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Profile: Hugh P. McDonald (City University of New York)
  1.  17
    Hugh P. McDonald (2008). Does Nature Exist? Towards a Critique of Nature and Naturalism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 44:63-72.
    To bring our topic within manageable limits, the attempt will be made to approach the philosophy of nature in a systematic manner. Borrowing the quantitative categories of one, some and all, nature will be treated as first as singular, then a whole or totality and finally discussed in terms of various distinctions which set nature apart as a part. Past philosophic treatments will be discussed when germane to this treatment, as an example of a particular view of nature. I will (...)
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  2.  11
    Hugh Mcdonald (2007). Experience and Philosophy: On the Work of John J. McDermott. [REVIEW] Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 35 (106):58-60.
  3.  19
    Hugh P. Mcdonald (2009). Principles: The Principles of Principles. The Pluralist 4 (3):98 - 126.
    In this essay, I will argue for the actuality of principles. Principles are normative in that they regulate the relation of actuality and potentiality as well as operate across time, from the past and present to the future. They may also apply across space, that is, that the same principle operates in different places in the same way, for example the laws of motion. Principles mean that change follows certain regularities. I will examine the modality of principles, the relation to (...)
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  4.  4
    Hugh P. McDonald (2009). Principles: The Principles of Principles. The Pluralist 4 (3):98-126.
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  5.  22
    Hugh P. McDonald (2002). Dewey's Naturalism. Environmental Ethics 24 (2):189-208.
    In the recent literature of environmental ethics, certain criticisms of pragmatism in general and Dewey in particular have been made, specifically, that certain features of pragmatism make it unsuitable as an environmental ethic. Eric Katz asserts that pragmatism is an inherently anthropocentric and subjective philosophy. Bob Pepperman Taylor argues that Dewey’s naturalism in particular is anthropocentric in that it concentrates on human nature. I challenge both of these views in the context of Dewey’s naturalism. I discuss his naturalism, his critique (...)
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  6.  2
    Hugh P. Mcdonald (ed.) (2004). Radical Axiology: A First Philosophy of Values. Rodopi.
    This book treats values as the basis for all of philosophy, an approach distinct from critiquing theories of value and far rarer. “First Philosophy,” the effort to justify the foundations for a system of philosophy, is one of the main issues that divide philosophers today. McDonald’s philosophy of values is a comprehensive attempt to replace philosophies of “existence,” “being,” “experience,” the “subject,” or “language,” with a philosophy that locates value as most basic. This transformation is a radical move within Western (...)
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  7. Hugh P. McDonald (2003). John Dewey and Environmental Philosophy. State University of New York Press.
    A comprehensive look at how John Dewey's ethics can inform environmental issues.
     
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  8.  5
    Hugh McDonald (2005). On Pragmatism (Review). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 41 (2):435-439.
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  9.  17
    Hugh McDonald (2001). Toward a Deontological Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 23 (4):411-430.
    In this paper, I outline both a nonanthropocentric and non-subjective theory of intrinsic value which incorporates pragmatism in environmental ethics in a novel way. The theory, which I call creative actualization, is a non-hierarchical, nonsubjective theory of value which includes the value of nonhuman species and the biosphere. I argue that there are conditions to such values. These limitations include evaluations of actual improvement (meliorism) and reciprocity as conditions. These conditions are necessary limitations upon actions, i.e., duties. I incorporate a (...)
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  10.  8
    Hugh P. McDonald (2008). Can Environmental Ethics Become a First Philosophy? Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 4:75-83.
    I briefly discuss first philosophy (metaphysics), including different “paradigms’ of first philosophy in the history of Western philosophy. I then discuss the rise of environmental ethics as a new field of philosophy and the debate over anthropocentric and non-anthropocentric values. I suggest that ecocentric value theories could constitute a new first philosophy using the “paradigm” of value in first philosophy and why they should constitute a first philosophy.
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  11. Hugh Mcdonald (2005). Cornelis de Waal, On Pragmatism. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 41 (2):435-439.
  12.  5
    Hugh P. McDonald (2005). "The Problem with" Brain". Contemporary Pragmatism 2 (2):93-126.
    Mind cannot be reduced to "brain states" since "brain" is a reconstruction from experience. I begin with the "identity" view and then consider less reductive physicalist views. I criticize the dualistic view, and argue for unique features of mind that separate it from anything physical, particularly perspective. I then argue for Mead's view of the formation and development of mind in a social context. The plasticity of minds, along with privacy of experience argue against identification with any physical correlate. I (...)
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  13.  9
    Hugh McDonald (2004). Pragmatism and Values. [REVIEW] Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 32 (99):48-50.
  14.  1
    Hugh G. McDonald (2006). Creative Actualization: A Pluralist Theory of Value. Contemporary Pragmatism 3 (2):117-150.
    This paper presents a basically new theory of values. Potential goods such as flying machines have been creatively actualized and thus value is creative actualization. Norms, ideals, standards, and theories also require creative actualization. As actions melioristically transform the world for the better, the goals of action provide purpose and meaning, as well as the ground of change, a superior goal providing the end for which agents undertake action. The kinds of value represent irreducibly plural categories of good: beauty, knowledge, (...)
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  15.  4
    Hugh McDonald (2007). Experience and Philosophy. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 35 (106):58-60.
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  16. Hugh P. McDonald (2008). Axiology. American Philosophy an Encyclopedia:66-68.
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  17. Hugh P. McDonald (2000). Does Nature Exist? Contemporary Philosophy (5 & 6).
     
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  18. Hugh P. McDonald (ed.) (2014). Environmental Philosophy: A Revaluation of Cosmopolitan Ethics From an Ecocentric Standpoint. Editions Rodopi.
    Environmental Philosophy: A Revaluation of Cosmopolitan Ethics from an Ecocentric Standpoint calls for a new approach to ethics. Starting from the necessity for all life of air, water, and food, the book revalues the relation of ethics and environmentalism. Using insights of the environmental ethicists, environmental ethics becomes the model for ethics as a whole. Humans are part of a larger environment. Cosmopolitanism should be revised in accord with environmental ethics. The book applies a new theory of values to the (...)
     
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  19. Hugh Mcdonald (2009). Environmental Philosophy’s Challenge to Humanism: Revaluing Cosmopolitan Ethics. Free Inquiry 30:36-40.
  20. Hugh Mcdonald (2012). Introduction. Contemporary Pragmatism 9 (1):1-3.
    This issue of Contemporary Pragmatism is devoted to pragmatism and environmental ethics. My introduction surveys the current situation at the intersection of these two fields, and the contributions of this issue's eleven articles.
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  21. Hugh P. Mcdonald (2012). Pragmatism and Environmentalism. Rodopi.
    The growing literature on Environmental Ethics has ballooned into a separate sub-field within philosophy, involving ethical studies concerning the value of other species, of ecosystems, and of the environment of all living things as a whole. Some consider Environmental Ethics to be a revolution in ethics which will completely change the human-centered orientation of morals and reorient it to include all species, ecosystems or the larger biosphere. This volume explores pragmatist approaches to ethics that can be used for environmental issues. (...)
     
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  22. Hugh P. McDonald (ed.) (2012). Speculative Evaluations: Essays on a Pluralistic Universe. Editions Rodopi.
    This book evaluates competing theories on speculative topics, such as nature, technology, space, time, and the relation of mind and matter. The general thesis is the actuality of principles in the form of laws, norms and other general principles in a plastic world, tying together the actualization of “oughts” and other principles. The result is a pluralistic universe, endorsing the pragmatic view of the world. The book examines nature, being, reality and other traditional issues in this light, critically evaluating many (...)
     
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  23. Hugh P. McDonald (2010). The End of the End of History. Bajo Pallabro, Revista de Filosophia (5):253-268.