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  1. Howard J. Curzer (2014). Tweaking the Four-Component Model. Journal of Moral Education 43 (1):104-123.
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  2. Howard J. Curzer (2013). When Bad Thoughts Happen to Good People: A Thought-Experiment. American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (1):83-92.
    Bernard Williams quotes Charles Fried's description of an emergency situation in which a man (call him Joe) must choose between helping his wife and helping a stranger. Famously, Williams goes on to remark, -/- It might have been hoped by some (for instance, by his wife) that his motivating thought, fully spelled out, would be the thought that it was his wife, not that it was his wife and that in situations of this kind it is permissible to save one's (...)
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  3. Howard J. Curzer, Mark Wallace & Gad Perry (2013). Environmental Research Ethics. Environmental Ethics 35 (1):95-114.
    Animal research in laboratories is currently informed by the three R’s (Replacement, Reduction, and Refinement), a common-sense theory of animal research ethics. In addition a fourth R (Refusal) is needed to address research plans that are so badly conceived that their chances of gaining any knowledge worth the animal suffering they cause are nil. Unfortunately, these four R’s do not always yield workable solutions to the moral problems faced regularly by wildlife researchers. It is possible to develop analogs in the (...)
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  4. Howard J. Curzer (2012). An Aristotelian Doctrine of the Mean in the Mencius? Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):53-62.
    Xiahui. While Confucius’ actions are intermediate between the actions of these three sages, the sages’ character traits do not bracket Confucius’ character traits. Instead, the failings of the three sages are skew to each other. Boyi lacks righteousness; Y i Yin lacks benevolence; and L iu Xiahui lacks wisdom. The comparison of the sages centers on the question of when to resign an advisory position. According to Mencius, one should resign only if one’s advice will not be heeded, or if (...)
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  5. Howard J. Curzer (2012). Aristotle and the Virtues. OUP Oxford.
    Aristotle is the father of virtue ethics--a discipline which is receiving renewed scholarly attention. Yet Aristotle's accounts of the individual virtues remain opaque, for most contemporary commentators of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics have focused upon other matters. In contrast, Howard J. Curzer takes Aristotle's detailed description of the individual virtues to be central to his ethical theory. Working through the Nicomachean Ethics virtue-by-virtue, explaining and generally defending Aristotle's claims, this book brings each of Aristotle's virtues alive. A new Aristotle emerges, an (...)
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  6. Howard J. Curzer (2012). Contemporary Rituals and the Confucian Tradition: A Critical Discussion. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):290-309.
    After defining what I mean by “rituals,” I list some benefits claimed for rituals by Confucians, but then go on to develop utilitarian, existentialist, liberal, radical, and Confucian critiques of rituals. (The Confucian critiques are particularly poignant. Rituals can hinder, rather than forward the goals of the Confucian tradition.) The drawbacks of rituals are not merely historical accidents; they grow out of essential features of rituals and are ineliminable. Yet there is hope. Because the drawbacks appear when rituals decay, they (...)
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  7. Howard J. Curzer (2011). Benevolent Government Now. Comparative Philosophy 3 (1).
    Mencian benevolent government intervenes dramatically in many ways in the marketplace in order to secure the material well-being of the population, especially the poor and disadvantaged. Mencius considers this sort of intervention to be appropriate not just occasionally when dealing with natural disasters, but regularly. Furthermore, Mencius recommends shifting from regressive to progressive taxes. He favors reduction of inequality so as to reduce corruption of government by the wealthy, and opposes punishment for people driven to crime by destitution. Mencius thinks (...)
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  8. Howard J. Curzer, Mark Wallace, Gad Perry, Peter Muhlberger & Dan Perry (2011). Teaching Wildlife Research Ethics. Teaching Ethics 12 (1):95-112.
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  9. Howard J. Curzer (2010). An Aristotelian Critique of the Traditional Family. American Philosophical Quarterly 47 (2):135.
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  10. Howard J. Curzer (2007). Aristotle: Founder of the Ethics of Care. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 41 (2-4):221-243.
    The title of this paper is meant to be provocative. The issue is not whether Carol Gilligan and Nel Noddings, who are usually credited with originating the ethics of care, build explicitly upon AristotleÕs work, or even whether Aristotle is a source of inspiration for them.1 Instead, the issue is whether Aristotle is an earlier advocate, perhaps the earliest advocate, of the ethics of care. Aristotle cannot be an ethics of care advocate without a concept of care, but Aristotle does (...)
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  11. Howard J. Curzer (2007). Abraham, the Faithless Moral Superhero. Philosophy and Literature 31 (2):344-361.
    Why do we admire Abraham1 so much? The standard answer is that Abraham’s faith in God is very great. Now in the context of Genesis, “faith in God” does not mean “belief in God’s existence.” Polytheism, not atheism, is the adversary in Genesis. Nor does “faith in God” mean “believing in order that we may come to understand God”2 or “believing because we cannot fully understand God”3 or “believing despite what we understand about God.”4 To minimize anachronism and controversy I (...)
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  12. Howard J. Curzer (2006). Admirable Immorality, Dirty Hands, Ticking Bombs, and Torturing Innocents. Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (1):31-56.
    Is torturing innocent people ever morally required? I rebut responses to the ticking-bomb dilemma by Slote, Williams, Walzer, and others. I argue that torturing is morally required and should be performed when it is the only way to avert disasters. In such situations, torturers act with dirty hands because torture, though required, is vicious. Conversely, refusers act wrongly, yet virtuously, thus displaying admirable immorality. Vicious, morally required acts and virtuous, morally wrong acts are odd, yet necessary to preserve the ticking-bomb (...)
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  13. Howard J. Curzer (2006). Aristotle's Mean Relative to Us. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (4):507-519.
    The article argues that Aristotle takes the mean to be relative neither to character nor to social role, but simply to the agent’s situation. The “character relativity” interpretation arises from the contemporary common-sense impulse to hold people who must overcome obstacles to a lower standard than people who easily act and feel rightly. However, character relativity vitiates Aristotle’s distinction between what moral people should do and what people should do to become moral. It also clashes with Aristotle’s principle that the (...)
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  14. Howard J. Curzer (2005). How Good People Do Bad Things: Aristotle on the Misdeeds of the Virtuous. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):233-256.
     
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  15. Howard J. Curzer (2004). The Ethics of Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (5):533 – 562.
    In this article I rebut conservative objections to five phases of embryonic stem cell research. I argue that researchers using existing embryonic stem cell lines are not complicit in the past destruction of embryos because beneficiaries of immoral acts are not necessary morally tainted. Second, such researchers do not encourage the destruction of additional embryos because fertility clinics presently destroy more spare embryos than researchers need. Third, actually harvesting stem cells from slated-to-be-discarded embryos is not wrong. The embryos are not (...)
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  16. Howard J. Curzer (2002). Admirable Immorality, Dirty Hands, Care Ethics, Justice Ethics, and Child Sacrifice. Ratio 15 (3):227–244.
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  17. Howard J. Curzer (2002). Aristotle on Courage. Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):205-207.
  18. Howard J. Curzer (2002). Aristotle's Painful Path to Virtue. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (2):141-162.
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  19. Howard J. Curzer (1999). Nature, Justice, and Rights in Aristotle's Politics. Ancient Philosophy 19 (2):430-436.
  20. Howard J. Curzer (1998). An Argument Inphysics II. Philosophia 26 (3-4):359-382.
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  21. Howard J. Curzer (1997). Aristotle's Account of the Virtue of Temperance in Nicomachean Ethics III.10-11. Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (1):5-25.
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  22. Howard J. Curzer (1997). From Duty, Moral Worth, Good Will. Dialogue 36 (02):287-.
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  23. Howard J. Curzer (1996). A Defense of Aristotle's Doctrine That Virtue Is a Mean. Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):129-138.
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  24. Howard J. Curzer (1996). Journals and Justice. Journal of Information Ethics 5 (2):39-53.
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  25. Howard J. Curzer (1996). Aristotle's Bad Advice About Becoming Good. Philosophy 71 (275):139 - 146.
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  26. Howard J. Curzer (1995). Aristotle's Account of the Virtue of Justice. Apeiron 28 (3):207 - 238.
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  27. Howard J. Curzer (1995). Aristotle on the Perfect Life, And: Practices of Reason: Aristotle's "Nicomachean Ethics" (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (1):162-164.
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  28. Howard J. Curzer (1995). Jonathan Barnes, Ed., The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (6):377-379.
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  29. Howard J. Curzer (1994). Withdrawal of Life-Support: Four Problems in Medical Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 15 (4):233-241.
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  30. Howard J. Curzer (1993). Fry's Concept of Care in Nursing Ethics. Hypatia 8 (3):174 - 183.
    Sara T. Fry maintains that care is a central concept for nursing ethics. This requires, among other things, that care is a virtue rather than a mode of being. But if care is a central virtue of ethics and medical ethics then the claim that care is a central concept for nursing ethics is trivial. Otherwise, it is implausible.
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  31. Howard J. Curzer (1993). Is Care a Virtue for Health Care Professionals? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (1):51-69.
    Care is widely thought to be a role virtue for health care professionals (HCPs). It is thought that in their professional capacity, HCPs should not only take care of their patients, but should also care for their patients. I argue against this thesis. First I show that the character trait of care causes serious problems both for caring HCPs and for cared-for patients. Then I show that benevolence plus caring action causes fewer and less serious problems. My surprising conclusion is (...)
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  32. Howard J. Curzer (1992). Do Physicians Make Too Much Money? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (1).
    The average net income of physicians in the USA is more than four times the average net income of people working in all domestic industries in the USA. When critics suggest that physicians make too much money, defenders typically appeal to the following four prominent principles of economic justice: Aristotle's Income Principle, the Free Market Principle, the Utilitarian Income Principle, and Rawls' Difference Principle. I shall show that no matter which of these four principles is assumed, the present high incomes (...)
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  33. Howard J. Curzer (1991). An Ambiguity in Parfit's Theory of Personal Identity. Ratio 4 (1):16-24.
    In Reasons and Persons Parfit vacillates between two views of personal identity. Both views have unpalatable consequences. According to one view, the question, "Is person A the same as person C?" is always empty. According to the other view, this question is empty only some of the time. The first view is elegant, but it has consequences which are counterintuitive and incompatible with Parfit's later claims. The second view is commonsensical, but its only coherent version is vulnerable to an argument (...)
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  34. Howard J. Curzer (1991). Aristotle's Much Maligned Megalopsychos. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 69 (2):131 – 151.
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  35. Howard J. Curzer (1991). The Supremely Happy Life in Aristotle's "Nicomachean Ethics". Apeiron 24 (1):47 - 69.
  36. Howard J. Curzer (1991). Two Varieties of Temperance in the Gorgias. International Philosophical Quarterly 31 (2):153-159.
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  37. Howard J. Curzer & Jacqueline Glover (1991). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (1).
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  38. Howard J. Curzer (1990). A Great Philosopher's Not so Great Account of Great Virtue: Aristotle's Treatment of 'Greatness of Soul'. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):517 - 537.
  39. Howard J. Curzer (1990). Criteria for Happiness in Nicomachean Ethics I 7 and X 6–8. Classical Quarterly 40 (02):421-.
  40. Daniel W. Graham, Paula Gottlieb, Howard J. Curzer & Yvon Lafrance (1990). APEIRON: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science. Apeiron 23 (2):87-119.
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