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Profile: Hugh Chandler (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)
  1. Hugh Chandler, Aristippus.
    Aristippus’ theory is, surely, one of the first genuinely ‘philosophical’ theories of ethics. He advocates pursuing immediate pleasure and avoiding immediate pain. This doctrine evoked vigorous attacks from such notables as Plato and Aristotle. Here I consider some of those early arguments.
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  2. Hugh Chandler, Augustine's Argument for the Existence of God.
    Roughly speaking, Augustine claims that ‘Immutable Truth’ is superior to the human mind and, consequently a legitimate candidate for the role of God. Clearly there is such a thing as Immutable Truth. So either that is God, or there is something superior to Immutable Truth, and that superior thing is God. I spell out this argument, and offer some objections to it.
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  3. Hugh Chandler, Aristippus & Others.
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  4. Hugh Chandler, Contingent Apriori Truths.
    This paper attempts to show that Scott Soames has not given us an example of a contingent a priori truth. (What it probably shows is how confused I am on this topic.).
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  5. Hugh Chandler, Can There Be Conflict Between Conscience and Self-Love?
    Ethical dualists hold that we have good reason to pursue our own happiness and good reason to pursue moral goodness. It would seem that there is a potential conflict here. On the other hand there have been those who deny even the possibility of conflict, whether or not there is a God and an afterlife. Rawls seems to say, or hint, that this was Butlers’ view, and Kant, according to at least one person, argued that there cannot be conflict here. (...)
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  6. Hugh Chandler, Can There Be Conflict?
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  7. Hugh Chandler, Does God Necessarly Exist?
    If God necessarily exists this has some interesting consequences. In this little note I mention some of these.
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  8. Hugh Chandler, -≫Fuzzy Minds.
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  9. Hugh Chandler, Philo and the Trinity.
    Philo, a Jewish philosopher, is interesting for various reasons. For one thing, he was a contemporary of Jesus who was deeply interested in all things related to religion but apparently never heard of Jesus. For another his view of God presumably shows one (radical, but possible) set of ideas about God available at that time.
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  10. Hugh Chandler, Personal God or Something Greater.
    Alvin Plantinga says that according to classical Muslim, Jewish, and Christian belief, God is a person. (He spells out some of the characteristics of people as such.) In this rather messy little note I try to show that some of the best, most influential, Christian theologians, prior to the Reformation, did not think that God is literally a person (in Plantinga’s sense). In particular I focus on Anselm.
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  11. Hugh Chandler, Personal God or Something Greater?
    Alvin Plantinga says that according to classical Muslim, Jewish, and Christian belief, God is a person. (He spells out some of the characteristics of people as such.) In this rather messy little note I try to show that some of the best, most influential, Christian theologians, prior to the Reformation, did not think that God is literally a person (in Plantinga’s sense). In particular I focus on Anselm. -/- .
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  12. Hugh Chandler, Plato's Prime Mover Argument.
    In Laws book X Plato tries to give us conclusive evidence that there are at least two gods (one good and the other bad). The reasoning depends crucially on the idea of ‘self moving motion.’ In this paper I try to show that the ‘evidence’ is not persuasive. (Nevertheless, the idea of ‘self – moving motion is interesting.).
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  13. Hugh Chandler, Paley's 'Proof' of the Existence of God.
    Paley’s ‘proof’ of the existence of God, or some supposed version of it, is well known. In this paper I offer the real thing and two objections to it. One objection is my own, and the other is provided by Darwin.
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  14. Hugh Chandler, Some Remarks on Hills's The Beloved Self.
    Here are a few remarks in regard to the first section of Alison Hills’s The Beloved Self. The topic is various forms of ‘Egoism.’ These are taken to be theories of practical reason – alternative answers to the question ‘what have I reason to do?’.
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  15. Hugh Chandler, -≫Tredicims' Minds.
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  16. Hugh Chandler, The Monologian Argument.
    In the first two chapters of the Monologion Anselm shows, or tries to show that “Of all the things that exist, there is one that is the best, greatest and supreme.” In this paper I examine his argument.
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  17. Hugh Chandler, The Monologion Argument for the Existence of God.
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  18. Hugh Chandler, The Monologion Argument for the Existence and Supremacy of God.
    In the first two chapters of the Monologion Anselm shows, or tries to show that “Of all the things that exist, there is one that is the best, greatest and supreme.” In this paper I examine his argument.
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  19. Hugh Chandler, -≫The Number of Minds.
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  20. Hugh Chandler, The Problem of Good.
    -/- Very few (if any) people believe that the world was created, and is maintained, by a thoroughly contemptible and malicious being. Do we have good reason for our disbelief? In the first part of this paper I offer an argument for the non-existence of such a being. According to this argument there is just too much good - too may good things - in the world for the ‘malicious being’ theory to be plausible. In the second part of the (...)
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  21. Hugh S. Chandler, -≫Borderline 'Minds'.
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  22. Hugh S. Chandler, Borderline 'Minds'.
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  23. Hugh S. Chandler, -≫Borderline "Minds&Quot;.
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  24. Hugh S. Chandler, -≫Counting Minds.
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  25. Hugh S. Chandler, Fuzzy Cooky-Cutter Classes.
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  26. Hugh S. Chandler, -≫Fuzzy Minds.
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  27. Hugh S. Chandler, How Many Minds?
    In Analysis, Vol. 45, June 1984, George Rea published a paper attacking my claim that there could be ‘indeterminate minds'. This paper is a reply to his attack. I claim, again, that such ‘minds’ are possible – entities such that it is indeterminate whether or not these entities are people with minds. -/- .
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  28. Hugh S. Chandler, -≫How Many Minds?
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