101 found
Order:
Disambiguations:
Hugh S. Chandler [59]Hugh Chandler [42]Hugh Storer Chandler [1]
See also:
Profile: Hugh Chandler (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)
  1. Hugh Chandler, Augustine's Argument for the Existence of God.
    Roughly speaking, Augustine claims that ‘Immutable Truth’ is superior to the human mind and, consequently a legitimate candidate for the role of God. Clearly there is such a thing as Immutable Truth. So either that is God, or there is something superior to Immutable Truth, and that superior thing is God. I spell out this argument, and offer some objections to it.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Hugh S. Chandler, Martha Nussbaum and Alcibiades.
    Nussbaum seems to have had a spell during which she made villains heroes (and sometimes visa versa). Thus she has argued, in effect, that Steerforth is the hero of David Copperfield, and Heathcliff the most admirable character in Wuthering Heights. Here I discuss her more or less explicit claim that Alcibiades is the hero, (and Socrates the villain) in Plato’s Symposium. -/- .
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Hugh Chandler, Contingent Apriori Truths.
    This paper attempts to show that Scott Soames has not given us an example of a contingent a priori truth. (What it probably shows is how confused I am on this topic.).
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Hugh Chandler, Plato's Prime Mover Argument.
    In Laws book X Plato tries to give us conclusive evidence that there are at least two gods (one good and the other bad). The reasoning depends crucially on the idea of ‘self moving motion.’ In this paper I try to show that the ‘evidence’ is not persuasive. (Nevertheless, the idea of ‘self – moving motion is interesting.).
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Hugh S. Chandler, Parfit on Division.
    Parfit’s well known book, Reasons and Persons, argues, among other things, that ‘what matters’ in regard to ‘survival’ is not personal identity but something he calls ‘relation R.’ On this basis, plus other considerations, he rejects the ‘Self-interest’ theory as to what should be our aim in life. Here I show, or try to show, that his over-all argument is seriously defective. In particular, he fails to prove that personal identity is not what matters for survival.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Hugh S. Chandler (1976). Plantinga and the Contingently Possible. Analysis 36 (2):106 - 109.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  7. Hugh S. Chandler, Plantinga's Christian Epistemology.
    Plantinga claims that, at least for some people, the belief that God exists is ‘properly basic,’ or rather that they have properly basic beliefs that entail the existence of God. I think the underlying idea here is that we all have a properly working sensus divinitatus. This guarantees the existence of God. But, of course, if God does not exist, then our sensus divinitatus is not working properly, i.e. is not, really a sensus divinitatus. The issue as to whether there (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Hugh Chandler, Paley's 'Proof' of the Existence of God.
    Paley’s ‘proof’ of the existence of God, or some supposed version of it, is well known. In this paper I offer the real thing and two objections to it. One objection is Hume's, and the other is provided by Darwin.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  83
    Hugh Chandler, Does God Necessarly Exist?
    If God necessarily exists this has some interesting consequences. In this little note I mention some of these.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Hugh Chandler, The Monologion Argument for the Existence and Supremacy of God.
    In the first two chapters of the Monologion Anselm shows, or tries to show that “Of all the things that exist, there is one that is the best, greatest and supreme.” In this paper I examine his argument.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Hugh Chandler, Aristippus.
    Aristippus’ theory is, surely, one of the first genuinely ‘philosophical’ theories of ethics. He advocates pursuing immediate pleasure and avoiding immediate pain. This doctrine evoked vigorous attacks from such notables as Plato and Aristotle. Here I consider some of those early arguments.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Hugh S. Chandler, Putnam on Realism.
    In 1974 Putnam was a ‘realist’ in regard to the physical world. By 1981 he had become a 'non-realist' in this regard. (I don’t know where he stands today.) In this paper I argue that his realism was more plausible than his non-realism. The physical world is what it is independently of any rational being’s interpretation of it.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Hugh S. Chandler (1975). Rigid Designation. Journal of Philosophy 72 (13):363-369.
    I have been told that for some twenty minutes after reading this paper Kripke believed I had shown that proper names could be non-rigid designators. (Then, apparently, he found a crucial error in the set-up.) I take great pride in this (alleged) fact.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  14. Hugh Chandler, Can There Be Conflict Between Conscience and Self-Love?
    Ethical dualists hold that we have good reason to pursue our own happiness and good reason to pursue moral goodness. It would seem that there is a potential conflict here. On the other hand there have been those who deny even the possibility of conflict, whether or not there is a God and an afterlife. Rawls seems to say, or hint, that this was Butlers’ view, and Kant, according to at least one person, argued that there cannot be conflict here. (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Hugh Chandler (2010). Wittgenstein on the Resurrection. Philosophical Investigations 33 (4):321-338.
    Wittgenstein probably did not believe in Christ's Resurrection (as an historical event), but he may well have believed that if he had achieved a higher level of devoutness he would believe it. His view seems to have been that devout Christians are right in holding onto this belief tenaciously even though, in fact, it's false. It's historical falsity, is compatible with its religious validity, so to speak. So far as I can see, he did not think that devout Christians should (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Hugh S. Chandler, How Many Minds?
    In Analysis, Vol. 45, June 1984, George Rea published a paper attacking my claim that there could be ‘indeterminate minds'. This paper is a reply to his attack. I claim, again, that such ‘minds’ are possible – entities such that it is indeterminate whether or not these entities are people with minds. -/- .
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  69
    Hugh Chandler, Some Remarks on Hills's The Beloved Self.
    Here are a few remarks in regard to the first section of Alison Hills’s The Beloved Self. The topic is various forms of ‘Egoism.’ These are taken to be theories of practical reason – alternative answers to the question ‘what have I reason to do?’.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  78
    Hugh Chandler, Personal God or Something Greater.
    Alvin Plantinga says that according to classical Muslim, Jewish, and Christian belief, God is a person. (He spells out some of the characteristics of people as such.) In this rather messy little note I try to show that some of the best, most influential, Christian theologians, prior to the Reformation, did not think that God is literally a person (in Plantinga’s sense). In particular I focus on Anselm.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Hugh S. Chandler, Fuzzy Cooky-Cutter Classes.
    It seems clear that second order fuzziness (indeterminacy) is possible. There can be borderline cases of borderline cases. But how about third order cases? Is there no end of degrees of borderlinehood? I offer a somewhat strange little 'language game' that seems to suggest that the ascension ends with second order cases. (The 'game' is intended to be somewhat like a simplified version of color perception.).
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Hugh Chandler, Aristippus.
    This was an early chapter of what was later turned out to be a very different book. It sketches Aristippus’ theory of ethics and some of the arguments offered by others (e.g. Plato and Aristotle) in opposition to that theory.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  85
    Hugh S. Chandler (1993). Some Ontological Arguments. Faith and Philosophy 10 (Jan):18-180.
    This was an attempt to show what is wrong with Anselm’s ‘Ontological Argument’ for the existence of God. My present view is that Peter Millican has given us a similar, but much better line of attack in his “The One Fatal Flaw….” Paper.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  85
    Hugh S. Chandler (1966). Essence and Accident. Analysis 6 (6):77-81.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  79
    Hugh Chandler (1985). Indeterminate People. Analysis 45 (3):141-145.
    Here is the paper that was attacked by George Rea in his “How many minds…?” paper. Has this issue been resolved? Can there be entities such that there is no definite answer to the question “Are there 13 minds at work here, or 14?” -/- .
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Hugh S. Chandler, How Many Minds?
    In Analysis, Vol. 45, June 1984, George Rea published a paper attacking my claim that there could be ‘indeterminate people'. This paper is a reply to his attack. I claim, again, that such ‘people’ are possible – entities such that it is indeterminate whether or not these entities are people. -/- .
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  73
    Hugh S. Chandler (1984). Theseus' Clothes-Pin. Analysis 44 (2):55 - 58.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  84
    Hugh Chandler, The Problem of Good.
    -/- Very few (if any) people believe that the world was created, and is maintained, by a thoroughly contemptible and malicious being. Do we have good reason for our disbelief? In the first part of this paper I offer an argument for the non-existence of such a being. According to this argument there is just too much good - too may good things - in the world for the ‘malicious being’ theory to be plausible. In the second part of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  46
    Hugh S. Chandler (1971). Constitutivity and Identity. Noûs 5 (3):313-319.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  28.  68
    Hugh S. Chandler (1967). Excluded Middle. Journal of Philosophy 64 (24):807-814.
    This is a paper on borderline cases and the law of Excluded Middle. In it I try to make use of some long forgotten, but perhaps valuable, work on the topic – a bit of Hegel for instance.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  2
    Hugh S. Chandler & J. N. Findlay (1968). The Discipline of the Cave. Philosophical Review 77 (1):118.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  40
    Hugh S. Chandler (1986). Sources of Essence. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 11 (1):379-389.
    Almost everyone believes in modality de dicto. Necessarily, puppies are young dogs. The necessity here derives from the meaning of “puppy.” The term means young dog. Essentialism is belief in a more exotic sort of modality, one that does not derive from meaning in this direct and simple way. In the first two sections of this paper, I consider indexical and nonindexical kind terms and the sort of modality applicable to each. In the last section, I consider individuals and proper (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  36
    Hugh S. Chandler (1966). Three Kinds of Classses. American Philosophical Quarterly 3 (Jan):77-188.
    This is a boiled down version of my doctoral dissertation. Ryle wouldn’t publish it, claiming that it is like ‘a well sharpened pencil that no one will ever use.’ I guess he turned out to be right. Nevertheless I think it was, and is, a good paper.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  33
    Hugh S. Chandler (1975). Hedonism. American Philosophical Quarterly 12 (3):223-233.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  41
    Hugh S. Chandler (1969). Shoemaker's Arguments Against Locke. Philosophical Quarterly 19 (76):263-265.
  34.  24
    Hugh S. Chandler (1993). Divine Intervention and the Origin of Life. Faith and Philosophy 10 (2):pp. 259-161.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  20
    Hugh S. Chandler (1987). Cartesian Semantics. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):63-70.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  18
    Hugh S. Chandler (1970). Defending Continuants. Noûs 4 (3):279-283.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37.  28
    Hugh S. Chandler (1971). A Note in Defense of Personal Materialism. Philosophical Studies 22 (4):61 - 64.
  38.  17
    Hugh S. Chandler (1968). Persons and Predicability. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 46 (2):112 – 116.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  16
    Hugh Chandler (1993). Some Ontological Arguments. Faith and Philosophy 10 (1):18-32.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  20
    Hugh S. Chandler (1985). Book Review:God, Free Will, and Morality. Robert J. Richman. [REVIEW] Ethics 95 (3):743-.
  41.  10
    Hugh S. Chandler (1969). Butler on Bodies. American Philosophical Quarterly 6 (1):84 - 87.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  10
    Hugh S. Chandler (1968). Taylor's Incompatibility Argument. Dialogue 7 (2):273-277.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  12
    Hugh S. Chandler (1978). What is Wrong with the Addition of an Alternate? Philosophical Quarterly 28 (110):31-36.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  12
    Hugh S. Chandler (1987). Cook's Reductionis. Philosophia 17 (4):509-515.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  7
    Hugh S. Chandler (1968). Logical Continuity. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 9 (4):325-328.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  3
    Hugh S. Chandler (1966). -≫Three Kinds of Classes. American Philosophical Quarterly 3 (No. 1):77-81.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Hugh Chandler, Aristippus.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Hugh Chandler, Aristippus.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Hugh Chandler, Aristippus.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Hugh Chandler, Aristippus & Others.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 101