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  1. Hugh Upton, REVIEWSphin_1423 380..386.
    It is a familiar idea that in learning to do philosophy we have to acquire new habits of thought, a supposition that may help explain why it does not happen quickly and why, especially in retrospect, the process has something of the feeling of an upbringing, of being gradually drawn into a distinctive way of life. Familiar also, to many, will be the instruction to concentrate purely on the arguments of those philosophers we study, ignoring the irrelevancies of character and (...)
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  2. Neil Pickering & Hugh Upton (forthcoming). David Greaves, Martyn Evans, Derek Morgan. Regional Developments in Bioethics.
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  3. Hugh Upton (2012). Presumed Consent and Organ Donation. Clinical Ethics 7 (3):142-146.
    This article explores the meaning and moral significance of presumed consent with particular reference to an opt-out policy for postmortem organ donation. It does so under two general categories: circumstances where we believe consent to have been given and those where we have no reason to believe that it has either been given or been refused. In the context of an opt-out policy, the first category would relate to the idea of tacit consent. It is argued both that substituting the (...)
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  4. Hugh Upton (2011). Can There Be a Moral Duty to Cheat in Sport? Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (2):161 - 174.
    Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, Volume 5, Issue 2, Page 161-174, May 2011.
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  5. Hugh Upton (2011). Moral Theory and Theorizing in Health Care Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (4):431-443.
    This paper takes up the question of the role of philosophical moral theory in our attempts to resolve the ethical problems that arise in health care, with particular reference to the contention that we need theory to be determinative of our choice of actions. Moral theorizing is distinguished from moral theories and the prospects for determinacy from the latter are examined through a consideration of the most promising candidates: utilitarianism, deontology and the procedures involved in reflective equilibrium. It is argued (...)
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  6. Hugh Upton (2010). REVIEWS: Conversations on Ethics – By Alex Voorhoeve. [REVIEW] Philosophical Investigations 33 (4):380-383.
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  7. Hugh Upton (2008). Ethics: The Fundamentals - by Julia Driver. Philosophical Books 49 (3):276-277.
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  8. Cynthia Townley, Evan Tiffany & Hugh Upton (2005). Ethics. Philosophical Books 46 (2):174-178.
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  9. Hugh Upton (2005). Personal Identity. Nursing Philosophy 6 (1):77-79.
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  10. Hugh Upton (2004). International Journal of Ethics ISSN 1535-4776 Volume 4Number L, Pp. 101-112© 2004 Nova Science Publishers, Inc. International Journal of Ethics: Ije 4:101.
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  11. Hugh Upton (2003). Ethical Theories and Practical Problems. Nursing Philosophy 4 (2):170–172.
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  12. Hugh Upton (2000). Scarre on Evil Pleasures. Utilitas 12 (01):97-.
    Utilitarianism faces a difficulty in that what are typically regarded as natural goods seem to have possible occurrences that strike most people as morally reprehensible, yet which according to the theory must be taken to add to the good in the world. Thus, totake a recent treatment of the problem by Geoffrey Scarre, it would seem that even sadistic pleasures must contribute to human happiness and thus morally offset the concomitant suffering of the victim. Scarre has offered a defence of (...)
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  13. Hugh Upton (2000). Right-Based Morality and Hohfeld's Relations. Journal of Ethics 4 (3):237-256.
    The paper begins by defending the Hohfeldianaccount of rights (as equivalence relations) from thecharge that it cannot capture their specialsignificance, and thus cannot be used in a right-basedmoral theory. It goes on to argue that, because of amisunderstanding of this relational account, theconception of right-based morality that has emerged inrecent years has been variously flawed from theoutset. A particular form of explanatory priority waswrongly taken to be essential, and then eitherincoherently combined with equivalence, or taken to bea reason for rejecting (...)
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  14. Hugh Upton & Ross Harrison (1996). Democracy. Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):271.
    Democracy surrounds us like the air we breath, and is normally taken very much for granted. Across the world democracy has become accepted as an unquestionably good thing. Yet upon further examination the merits of democracy are both paradoxical and problematic, and the treasured values of liberty and equality can be used to argue both for and against it. In the historical section of the book, Ross Harrison clearly traces the history of democracy by examining the works of, amongst others, (...)
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  15. Hugh Upton (1994). ETHICS Life and Death: Philosophical Essays in Biomedical Ethics. Philosophical Books 35 (4):275-276.
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  16. Hugh Upton (1993). On Applying Moral Theories. Journal of Applied Philosophy 10 (2):189-199.
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  17. Hugh Upton, John Horton & Susan Mendus (1993). John Locke: A Letter Concerning Toleration -- In Focus. Philosophical Quarterly 43 (173):539.
  18. Hugh Upton & David Lamb (1991). Organ Transplants and Ethics. Philosophical Quarterly 41 (164):381.
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  19. Hugh Upton (1988). The Foundations of Bioethics. Philosophical Books 29 (2):99-102.
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  20. Hugh Upton (1987). Discussions. Mind 96 (383):381-385.
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  21. Hugh Upton (1987). Rights and Duties--A Reply to Gewirth. Mind 96 (383):381-385.
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  22. Hugh Upton (1986). Book-Reviews. Mind 95 (379):398-400.
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