Search results for 'Hugh Harris' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Hugh Harris (1927). The Greek Origins of the Idea of Cosmopolitanism. International Journal of Ethics 38 (1):1-10.score: 240.0
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  2. Marcus J. Claesson, Ian B. Jeffery, Susana Conde, Susan E. Power, Eibhlís M. O'Connor, Siobhán Cusack, Hugh Mb Harris, Mairead Coakley, Bhuvaneswari Lakshminarayanan & Orla O'Sullivan (2012). Gut Microbiota Composition Correlates with Diet and Health in the Elderly. In Jeffrey Kastner (ed.), Nature. Mit Press. 178-184.score: 240.0
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  3. Hugh Harris (1948). Get to Know Philosophy. London, Evans Bros..score: 240.0
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  4. J. W. Harris, Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.) (2006). Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
    This book comprises essays in law and legal theory celebrating the life and work of Jim Harris. The topics addressed reflect the wide range of Harris's work, and the depth of his influence on legal studies. They include the nature of law and legal reasoning, rival theories of property rights and their impact on practical questions before the courts; the nature of precedent in legal argument; and the evolving concept of human rights and its place in legal discourse.
     
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  5. Ruth Harris (1977). Marjorie S. Harris - 1976. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 50 (4):314 - 315.score: 120.0
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  6. Joseph Harris (1995). Richard L. Harris, Ed., A Chorus of Grammars: The Correspondence of George Hickes and His Collaborators on the “Thesaurus Linguarum Septentrionalium.”(Publications of the Dictionary of Old English, 4.) Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1992. Pp. Xviii, 492; Color Frontispiece, 4 Black-and-White Plates. $69. [REVIEW] Speculum 70 (1):154-155.score: 120.0
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  7. H. S. Harris (1986). Saggio Sulla Metafisica di Harris. Idealistic Studies 16 (3):262-263.score: 120.0
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  8. Tim Harris (2013). The Intellectual Culture of Puritan Women, 1558–1680. Edited by Johanna Harris and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann. The European Legacy 18 (1):101-102.score: 120.0
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  9. Heather Harris (2005). Nobody's Ever Walked Here Before Heather Harris. In Claire Smith & Hans Martin Wobst (eds.), Indigenous Archaeologies: Decolonizing Theory and Practice. Routledge. 280.score: 120.0
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  10. E. J. Kenney (1983). U. Von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff (Tr. Alan Harris; Ed. With Introduction and Notes by Hugh Lloyd-Jones): History of Classical Scholarship. Pp. Xxxii + 189. London: Duckworth, 1982. £18. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 33 (02):376-.score: 72.0
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  11. James A. Harris (2005). Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 40.0
    The eighteenth century was a time of brilliant philosophical innovation in Britain. In Of Liberty and Necessity James A. Harris presents the first comprehensive account of the period's discussion of what remains a central problem of philosophy, the question of the freedom of the will. He offers new interpretations of contributions to the free will debate made by canonical figures such as Locke, Hume, Edwards, and Reid, and also discusses in detail the arguments of some less familiar writers. (...) puts the eighteenth-century debate about the will and its freedom in the context of the period's concern with applying what Hume calls the "experimental method of reasoning" to the human mind. His book will be of substantial interest to historians of philosophy and anyone concerned with the free will problem. (shrink)
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  12. Sarah Chan & John Harris (2009). Free Riders and Pious Sons – Why Science Research Remains Obligatory. Bioethics 23 (3):161-171.score: 40.0
    John Harris has previously proposed that there is a moral duty to participate in scientific research. This concept has recently been challenged by Iain Brassington, who asserts that the principles cited by Harris in support of the duty to research fail to establish its existence. In this paper we address these criticisms and provide new arguments for the existence of a moral obligation to research participation. This obligation, we argue, arises from two separate but related principles. The principle (...)
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  13. George W. Harris (2006). Reason's Grief: An Essay on Tragedy and Value. Cambridge University Press.score: 40.0
    In Reason's Grief, George Harris takes W. B. Yeats's comment that we begin to live only when we have conceived life as tragedy as a call for a tragic ethics, something the modern West has yet to produce. He argues that we must turn away from religious understandings of tragedy and the human condition and realize that our species will occupy a very brief period of history, at some point to disappear without a trace. We must accept an ethical (...)
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  14. John Harris (2012). What It's Like to Be Good. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (03):293-305.score: 40.0
    In this issue of CQ we introduce a new feature, in which noted bioethicists are invited to reflect on vital current issues. Our first invitee, John Harris, will subsequently assume editorship of this section.
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  15. R. Baine Harris (ed.) (1976). The Significance of Neoplatonism. Distributed by State University of New York Press.score: 40.0
    A Brief Description of Neoplatonism R. Baine Harris Old Dominion University There are essentially three ways in which Neoplatonism may be considered to be ...
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  16. Errol E. Harris (2000). Apocalypse and Paradigm: Science and Everyday Thinking. Praeger.score: 40.0
    Harris seeks to diagnose the ailment that infects contemporary thinking and prevents adequate measures from being taken to counter the dangerous effect of the ...
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  17. John Harris (2007). Enhancing Evolution: The Ethical Case for Making Better People. Princeton University Press.score: 40.0
    In Enhancing Evolution, leading bioethicist John Harris dismantles objections to genetic engineering, stem-cell research, designer babies, and cloning and makes an ethical case for biotechnology that is both forthright and rigorous.
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  18. Nigel Harris (2003). The Return of Cosmopolitan Capital: Globalisation, the State, and War. In the U.S. And Canada Distributed by Palgrave Macmillan.score: 40.0
    Nigel Harris argues that the notion of national capital is becoming redundant as cities and their citizens, increasingly unaffected by borders and national boundaries, take center stage in the economic world. Harris deconstructs this phenomenon and argues for the immense benefits it could and should have, not just for western wealth, but for economies worldwide, for international communication and for global democracy.
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  19. David Harris (2003). Teaching Yourself Social Theory. Sage Publications.score: 40.0
    `Social theory is a very difficult subject to teach and it is one that students generally find hard to get to grips with. Teaching Yourself Social Theory offers a highly original and comprehensive resource that will be welcomed by students and teachers alike' - Barry Smart, University of Portsmouth `I have no hesitation in recommending Harris' text to students and teachers of social theory' - Sociology This refreshing and accessible text demonstrates how social theory can be made into an (...)
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  20. Michael J. Harris (2013). Audi Rationality and Religious Commitment (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011). Pp. Xvi + 311. £25.00 (Hbk). ISBN 978 0 19 960957 4. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 49 (1):130-134.score: 40.0
    Book Reviews MICHAEL J. HARRIS, Religious Studies , FirstView Article(s).
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  21. John Harris (1992). Wonderwoman and Superman: The Ethics of Human Biotechnology. Oxford University Press.score: 40.0
    Since the birth of the first test-tube baby, Louise Brown, in 1977, we have seen truly remarkable advances in biotechnology. We can now screen the fetus for Down Syndrome, Spina Bifida, and a wide range of genetic disorders. We can rearrange genes in DNA chains and redirect the evolution of species. We can record an individual's genetic fingerprint. And we can potentially insert genes into human DNA that will produce physical warning signs of cancer, allowing early detection. In fact, biotechnology (...)
     
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  22. Kathleen H. Corriveau, Angie L. Kim, Courtney E. Schwalen & Paul L. Harris (2009). Abraham Lincoln and Harry Potter: Children's Differentiation Between Historical and Fantasy Characters. Cognition 113 (2):213-225.score: 40.0
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  23. John Harris (2004). On Cloning. Routledge.score: 40.0
    Cloning - few words have as much potential to grip our imagination or grab the headlines. No longer the stuff of science fiction or Star Wars - it is happening now. Yet human cloning is currently banned throughout the world, and therapeutic cloning banned in many countries. In this highly controversial book, John Harris does a lot more than ask why we are so afraid of cloning. He presents a deft and informed defence of human cloning, carefully exposing the (...)
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  24. John Harris (ed.) (2001). Bioethics. OUP Oxford.score: 40.0
    The Oxford Readings in Philosophy series brings together important recent writing in major areas of philosophical enquiry, selected from a variety of sources which may not be conveniently available to the university student or general reader. In this volume, John Harris presents the examples of the very best philosophical writing in bioethics from an internationally renowned list of contributors; authors featured include Peter Singer, Helga Kuhse, Tom Beauchamp, Ruth Macklin, and Ronald Dworkin. The book begins with a substantial overview (...)
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  25. Daniel Harris (2000). Cute, Quaint, Hungry, and Romantic: The Aesthetics of Consumerism. Basic Books.score: 40.0
    Why has the ring of the telephone become a beep? What ever happened to the bumpers and fenders of cars? Why do food commercials never mention hunger?In this encyclopedia of low-brow aesthetics, Daniel Harris concentrates on the nuances of non-art, the uses of the useless, the politics of product design and advertising. We learn how advertisers exaggerate our sensual responses to eating, how close-up nature photography exaggerates the accessibility of the natural world, and how the mutated physiology of dolls (...)
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  26. Sam Harris (2012). Free Will. Free Press.score: 40.0
    A BELIEF IN FREE WILL touches nearly everything that human beings value. It is difficult to think about law, politics, religion, public policy, intimate relationships, morality—as well as feelings of remorse or personal achievement—without first imagining that every person is the true source of his or her thoughts and actions. And yet the facts tell us that free will is an illusion. In this enlightening book, Sam Harris argues that this truth about the human mind does not undermine morality (...)
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  27. Henry Harris (ed.) (1995). Identity: Essays Based on Herbert Spencer Lectures Given in the University of Oxford. Clarendon Press.score: 40.0
    Who am I, and what am I? The question is one asked through the ages, answered in various ways in different disciplines. Identity is a matter of intellectual interest but also of personal and practical interest, attracting attention and stimulating controversy outside the ranks of the specialists. This volume offers a comparison and cross-fertilization of insights and theories from various disciplines in which identity is a key concept. -/- Identity contains essays by six internationally famous contributors, focusing on different facets (...)
     
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  28. Rom Harré & Roy Harris (eds.) (1993). Linguistics and Philosophy: The Controversial Interface. Pergamon Press.score: 40.0
    As hopes that generative linguistics might solve philosophical problems about the mind give way to disillusionment, old problems concerning the relationship between linguistics and philosophy survive unresolved. This collection surveys the historical engagement between the two, and opens up avenues for further reflection. In Part 1 two contrasting views are presented of the interface nowadays called 'philosophy of linguistics'. Part 2 gives a detailed historical survey of the engagement of analytic philosophy with linguistic problems during the present century, and sees (...)
     
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  29. J. W. Harris (2002). Property and Justice. OUP Oxford.score: 40.0
    When philosophers put forward claims for or against 'property', it is often unclear whether they are talking about the same thing that lawyers mean by 'property'. Likewise, when lawyers appeal to 'justice' in interpreting or criticizing legal rules we do not know if they have in mind something that philosophers would recognize as 'justice'. -/- Bridging the gulf between juristic writing on property and speculations about it appearing in the tradition of western political philosophy, Professor Harris has built from (...)
     
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  30. Michele Harris (2013). Striking the Wrong Note: Sixth Anniversary of the Northern Territory Intervention. Australian Humanist, The 112:1.score: 40.0
    Harris, Michele Aboriginal advocate Olga Havnen, in her Lowitja O'Donoghue oration, has asked a critical question. She asks what has been the psychological impact of the Intervention on Aboriginal people of the Northern Territory (NT). It is surprising that so little attention has been given to this critical, yet in some ways tenuous, link before now.
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  31. Sam Harris (2010). The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values. Free Press.score: 40.0
    Bestselling author Sam Harris dismantles the most common justification for religious faith-that a moral system cannot be based on science.
     
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  32. Hugh V. McLachlan (2010). John Harris, Enhancing Evolution: The Ethical Case for Making Better People Princeton University Press, 2007, 260 PAGES, $27.95/£ 16. 95 hardbackH A RBACK, ISBN1: 978-0-9 1-128-44-3. [REVIEW] Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 15 (1):40.score: 24.0
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  33. Thomas Ahnert & Susan Manning (eds.) (2011). Character, Self and Sociability in the Scottish Enlightenment. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: -- Reid and Hume on the Possibility of Character--James A. Harris * Adam Smith's Rhetorical Art of Character--Stephen McKenna * The Moral Education of Mankind: Character and Religious Moderatism in the Sermons of Hugh Blair--Thomas Ahnert * The Not-So-Prodigal Son: James Boswell and the Scottish Enlightenment--Anthony La Vopa * Character, Sociability and Correspondence: Elizabeth Griffith and The Letters between Henry and Frances--Eve Tavor Bannet * Smellie's Dreams: Character and Consciousness in the Scottish Enlightenment--Phyllis Mack (...)
     
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  34. John Eekelaar & John Bell (eds.) (1987). Oxford Essays in Jurisprudence. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This third book in the Oxford Essays in Jurisprudence series continues the established format and includes contributions from distinguished scholars in the field, each attempting to relate legal theory to specific areas of the law. Among the eminent contributors are Andrew Ashworth, Peter Cane, Hugh Collins, Anne de Moor, Jim Harris, Simon Lee, Bernard Rudden, and Christopher McCrudden.
     
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  35. Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.) (2010). The Ethical Life: Fundamental Readings in Ethics and Moral Problems. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Introduction -- Value theory : the nature of the good life -- Epicurus letter to Menoeceus -- John Stuart Mill, Hedonism -- Aldous Huxley, Brave new world -- Robert Nozick, The experience machine -- Richard Taylor, The meaning of life -- Jean Kazez, Necessities -- Normative ethics : theories of right conduct -- J.J.C. Smart, Eextreme and restricted utilitarianism -- Immanuel Kant the good will & the categorical imperative -- Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan -- Philippa Foot, Natural goodness -- Aristotle, Nicomachean (...)
     
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  36. Michael Gorman (2003). Hugh of Saint Victor. In Noone Gracia (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Philosophy in the Middle Ages. Blackwell.score: 18.0
    An overview of Hugh’s thought, focusing on philosophical issues. Specifically it gives a summary of his overall vision; the sources he worked from; his understanding of: the division of the science, biblical interpretation, God, creation, providence and evil, human nature and ethics, salvation; and his spiritual teachings.
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  37. Thomas Douglas (2013). Moral Enhancement Via Direct Emotion Modulation: A Reply to John Harris. Bioethics 27 (3):160-168.score: 18.0
    Some argue that humans should enhance their moral capacities by adopting institutions that facilitate morally good motives and behaviour. I have defended a parallel claim: that we could permissibly use biomedical technologies to enhance our moral capacities, for example by attenuating certain counter-moral emotions. John Harris has recently responded to my argument by raising three concerns about the direct modulation of emotions as a means to moral enhancement. He argues (1) that such means will be relatively ineffective in bringing (...)
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  38. Alberto Oscar Cupani (2010). Valores e atividade científica, de Hugh Lacey. Principia 2 (2):281-290.score: 18.0
    Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Review of: Lacey, Hugh. Valores e atividade científica /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabela normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}.
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  39. Iain Brassington (2007). John Harris' Argument for a Duty to Research. Bioethics 21 (3):160–168.score: 15.0
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  40. Whitley Kaufman (2012). Can Science Determine Moral Values? A Reply to Sam Harris. Neuroethics 5 (1):55-65.score: 12.0
    Sam Harris’ new book “The Moral Landscape” is the latest in a series of attempts to provide a new “science of morality.” This essay argues that such a project is unlikely to succeed, using Harris’ text as an example of the major philosophical problems that would be faced by any such theory. In particular, I argue that those trying to construct a scientific ethics need pay far more attention to the tradition of moral philosophy, rather than assuming the (...)
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  41. Hugh J. Silverman (1980). Hugh J. Silverman — From Utopia/Dystopia to Heterotopia: An Interpretive Topology. Philosophy and Social Criticism 7 (2):170-182.score: 12.0
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  42. R. Sparrow (2012). Fear of a Female Planet: How John Harris Came to Endorse Eugenic Social Engineering. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (1):4-7.score: 12.0
    In this paper, I respond to criticisms by John Harris, contained in a commentary on my article “Harris, harmed states, and sexed bodies”, which appeared in the Journal of Medical Ethics, volume 37, number 5. I argue that Harris's response to my criticisms exposes the strong eugenic tendencies in his own thought, when he suggests that the reproductive obligations of parents should be determined with reference to a claim about what would enhance ‘society’ or ‘the species’.
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  43. Alex Voorhoeve (2010). Review of Hugh LaFolette: The Practice of Ethics. [REVIEW] Social Choice and Welfare 34:497-501.score: 12.0
    A review of Hugh LaFolette's Practical Ethics.
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  44. Sid Z. Leiman (1983). Therapeutic Homicide: A Philosophic and Halakhic Critique of Harris' 'Survival Lottery'. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 8 (3):257-268.score: 12.0
    In a well-known paper entitled, ‘Survival Lottery’, published in a philosophical journal, John Harris proposed for discussion an interesting idea for saving the lives of certain kinds of patients who are at the point of death. Let us assume that there are two such patients, one that could be saved by a heart transplant and the other by the transplantation of a pair of lungs. However, no suitable organs are available for this purpose. Might it perhaps not be immoral (...)
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  45. S. M. Reindal (2000). Disability, Gene Therapy and Eugenics - a Challenge to John Harris. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (2):89 - 94.score: 12.0
    This article challenges the view of disability presented by Harris in his article, “Is gene therapy a form of eugenics?”1 It is argued that his definition of disability rests on an individual model of disability, where disability is regarded as a product of biological determinism or “personal tragedy” in the individual. Within disability theory this view is often called “the medical model” and it has been criticised for not being able to deal with the term “disability”, but only with (...)
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  46. J. McKie, H. Kuhse, J. Richardson & P. Singer (1996). Double Jeopardy, the Equal Value of Lives and the Veil of Ignorance: A Rejoinder to Harris. Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (4):204-208.score: 12.0
    Harris levels two main criticisms against our original defence of QALYs (Quality Adjusted Life Years). First, he rejects the assumption implicit in the QALY approach that not all lives are of equal value. Second, he rejects our appeal to Rawls's veil of ignorance test in support of the QALY method. In the present article we defend QALYs against Harris's criticisms. We argue that some of the conclusions Harris draws from our view that resources should be allocated on (...)
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  47. Kristie Dotson (2013). Querying Leonard Harris' Insurrectionist Standards. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (1):74-92.score: 12.0
    Leonard Harris’ “Insurrectionist Ethics: Advocacy, Moral Psychology, and Pragmatism” challenges pragmatist moral theories to meet standards that render insurrectionist acts not only permissible, but also dutiful (Harris 2002). Using examples of U.S. slave insurrections, Harris defines slave insurrectionist acts as acts aimed at the “absolute destruction of slaveholders and the bonds of servitude” (2002, 204). Following Harris, I define general insurrectionist acts as any action aimed at the absolute destruction of one’s oppressor and the bonds of (...)
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  48. Hugh Maccoll (1905). Hugh MacColl: Existential Import of Propositions. Mind 14 (3):401-402.score: 12.0
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  49. Andrea Sauchelli (2014). Life Extension and the Burden of Mortality: Leon Kass Versus John Harris. Journal of Medical Ethics 40:336-40.score: 12.0
    Some bioethicists have questioned the desirability of a line of biomedical research aimed at extending the length of our lives over what some think to be its natural limit. In particular, Leon Kass has argued that living longer is not such a great advantage, and that mortality is not a burden after all. In this essay, I evaluate his arguments in favour of such a counterintuitive view by elaborating upon some critical remarks advanced by John Harris. Ultimately, I argue (...)
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