after the action itself has occurred. Here, we ask the same question about a lower level aspect of action experience, namely awareness of the detailed spatial form of a simple movement. Subjects reached for a target, which unpredictably jumped to the side (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. D. Patten (2003). How Do We Deceive Ourselves. Philosophical Psychology 16 (2):229-247.score: 672.0
    Mistakes about one's own psychological states generally, and about one's reasons for acting specifically, can sometimes be considered self-deceptive. In the present paper, I address the question of how someone can come to be deceived about his own motives. I propose that false beliefs about our own reasons for acting are often formed in much the same way that we acquire false beliefs about the motives of others. In particular, I argue that non-motivated biases resulting from the way we understand (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Gillian Brock (2005). What Do We Owe Co-Nationals and Non-Nationals? Why the Liberal Nationalist Account Fails and How We Can Do Better. Journal of Global Ethics 1 (2):127 – 151.score: 672.0
    Liberal nationalists have been trying to argue that a suitably sanitized version of nationalism - namely, one that respects and embodies liberal values - is not only morally defensible, but also of great moral value, especially on grounds liberals should find very appealing. Although there are plausible aspects to the idea and some compelling arguments are offered in defense of this position, one area still proves to be a point of considerable vulnerability for this project and that is the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Dan Sperber, How Do We Communicate?score: 672.0
    Communicate. We humans do it all the time, and most of the time we do it as a matter of course, without thinking about it. We talk, we listen, we write, we read - as you are doing now - or we draw, we mimic, we nod, we point, we shrug, and, somehow, we manage to make our thoughts known to one another. Of course, there are times when we view communication as something difficult or even impossible to achieve. Yet, (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Al Gini (1998). Work, Identity and Self: How We Are Formed by the Work We Do. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (7):707-714.score: 652.8
    Because work looms so large in our lives I believe that most of us don't reflect on its importance and significance. For most of us, work is well – work, something we have to do to maintain our lives and pay the bills. I believe, however, that work is not just a part of our existence that can be easily separated from the rest of our lives. Work is not simply about the trading of labor for dollars. Perhaps because (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Diego Marconi, How Many Multiplications Can We Do?score: 648.0
    In discussions in cognitive science, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, and linguistics, it is often taken for granted that we (as well as some machines) have certain abilities, such as the ability to do multiplications or the ability to identify grammatical sentences. Such abilities are regarded as in some sense infinitary, and they are identified with, or taken to be based upon, knowledge of the relevant rules (the rule of multiplication, or the rules of grammar). In what follows, (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Dana K. Nelkin (2007). Do We Have a Coherent Set of Intuitions About Moral Responsibility? Midwest Studies in Philosophy 31 (1):243–259.score: 624.0
    I believe that the data is both fascinating and instructive, but in this paper I will resist the conclusion that we must give up Invariantism, or, as I prefer to call it, Unificationism. In the process of examining the challenging data and responding to it, I will try to draw some larger lessons about how to use the kind of data being collected. First, I will provide a brief description of some influential theories of responsibility, and then explain the threat (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Eric Schwitzgebel (2000). How Well Do We Know Our Own Conscious Experience? The Case of Human Echolocation. Philosophical Topics 28 (5-6):235-46.score: 624.0
    Researchers from the 1940's through the present have found that normal, sighted people can echolocate - that is, detect properties of silent objects by attending to sound reflected from them. We argue that echolocation is a normal part of our conscious, perceptual experience. Despite this, we argue that people are often grossly mistaken about their experience of echolocation. If so, echolocation provides a counterexample to the view that we cannot be seriously mistaken about our own current conscious experience.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Jon Williamson (2014). How Uncertain Do We Need to Be? Erkenntnis 79 (6):1249-1271.score: 624.0
    Expert probability forecasts can be useful for decision making . But levels of uncertainty escalate: however the forecaster expresses the uncertainty that attaches to a forecast, there are good reasons for her to express a further level of uncertainty, in the shape of either imprecision or higher order uncertainty . Bayesian epistemology provides the means to halt this escalator, by tying expressions of uncertainty to the propositions expressible in an agent’s language . But Bayesian epistemology comes in three main varieties. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Kendall D'Andrade (1986). How Badly Do We Need Theory Z? Journal of Business Ethics 5 (3):219 - 223.score: 624.0
    In Theory Z-style management everybody participates in corporate decision making. This more open process should give us fewer Pintos, Love Canals, and massive international payoffs as executives are forced to expose their reasoning to the moral sensibilities of the whole corporation. So far everything looks good. But we are a long way from showing that only corporations so managed can be fully moral. Yet Dwiggins seems to believe this, putting his faith in the basic goodness of the many while (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Geert Keil (2001). How Do We Ever Get Up? On the Proximate Causation of Actions and Events. Grazer Philosophische Studien 61 (1):43-62.score: 612.0
    Many candidates have been tried out as proximate causes of actions: belief-desire pairs, volitions, motives, intentions, and other kinds of pro-attitudes. None of these mental states or events, however, seems to be able to do the trick, that is, to get things going. Each of them may occur without an appropriate action ensuing. After reviewing several attempts at closing the alleged “causal gap”, it is argued that on a correct analysis, there is no missing link waiting to be discovered. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Joseph Millum (2010). How Do We Acquire Parental Rights? Social Theory and Practice 36 (1):112-132.score: 612.0
    In this paper I develop a theory of the acquisition of parental rights that can help us make these judgments. According to this investment theory, parental rights are generated by the performance of parental work. Thus, those who successfully parent a child have the right to continue to do so, and to exclude others from so doing. The account derives from a more general principle of desert that applies outside the domain of parenthood. It also has some interesting implications (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Alan Randall, We Already Have Risk Management – Do We Really Need the Precautionary Principle?score: 612.0
    The precautionary principle (PP) is fundamentally a claim that acting to avoid and/or mitigate threats of serious harm should be accorded high priority in public policy. Over the last three decades, governments and international bodies have endorsed it in principle, and some of them have incorporated it into some areas of policy practice. Yet, PP is controversial in policy circles, public discussion and scholarly discourse. Here the PP literature is reviewed from the perspective of economics, where the tendency (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Joseph Millum (2008). How Do We Acquire Parental Responsibilities? Social Theory and Practice 34 (1):71-93.score: 612.0
    It is commonly believed that parents have special duties toward their children—weightier duties than they owe other children. How these duties are acquired, however, is not well understood. This is problematic when claims about parental responsibilities are challenged; for example, when people deny that they are morally responsible for their biological offspring. In this paper I present a theory of the origins of parental responsibilities that can resolve such cases of disputed moral parenthood.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Lothar Spillmann & John S. Werner (1998). How Do We See What is Not There? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):773-774.score: 612.0
    Pessoa et al. provide a valuable taxonomy of perceptual completion phenomena, but it is not yet clear whether these phenomena are mediated by one kind of neural mechanism or more. We suggest three possible neural mechanisms of long-range interaction to stimulate further perceptual and neurophysiological investigation of perceptual completion and filling-in.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Ibo van de Poel (2008). How Should We Do Nanoethics? A Network Approach for Discerning Ethical Issues in Nanotechnology. NanoEthics 2 (1):25-38.score: 588.0
    There is no agreement on how nanoethics should proceed. In this article I focus on approaches for discerning ethical issues in nanotechnology, which is as of yet one of the most difficult and urging tasks for nanoethics. I discuss and criticize two existing approaches for discerning ethical issues in nanotechnology and propose a network approach as alternative. I discuss debates in nanoethics about the desirable role of ethics in nanotechnological development and about the newness of ethical issues in nanotechnology. On (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Joachim Boldt (2013). Do We Have A Moral Obligation to Synthesize Organisms to Increase Biodiversity? On Kinship, Awe, and the Value of Life's Diversity. Bioethics 27 (8):411-418.score: 588.0
    Synthetic biology can be understood as expanding the abilities and aspirations of genetic engineering. Nonetheless, whereas genetic engineering has been subject to criticism due to its endangering biodiversity, synthetic biology may actually appear to prove advantageous for biodiversity. After all, one might claim, synthesizing novel forms of life increases the numbers of species present in nature and thus ought to be ethically recommended. Two perspectives on how to spell out the conception of intrinsic value of biodiversity are examined in order (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. G. Sereny (2011). How Do We Know That the Godel Sentence of a Consistent Theory Is True? Philosophia Mathematica 19 (1):47-73.score: 576.0
    Some earlier remarks Michael Dummett made on Gödel’s theorem have recently inspired attempts to formulate an alternative to the standard demonstration of the truth of the Gödel sentence. The idea underlying the non-standard approach is to treat the Gödel sentence as an ordinary arithmetical one. But the Gödel sentence is of a very specific nature. Consequently, the non-standard arguments are conceptually mistaken. In this paper, both the faulty arguments themselves and the general reasons underlying their failure are analysed. The (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Margaret C. Jacob (2014). How Radical Was the Enlightenment? What Do We Mean by Radical? Diametros 40:99-114.score: 576.0
    The Radical Enlightenment has been much discussed and its original meaning somewhat distorted. In 1981 my concept of the storm that unleashed a new, transnational intellectual movement possessed a strong contextual and political element that I believed, and still believe, to be critically important. Idealist accounts of enlightened ideas that divorce them from politics leave out the lived quality of the new radicalism born in reaction to monarchical and clerical absolutism. Taking the religious impulse seriously and working to defang it (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Georg Marckmann (2001). Teaching Science Vs. The Apprentice Model €“ Do We Really Have the Choice? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (1):85-89.score: 576.0
    The debate about the appropriate methodology of medical education has been (and still is) dominated by the opposing poles of teaching science versus teaching practical skills. I will argue that this conflict between scientific education and practical training has its roots in the underlying, more systematic question about the conceptual foundation of medicine: how far or in what respects can medicine be considered to be a science? By analyzing the epistemological status of medicine I will show that the internal aim (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Mary Ann Baily (2006). How Do We Avoid Compounding the Damage? American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):36 – 38.score: 576.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Margaret P. Wardlaw (2010). The Right-to-Die Exception: How the Discourse of Individual Rights Impoverishes Bioethical Discussions of Disability and What We Can Do About It. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):43-62.score: 552.0
    "Tell the health professionals why people with disabilities get depressed and suicidal. Tell them about institutions. Let them know the real reasons people with disabilities give up."The disability studies perspective has been consistently marginalized in twentieth-century American bioethical discourse. Like Ralph Ellison's nameless protagonist who is "invisible … simply because people refuse to see me" (Ellison 1995, 3), both disabled people and disability studies perspectives have been conspicuously absent from mainstream contemporary bioethical inquiries. Considerations of provision, accommodation, and institutionalization (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Richard Carlin (2004). A Sa Sometimes Folksinger, Folklorist, and Writer on Traditional Music, I Have Long Been Interested in How Folk Music is Judged. In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad Music: The Music We Love to Hate. Routledge. 173.score: 552.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Ronald Fischer, Rohan Callander, Paul Reddish & Joseph Bulbulia (2013). How Do Rituals Affect Cooperation? Human Nature 24 (2):115-125.score: 540.0
    Collective rituals have long puzzled anthropologists, yet little is known about how rituals affect participants. Our study investigated the effects of nine naturally occurring rituals on prosociality. We operationalized prosociality as (1) attitudes about fellow ritual participants and (2) decisions in a public goods game. The nine rituals varied in levels of synchrony and levels of sacred attribution. We found that rituals with synchronous body movements were more likely to enhance prosocial attitudes. We also found that rituals judged (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Ninni Wahlström (2010). Do We Need to Talk to Each Other? How the Concept of Experience Can Contribute to an Understanding of Bildung and Democracy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (3):293-309.score: 530.0
    In this article I argue that the contested concept of Bildung, with its roots in the late 18th century, remains of interest in the postmodern era, even if there is also certainly a debate about it having had its day. In the specific discussion about Bildung and democracy, I suggest that Dewey's reconstructed concept of experience has several points in common with a more recent understanding of Bildung, at the same time as it can provide insight into how democracy can (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Ralph Schumacher (2007). Do We Have to Be Realists About Colour in Order to Be Able to Attribute Colour Perceptions to Other Persons? Erkenntnis 66 (1-2):233 - 246.score: 513.0
    One of the main targets of Barry Stroud’s criticism in his recent book ‚The Quest for Reality. Subjectivism and the Metaphysics of Colour’ are eliminativist theories of colour which he regards as a version of the metaphysical project of the unmasking of colours (Stroud, 2000). According to this view, no physical objects have any of the colours we see them or believe them to have. However, although this error theory describes all our colour perceptions as illusory, and all (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Derek Michaud (2013). Personal Identity and Resurrection: How Do We Survive Our Death? Edited by Georg Gasser . Pp. Xvi, 277, Farnham, Ashgate, 2010, £55.00/$99.95. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (2):330-331.score: 507.6
    Book review of Georg Gasser, ed. “Personal Identity: How do we Survive Our Death?” (Ashgate, 2010).
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Tyler Cowen, How Do We Define the Feasible Set?score: 507.6
    How should we define the “feasible set”? What does it mean to assert that a policy is the “best feasible option”? Feasibility is most plausibly a matter of degree rather than of kind. We therefore must think about how to do normative economics with a fuzzy social budget constraint. I consider a number of ways of proceeding, including a twodimensional social welfare function, weighting both desirability and feasibility. Focusing on the difficulties in the feasibility concept may help us resolve some (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Arnold M. Ludwig (1997). How Do We Know Who We Are?: A Biography of the Self. Oxford University Press.score: 507.6
    "The terrain of the self is vast," notes renowned psychiatrist Arnold Ludwig, "parts known, parts impenetrable, and parts unexplored." How do we construct a sense of ourselves? How can a self reflect upon itself or deceive itself? Is all personal identity plagiarized? Is a "true" or "authentic" self even possible? Is it possible to really "know" someone else or ourselves for that matter? To answer these and many other intriguing questions, Ludwig takes a unique approach, examining the art of biography (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Erik Weber (1999). Unification: What is It, How Do We Reach and Why Do We Want It? Synthese 118 (3):479-499.score: 504.0
    This article has three aims. The first is to give a partial explication of the concept of unification. My explication will be partial because I confine myself to unification of particular events, because I do not consider events of a quantitative nature, and discuss only deductive cases. The second aim is to analyze how unification can be reached. My third aim is to show that unification is an intellectual benefit. Instead of being an intellectual benefit unification could be an intellectual (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Philippe Gagnon (2010). “What We Have Learnt From Systems Theory About the Things That Nature’s Understanding Achieves”. In Dirk Evers, Antje Jackelén & Taede Smedes (eds.), How do we Know? Understanding in Science and Theology. Forum Scientiarum.score: 489.6
    The problem of knowledge has been centred around the study of the content of our consciousness, seeing the world through internal representation, without any satisfactory account of the operations of nature that would be a pre-condition for our own performances in terms of concept efficiency in organizing action externally. If we want to better understand where and how meaning fits in nature, we have to find the proper way to decipher its organization, and account for the fact that we (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. David Kovacs (2009). Do We Have the End of Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus? Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:53-.score: 471.6
    The objections against the transmitted ending of OT (1424-1530) raised by scholars since the eighteenth century and most recently by R.D. Dawe deserve to be taken seriously, but only the last 63 lines (1468-1530, called B below) are open to truly serious objections, both verbal and dramaturgical. By contrast, objections against 1424-67 (called A below) are mostly slight, and in addition they are protected by an earlier passage in the play that seems to prepare the audience for Creon's demand that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. D. Strech (2010). How Factual Do We Want the Facts? Criteria for a Critical Appraisal of Empirical Research for Use in Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (4):222-225.score: 468.0
    Most contributions to the current debate about the consideration and application of empirical information in ethics scholarship deal with epistemological issues such as the role and the meaning of empirical research in ethical reasoning. Despite the increased publication of empirical data in ethics literature we still lack systematic analyses and conceptual frameworks that would help us to understand the rarely discussed methodological and practical problems in appraising empirical research. This paper demonstrates the need for critical appraisal and its crucial methodological (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Nick Bostrom (1998). How Long Before Superintelligence? International Journal of Futures Studies 2.score: 460.8
    _This paper outlines the case for believing that we will have superhuman artificial intelligence_ _within the first third of the next century. It looks at different estimates of the processing power of_ _the human brain; how long it will take until computer hardware achieve a similar performance;_ _ways of creating the software through bottom-up approaches like the one used by biological_ _brains; how difficult it will be for neuroscience figure out enough about how brains work to_ _make this (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Aaron Simmons (2009). Do Animals Have an Interest in Continued Life? Environmental Ethics 31 (4):375-392.score: 460.8
    Do we do anything wrong to animals simply by ending their lives if it causes them no pain or suffering? According to some, we can do no wrong to animals by killing them because animals do not have an interest in continued life. An attempt to ground an interest in continued life in animals’ desires faces the challenge that animals are supposedly incapable of desiring to live or of having the kinds of long-range desires which could be thwarted (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Miguel Garcia-Valdecasas (2013). Do Expectations Have Time Span? Axiomathes 23 (4):665-681.score: 460.8
    If it is possible to think that human life is temporal as a whole, and we can make sense of Wittgenstein’s claim that the psychological phenomena called ‘dispositions’ do not have genuine temporal duration on the basis of a distinction between dispositions and other mental processes, we need a compelling account of how time applies to these dispositions. I undertake this here by examining the concept of expectation, a disposition with a clear nexus to time by the temporal point (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000