Search results for 'Hudson Turner' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Joohyung Lee, Vladimir Lifschitz & Hudson Turner, Nonmonotonic Causal Theories.score: 240.0
    cuted actions. It has been applied to several challenge problems in the theory of commonsense knowledge. We study the relationship between this formalism and other work on nonmonotonic reasoning and knowl-.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Edith L. B. Turner (1986). The Genesis of an Idea: Remembering Victor Turner. Zygon 21 (1):7-8.score: 180.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Yeager Hudson (1987). Response to Chrzan's “Hudson on 'Too Much' Evil”. International Philosophical Quarterly 27 (2):207-210.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Stephen P. Turner (2009). Public Sociology and Democratic Theory Stephen P. Turner. In Jeroen Van Bouwel (ed.), The Social Sciences and Democracy. Palgrave Macmillan. 165.score: 180.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Bryan S. Turner (2008). Review Article: Somaesthetics and the Critique of Cartesian Dualism Body Consciousness: A Philosophy of Mindfulness and Somaesthetics by Richard Shusterman Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008, Pp. 256, ISBN 978—0—521—67587—1 Paperback, $24.99 Reviewed by Bryan S. Turner, Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore. [REVIEW] Body and Society 14 (3):129-133.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Robert Hudson (2010). Carnap, the Principle of Tolerance, and Empiricism. Philosophy of Science 77 (3):341-358.score: 60.0
    Kurt Gödel criticizes Rudolf Carnap's conventionalism on the grounds that it relies on an empiricist admissibility condition, which, if applied, runs afoul of his second incompleteness theorem. Thomas Ricketts and Michael Friedman respond to Gödel's critique by denying that Carnap is committed to Gödel's admissibility criterion; in effect, they are denying that Carnap is committed to any empirical constraint in the application of his principle of tolerance. I argue in response that Carnap is indeed committed to an empirical requirement vis‐à‐vis (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Derek D. Turner (2007). Making Prehistory: Historical Science and the Scientific Realism Debate. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Scientists often make surprising claims about things that no one can observe. In physics, chemistry, and molecular biology, scientists can at least experiment on those unobservable entities, but what about researchers in fields such as paleobiology and geology who study prehistory, where no such experimentation is possible? Do scientists discover facts about the distant past or do they, in some sense, make prehistory? Derek Turner argues that this problem has surprising and important consequences for the scientific realism debate. His (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Hud Hudson (2005). The Metaphysics of Hyperspace. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Hud Hudson offers a fascinating examination of philosophical reasons to believe in hyperspace. He explores non-theistic reasons in the first chapter and theistic ones towards the end; in the intervening sections he inquires into a variety of puzzles in the metaphysics of material objects that are either generated by the hypothesis of hyperspace or else informed by it, with discussions of receptacles, boundaries, contact, occupation, and superluminal motion. Anyone engaged with contemporary metaphysics, and many philosophers of religion, will (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jeremy Snyder, Valorie Crooks & Leigh Turner (2011). Issues and Challenges in Research on the Ethics of Medical Tourism: Reflections From a Conference. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):3-6.score: 60.0
    The authors co-organized (Snyder and Crooks) and gave a keynote presentation at (Turner) a conference on ethical issues in medical tourism. Medical tourism involves travel across international borders with the intention of receiving medical care. This care is typically paid for out-of-pocket and is motivated by an interest in cost savings and/or avoiding wait times for care in the patient’s home country. This practice raises numerous ethical concerns, including potentially exacerbating health inequities in destination and source countries and disrupting (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Mark Turner (1996). The Literary Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    We usually consider literary thinking to be peripheral and dispensable, an activity for specialists: poets, prophets, lunatics, and babysitters. Certainly we do not think it is the basis of the mind. We think of stories and parables from Aesop's Fables or The Thousand and One Nights, for example, as exotic tales set in strange lands, with spectacular images, talking animals, and fantastic plots--wonderful entertainments, often insightful, but well removed from logic and science, and entirely foreign to the world of everyday (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Stephen Turner (2012). Habermas Meets Science. Metascience 21 (2):419-423.score: 60.0
    Habermas meets science Content Type Journal Article Category Essay Review Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9560-2 Authors Stephen Turner, Department of Philosophy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Mark Turner (ed.) (2006). The Artful Mind: Cognitive Science and the Riddle of Human Creativity. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    All normal human beings alive in the last fifty thousand years appear to have possessed, in Mark Turner's phrase, "irrepressibly artful minds." Cognitively modern minds produced a staggering list of behavioral singularities--science, religion, mathematics, language, advanced tool use, decorative dress, dance, culture, art--that seems to indicate a mysterious and unexplained discontinuity between us and all other living things. This brute fact gives rise to some tantalizing questions: How did the artful mind emerge? What are the basic mental operations that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Stephen P. Turner (1994). The Social Theory of Practices: Tradition, Tacit Knowledge, and Presuppositions. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    The concept of "practices"--whether of representation, of political or scientific traditions, or of organizational culture--is central to social theory. In this book, Stephen Turner presents the first analysis and critique of the idea of practice as it has developed in the various theoretical traditions of the social sciences and the humanities. Understood broadly as a tacit understanding "shared" by a group, the concept of a practice has a fatal difficulty, Turner argues: there is no plausible mechanism by which (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Frederick Turner (ed.) (1999). Shakespeare's Twenty-First Century Economics: The Morality of Love and Money. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    Based on the proven maxim that "money makes the world go round", this study, drawing from Shakespeare's texts, presents a lexicon of common words as well as a variety of familiar familial and cultural sitations in an economic context. Making constant recourse to well-known material from Shakespeare's plays, Turner demonstrates that terms of money and value permeate our minds and lives even in our most mundane moments. His book offers a new, humane, evolutionary economics that fully expresses the moral, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. James Grantham Turner (2003). Schooling Sex: Libertine Literature and Erotic Education in Italy, France, and England 1534-1685. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    How did Casanova learn the theory of sex? Why did male pornographers write in the characters of women? What happens when philosophers take sexuality seriously and the sex-writers present their outrageous fantasies as an educational, philosophical quest? -/- Schooling Sex is the first full history of early modern libertine literature and its reception, from Aretino and Tullia d'Aragona in 16th century Italy to Pepys, Rochester, and Behn in late 17th century England. James Turner explores the idea of sexual education, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Robert Hudson (2013). Seeing Things: The Philosophy of Reliable Observation. Oup Usa.score: 60.0
    In Seeing Things, Robert Hudson argues that robustness reasoning lacks the special value it is often claimed to have. Robustness reasoning claims that an observation report is more likely to be true if the report is produced by multiple, independent sources.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. J. Scott Turner (2012). The Thermodynamics of Life. Metascience 21 (2):371-373.score: 60.0
    The thermodynamics of life Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s11016-012-9651-8 Authors J. Scott Turner, SUNY, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Raymond Turner (2009). Computable Models. Springer.score: 60.0
    Raymond Turner first provides a logical framework for specification and the design of specification languages, then uses this framework to introduce and study ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Chris Fox & Raymond Turner (2012). In Defence of Axiomatic Semantics. In Piotr Stalmaszcyzk (ed.), Philosophical and Formal Approaches to Linguistic Analysis. Ontos Verlag. 145.score: 60.0
    We may wonder about the status of logical accounts of the meaning of language. When does a particular proposal count as a theory? How do we judge a theory to be correct? What criteria can we use to decide whether one theory is “better” than another? Implicitly, many accounts attribute a foundational status to set theory, and set-theoretic characterisations of possible worlds in particular. The goal of a semantic theory is then to find a translation of the phenomena of interest (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Denys Turner (2004). Faith, Reason, and the Existence of God. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Denys Turner argues that there are reasons of faith why the existence of God should be thought rationally demonstrable and that it is worthwhile revisiting the theology of Thomas Aquinas to see why. The proposition that the existence of God is demonstrable by rational argument is doubted by nearly all philosophical opinion today and is thought by most Christian theologians to be incompatible with Christian faith. Turner's robust challenge to the prevailing orthodoxies will be of interest to believers (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Jason Turner (2010). Ontological Pluralism. Journal of Philosophy 107 (1):5-34.score: 30.0
    Ontological Pluralism is the view that there are different modes, ways, or kinds of being. In this paper, I characterize the view more fully (drawing on some recent work by Kris McDaniel) and then defend the view against a number of arguments. (All of the arguments I can think of against it, anyway.).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Eddy Nahmias, Stephen G. Morris, Thomas Nadelhoffer & Jason Turner (2006). Is Incompatibilism Intuitive? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (1):28 - 53.score: 30.0
    Incompatibilists believe free will is impossible if determinism is true, and they often claim that this view is supported by ordinary intuitions. We challenge the claim that incompatibilism is intuitive to most laypersons and discuss the significance of this challenge to the free will debate. After explaining why incompatibilists should want their view to accord with pretheoretical intuitions, we suggest that determining whether incompatibilism is in fact intuitive calls for empirical testing. We then present the results of our studies, which (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Peter W. Ross & Dale Turner (forthcoming). Problems of Existence in Philosophy and Science. Synthese.score: 30.0
    We initially characterize what we’ll call existence problems as problems where there is evidence that a putative entity exists and this evidence is not easily dismissed; however, the evidence is not adequate to justify the claim that the entity exists, and in particular the entity hasn’t been detected. The putative entity is elusive. We then offer a strategy for determining whether an existence problem is philosophical or scientific. According to this strategy (1) existence problems are characterized in terms of causal (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Hud Hudson (2007). Simples and Gunk. Philosophy Compass 2 (2):291–302.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Robert G. Hudson (2000). Perceiving Empirical Objects Directly. Erkenntnis 52 (3):357-371.score: 30.0
    The goal of this paper is to defend the claim that there is such a thing as direct perception, where by ‘direct perception’ I mean perception unmediated by theorizing or concepts. The basis for my defense is a general philosophic perspective which I call ‘empiricist philosophy’. In brief, empiricist philosophy (as I have defined it) is untenable without the occurrence of direct perception. It is untenable without direct perception because, otherwise, one can't escape the hermeneutic circle, as this phrase is (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Eddy A. Nahmias, Stephen G. Morris, Thomas Nadelhoffer & Jason Turner (2005). Surveying Freedom: Folk Intuitions About Free Will and Moral Responsibility. Philosophical Psychology 18 (5):561-584.score: 30.0
    Philosophers working in the nascent field of ‘experimental philosophy’ have begun using methods borrowed from psychology to collect data about folk intuitions concerning debates ranging from action theory to ethics to epistemology. In this paper we present the results of our attempts to apply this approach to the free will debate, in which philosophers on opposing sides claim that their view best accounts for and accords with folk intuitions. After discussing the motivation for such research, we describe our methodology of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Barbara Hudson (2003). Understanding Justice: An Introduction to Ideas, Perspectives, and Controversies in Modern Penal Theory. Open University Press.score: 30.0
    * Why should offenders be punished - what should punishments be designed to achieve? * Why has imprisonment become the normal punishment for crime in modern industrial societies? * What is the relationship between theories of punishment and the actual penalties inflicted on offenders? This revised and updated edition of a highly successful text provides a comprehensive account of the ideas and controversies that have arisen within law, philosophy, sociology and criminology about the punishment of criminals. Written in a clear, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Hud Hudson (1997). Brute Facts. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 75 (1):77 – 82.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Stephen P. Turner & Mark W. Risjord (eds.) (2007). Philosophy of Anthropology and Sociology. Elsevier.score: 30.0
    This volume concerns philosophical issues that arise from the practice of anthropology and sociology. The essays cover a wide range of issues, including traditional questions in the philosophy of social science as well as those specific to these disciplines. Authors attend to the historical development of the current debates and set the stage for future work. · Comprehensive survey of philosophical issues in anthropology and sociology · Historical discussion of important debates · Applications to current research in anthropology and sociology.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Eddy Nahmias, Stephen G. Morris, Thomas Nadelhoffer & Jason Turner (2004). The Phenomenology of Free Will. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (7-8):162-179.score: 30.0
    Philosophers often suggest that their theories of free will are supported by our phenomenology. Just as their theories conflict, their descriptions of the phenomenology of free will often conflict as well. We suggest that this should motivate an effort to study the phenomenology of free will in a more systematic way that goes beyond merely the introspective reports of the philosophers themselves. After presenting three disputes about the phenomenology of free will, we survey the (limited) psychological research on the experiences (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jason Turner (2010). Fitting Attitudes de Dicto and de Se. Noûs 44 (1):1-9.score: 30.0
    The Property Theory of attitudes holds that the contents of mental states --- especially de se states --- are properties. The "nonexistence problem" for the Property Theory holds that the theory gives the wrong consequences as to which worlds "fit" which mental states: which worlds satisfy desires, make beliefs true, and so on. If I desire to not exist, since there is no world where I have the property of not existing, my desire is satisfied in no worlds. In this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Hud Hudson (2001). A Materialist Metaphysics of the Human Person. Cornell University Press.score: 30.0
    Introduction In the first four chapters of this book, I develop and defend a monistic account of human persons according to which human persons are highly ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Gennaro Chierchia & Raymond Turner (1988). Semantics and Property Theory. Linguistics and Philosophy 11 (3):261 - 302.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Hud Hudson (2007). Safety. Analysis 67 (296):299–301.score: 30.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Gilles Fauconnier & Mark Turner, Polysemy and Conceptual Blending.score: 30.0
    In this article, we look at some aspects of polysemy which derive from the power of meaning potential. More specifically, we focus on aspects linked to the operation of conceptual blending, a major cognitive resource for creativity in many of its manifestations.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Stephen P. Turner (2007). Explaining Normativity. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (1):57-73.score: 30.0
    In this reply, I raise some questions about the account of "normativity" given by Joseph Rouse. I discuss the historical form of disputes over normativity in such thinkers as Kelsen and show that the standard issue with these accounts is over the question of whether there is anything added to the normal stream of explanation by the problem of normativity. I suggest that Rouse’s attempt to avoid the issues that arise with substantive explanatory theories of practices of the kind criticized (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Hud Hudson (2008). Précis of the Metaphysics of Hyperspace. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (2):422–426.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. H. Hudson (1943). The Value of Metaphysics. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 21 (1):1 – 9.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Hud Hudson (2002). Moving Faster Than Light. Analysis 62 (3):203–205.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Hud Hudson (2000). Universalism, Four Dimensionalism, and Vagueness. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (3):547-560.score: 30.0
    Anyone who endorses Universalism and Four Dimensionalism owes us an argument for those controversial mereological theses. One may put forth David Lewis’s and Ted Sider’s arguments from vagueness. However, the success of those arguments depends on the rejection of the epistemic view of vagueness, and thus opens the door to a fatal confrontation with one particularly troubling version of The Problem of the Many. The alternative for friends of Universalism and Four Dimensionalism is to abandon those currently fashionable arguments in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Hud Hudson (2008). Reply to Parsons, Reply to Heller, and Reply to Rea. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (2):452–470.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Julian Barling, Amy Christie & Nick Turner (2008). Pseudo-Transformational Leadership: Towards the Development and Test of a Model. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):851 - 861.score: 30.0
    We develop and test a model of pseudo-transformational leadership. Pseudo-transformational leadership (i.e., the unethical facet of transformational leadership) is manifested by a particular combination of transformational leadership behaviors (i.e., low idealized influence and high inspirational motivation), and is differentiated from both transformational leadership (i.e., high idealized influence and high inspirational motivation) and laissez-faire (non)-leadership (i.e., low idealized influence and low inspirational motivation). Survey data from senior managers (N = 611) show differential outcomes of transformational, pseudo-transformational, and laissez-faire leadership. Possible (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Stephen P. Turner (2009). Can There Be a Pragmatist Philosophy of Social Science? [REVIEW] Human Studies 32 (3):365 - 374.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Jason Turner, Debunking the Skeptics.score: 30.0
    is not about traditional skeptical thinkers like Descartes and Hume. Instead, it is about some of the ideas of today’s ”skeptics” — people who try to debunk things that seem too odd or too spiritual. This site is not meant to encourage weird beliefs, but it might make you wonder whether skepticism is a weird belief too.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Hud Hudson (1993). Collective Responsibility and Moral Vegetarianism. Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (2):89-104.score: 30.0
  46. W. D. Hudson (1964). Hume on is and Ought. Philosophical Quarterly 14 (56):246-252.score: 30.0
  47. Peter W. Ross & Dale Turner (2005). Sensibility Theory and Conservative Complancency. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (4):544–555.score: 30.0
    In Ruling Passions, Simon Blackburn contends that we should reject sensibility theory because it serves to support a conservative complacency. Blackburn's strategy is attractive in that it seeks to win this metaethical dispute – which ultimately stems from a deep disagreement over antireductionism – on the basis of an uncontroversial normative consideration. Therefore, Blackburn seems to offer an easy solution to an apparently intractable debate. We will show, however, that Blackburn's argument against sensibility theory does not succeed; it is no (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Hud Hudson (2006). Confining Composition. Journal of Philosophy 103 (12):631-651.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Stephen D. Hudson & Douglas N. Husak (1980). Legal Rights: How Useful is Hohfeldian Analysis? Philosophical Studies 37 (1):45 - 53.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. H. Hudson (1973). Wittgenstein and Zen Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 23 (4):471-481.score: 30.0
1 — 50 / 1000