Search results for 'Howard B. Gold' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Howard B. Gold (1977). Praxis. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 6 (1):106-130.score: 290.0
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  2. H. Mann, B. Djulbegovic & P. Gold (2003). Failure of Equipoise to Resolve the Ethical Tension in a Randomized Clinical Trial. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics: A Journal of the American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics 31 (1):5.score: 140.0
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  3. Jeffrey B. Gold (1978). The Ambiguity of 'Name' in Plato's 'Cratylus'. Philosophical Studies 34 (3):223 - 251.score: 120.0
    In the "cratylus", Plato presents two theories about the correctness of names, I.E., Names are correct by nature and names are correct by convention. In this paper, I argue that plato holds both views because he recognizes that the word 'name' is ambiguous as between type and token. Name tokens (individual strings of marks and noises) are conventional for plato. But name types (the role played by the tokens or the concept expressed by the tokens) are not conventional for plato.
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  4. Howard Mann, Benjamin Djulbegovic & Paul Gold (2003). Letter to the Editor. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (1):5-6.score: 120.0
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  5. Jason M. Gold, Allison B. Sekuler & Partrick J. Bennett (2004). Characterizing Perceptual Learning with External Noise. Cognitive Science 28 (2):167-207.score: 120.0
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  6. Frédéric Gosselin, Philippe G. Schyns, Dario Ringach, Robert Shapley, Jason M. Gold, Allison B. Sekuler, Partrick J. Bennett, Michael C. Mangini, Irving Biederman & Cheryl Olman (2004). Special Issue Rendering the Use of Visual Information From Spiking Neurons to Recognition a Picture is Worth Thousands of Trials: Rendering the Use of Visual Information From Spiking Neurons to Recognition 141. Cognitive Science 28:1035-1039.score: 120.0
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  7. Sarah E. Morris, Clay B. Holroyd, Monica C. Mann-Wrobel & James M. Gold (2011). Dissociation of Response and Feedback Negativity in Schizophrenia: Electrophysiological and Computational Evidence for a Deficit in the Representation of Value. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:123.score: 120.0
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  8. John P. Barron (1965). Carthaginian Coins G. K. Jenkins, R. B. Lewis: Carthaginian Gold and Electrum Coins. (Royal Numismatic Society, Special Publication No. 2.) Pp. 140; 38 Collotype Plates. London: Spink & Son, 1963. Cloth, £5. 5s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 15 (01):102-104.score: 36.0
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  9. Richard D. Mohr (1978). The Gold Analogy in Plato's "Timaeus" (50 a 4-B 5). Phronesis 23 (3):243 - 252.score: 36.0
  10. C. M. Kraay (1958). Theodore V. Buttrey: The Triumviral Portrait Gold of the Quattuorviri Monetales of 42 B.C. (Numismatic Notes and Monographs, No. 137.) Pp. X+69; 9 Plates. New York: American Numismatic Society, 1956. Paper, $2. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 8 (3-4):298-.score: 36.0
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  11. Richard D. Mohr (1978). The Gold A Nalogy in Plato's Timaeus (50 a 4 - B 5). Phronesis 23 (3):243-252.score: 36.0
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  12. Ruth Westgate (2007). Gold (B.K.), Donahue (J.F.) (Edd.) Roman Dining. A Special Issue of the American Journal of Philology. Pp. Xiv + 140, Pls. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005. Paper, £13.50, US$19.95. ISBN: 978-0-8018-8202-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (01):174-.score: 36.0
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  13. Ernst Dammann (1971). J. B. Dauquah: The Akan Doctrine of God. A Fragment of Gold Coast Ethics and Religion. Second Edition. With a New Introduction by Kwesi A. Dickson and Nine Illustrations by Kofi Antubam. Frank Cass and Co., London 1968, XXXVIII, 206 Pp. [REVIEW] Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 23 (4):377-378.score: 36.0
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  14. S. Prakash Sethi, David B. Lowry, Emre A. Veral, H. Jack Shapiro & Olga Emelianova (2011). Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold, Inc.: An Innovative Voluntary Code of Conduct to Protect Human Rights, Create Employment Opportunities, and Economic Development of the Indigenous People. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (1):1-30.score: 30.0
    Environmental degradation and extractive industry are inextricably linked, and the industry’s adverse impact on air, water, and ground resources has been exacerbated with increased demand for raw materials and their location in some of the more environmentally fragile areas of the world. Historically, companies have managed to control calls for regulation and improved, i.e., more expensive, mining technologies by (a) their importance in economic growth and job creation or (b) through adroit use of their economic power and bargaining leverage against (...)
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  15. Howard Brody (1988). Computerized Encounter Registers in Primary Care Research: Is There a Gold Standard? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 9 (2).score: 15.0
    Computer technology as well as the need to conduct research in primary care settings, has stimulated the creation in the U.S. of information networks linking private physicians' offices and other primary care practice sights. These networks give rise to several problems which have philosophic interest. One is a numerator problem created by the difficulty in primary care of using the more complicated or invasive diagnostic technologies commonly employed in tertiary care research. Another is a denominator problem arising from the difficulties (...)
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  16. Scott Soames (2006). Is H2O a Liquid, or Water a Gas? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (3):635-639.score: 12.0
    In Beyond Rigidity I argue that, like ‘red’, ‘water’ can be used both as a singular term, and (when combined with the copula) as a predicate – as illustrated by (1) and (2). 1a. Red is a color. b. Bill’s shirt is red. 2a. Unlike gold, which is an element, water is a compound. b. The liquid in (...)
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  17. Graham Harman (2011). Meillassoux's Virtual Future. Continent 1 (2):78-91.score: 12.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
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  18. Michael Root (2000). How We Divide the World. Philosophy of Science 67 (3):639.score: 12.0
    Real kinds or categories, according to conventional wisdom, enter into lawlike generalizations, while nominal kinds do not. Thus, gold but not jewelry is a real kind. However, by such a criterion, few if any kinds or systems of classification employed in the social science are real, for the social sciences offer, at best, only restricted generalizations. Thus, according to conventional wisdom, race and class are on a par with telephone area codes and postal zones; all are nominal rather than (...)
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  19. Mark Baltin, Implications of Pseudo-Gapping for Binding and the Representation of Information Structure* Mark R. Baltin.score: 12.0
    In addition to the standard ellipsis process known as VP-ellipsis, another ellipsis process, known as pseudo-gapping, was first brought to the fore-front in the 1970’s by Sag (1976) and N. Levin (1986). This process elides subparts of a VP, as in (1): (1) Although I don’t like steak, I do___pizza. Developing ideas of K.S. Jayaseelan (Jayaseelan (1990)), Howard Lasnik has developed an analysis in which pseudo-gapping, which, in some instances, looks as though it is simply deleting a verb, is (...)
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  20. Neil Manson, 14 Addiction and the Diagnostic Criteria for Pathological Gambling.score: 12.0
    A philosophical question divides the field of addiction research. Can a psychological disorder count as an addiction absent a common underlying physical basis (neurological or genetic) for every case of the disorder in the category? Or is it appropriate to categorize a disorder as an addiction if the symptoms of and diagnostic criteria for it are sufficiently similar to those of other disorders also classified as addictions—regardless of whether there is some underlying physical basis common to each case of the (...)
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  21. David B. Resnik (2010). Review of Who Owns You?: The Corporate Gold Rush to Patent Your Genes. [REVIEW] Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 4 (1).score: 12.0
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  22. Aaron Sloman (1982). Towards a Grammar of Emotions. New Universities Quarterly 36 (3):230-238.score: 12.0
    My favourite leading question when teaching Philosophy of Mind is ‘Could a goldfish long for its mother?’ This introduces the philosophical technique of ‘conceptual analysis’, essential for the study of mind (Sloman 1978, ch. 4). By analysing what we mean by ‘A longs for B’, and similar descriptions of emotional states we see that they inv olve rich cognitive structures and processes, i.e. computations. Anything which could long for its mother, would have to hav e some sort of representation of (...)
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  23. Daniel J. Nicholson & Richard Gawne (2013). Rethinking Woodger's Legacy in the Philosophy of Biology. Journal of the History of Biology:1-50.score: 12.0
    The writings of Joseph Henry Woodger (1894–1981) are often taken to exemplify everything that was wrongheaded, misguided, and just plain wrong with early twentieth-century philosophy of biology. Over the years, commentators have said of Woodger: (a) that he was a fervent logical empiricist who tried to impose the explanatory gold standards of physics onto biology, (b) that his philosophical work was completely disconnected from biological science, (c) that he possessed no scientific or philosophical credentials, and (d) that his work (...)
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  24. Francis Jeffry Pelletier (1974). On Some Proposals for the Semantics of Mass Nouns. Journal of Philosophical Logic 3 (1/2):87 - 108.score: 12.0
    Simple mass nouns are words like ‘water’, ‘furniture’ and ‘gold’. We can form complex mass noun phrases such as ‘dirty water’, ‘leaded gold’ and ‘green grass’. I do not propose to discuss the problems in giving a characterization of the words that are mass versus those that are not. For the purposes of this paper I shall make the following decrees: (a) nothing that is not a noun or noun phrase can be mass, (b) no abstract noun phrases (...)
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  25. Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2012). Cumposition: Theses on Philosophy's Etymology. Continent 2 (1).score: 12.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 44–55. Philosophers are sperm, poetry erupts sperm and dribbles, philosopher recodes term, to terminate, —A. Staley Groves 1 There is, in the relation of human languages to that of things, something that can be approximately described as “overnaming”—the deepest linguistic reason for all melancholy and (from the point of view of the thing) for all deliberate muteness. Overnaming as the linguistic being of melancholy points to another curious relation of language: the overprecision that obtains in the tragic (...)
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  26. Eugenio Benitez (2007). Philosophy, Myth and Plato's Two-Worlds View. The European Legacy 12 (2):225-242.score: 12.0
    This paper examines one aspect of the relation between philosophy and myth, namely the function myth has, for some philosophers, in narrowing the distance between appearance and reality. I distinguish this function of myth from other common functions, and also show how the approach to reality through myth differs from a more empirical philosophical approach. I argue that myth plays a fundamental role in Plato's approach to the appearance/reality distinction, and that understanding this is important to the interpretation of Plato's (...)
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  27. B. Berry (2001). Review: God and Gold in Late Antiquity. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (2):288-289.score: 12.0
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  28. J. B. Danquah (1968). The Akan Doctrine of God: A Fragment of Gold Coast Ethics and Religion. London, Cass.score: 12.0
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  29. J. P. Guepin, G. K. Jenkins & R. B. Lewis (1965). Carthaginian Gold and Electrum Coins. Journal of Hellenic Studies 85:248.score: 12.0
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  30. James M. Gold Sarah E. Morris, Clay B. Holroyd, Monica C. Mann-Wrobel (2011). Dissociation of Response and Feedback Negativity in Schizophrenia: Electrophysiological and Computational Evidence for a Deficit in the Representation of Value. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 12.0
    Contrasting theories of schizophrenia propose that the disorder is characterized by a deficit in phasic changes in dopamine activity in response to ongoing events or, alternatively, by a weakness in the representation of the value of responses. Schizophrenia patients have reliably reduced brain activity following incorrect responses but other research suggests that they may have intact feedback-related potentials, indicating that the impairment may be specifically response-related. We used event-related brain potentials and computational modeling to examine this issue by comparing the (...)
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  31. Peter J. Smail (1987). From Birth to Five. By N. R. Butler & J Golding. (Pergamon, Oxford, 1986.) £24.95 (Hardback), £14.95 (Paperback).The Health and Development of Children. Edited by H. B. Miles & Elizabeth Still. (Symposium No. 21, 1984, Eugenics Society, London.) £4.95. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 19 (4):506-507.score: 12.0
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  32. Eric Sunderland (1985). Clinical Anthropology: A New Approach to American Health Problems? Edited by D. B. Shimkin and Peggy Golde. Pp. Xxii + 456. (Lanham, New York; University Press of America, 1983.). [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 17 (4):504-505.score: 12.0
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  33. Harvey S. Smallman & Maia B. Cook (2011). Naïve Realism: Folk Fallacies in the Design and Use of Visual Displays. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (3):579-608.score: 6.0
    Often implicit in visual display design and development is a gold standard of photorealism. By approximating direct perception, photorealism appeals to users and designers by being both attractive and apparently effortless. The vexing result from numerous performance evaluations, though, is that increasing realism often impairs performance. Smallman and St. John (2005) labeled misplaced faith in realistic information display Naïve Realism and theorized it resulted from a triplet of folk fallacies about perception. Here, we illustrate issues associated with the wider (...)
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  34. Horace James Bridges (1926/1968). Aspects of Ethical Religion. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.score: 4.0
    Ethical mysticism, by S. Coit.--The ethical import of history, by D. S. Muzzey.--The tragic and heroic in life, by W. M. Salter.--Distinctive features of the ethical movement, by A. W. Martin.--Ethical experience as the basis of religious education, by H. Neumann.--"All men are created equal," by G. E. O'Dell.--How far is art an aid to religion? by P. Chubb.--Evolution and the uniqueness of man, by H. J. Bridges.--The spiritual outlook on life, by H. J. Golding.--The ethics of Abu'l Ala al (...)
     
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  35. Stephen R. Carpenter, Barbara J. Benson, Reinette Biggs, Jonathan W. Chipman, Jonathan A. Foley, Shaun A. Golding, Roger B. Hammer, Paul C. Hanson, Pieter Tj Johnson & Amy M. Kamarainen (2007). Understanding Regional Change: A Comparison of Two Lake Districts. Bioscience 57 (4):323-335.score: 4.0
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