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  1. Hugh V. McLachlan (forthcoming). On the Random Distribution of Scarce Doses of Vaccine in Response to the Threat of an Influenza Pandemic: A Response to Wardrope. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101516.
    Wardrope argues against my proposed non-consequentialist policy for the distribution of scarce influenza vaccine in the face of a pandemic. According to him, even if one accepts what he calls my deontological ethical theory, it does not follow that we are required to agree with my proposed randomised allocation of doses of vaccine by means of a lottery. He argues in particular that I fail to consider fully the prophylactic role of vaccination whereby it serves to protect from infection more (...)
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  2. Hugh V. McLachlan (2010). Abortion and Dawkins' Fallacious Account of the So-Called 'Great Beethoven Fallacy'. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 15 (2):44-54.
    In his discussion of ethics and abortion, Prof. Richard Dawkins makes the provocative claim that: ‘The Great Beethoven Fallacy is a typ ical example of the kind of logical mess we get into when our minds are befuddled by religiously inspired absolutism.’ (Dawkins, p. 339) This supposed fallacy is presented as if it exemplified not only a particular view of abortion held, for instance, by certain fundamentalist Christians but as if it revealed some flaw that is characteristic of the thinking (...)
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  3. Hugh V. McLachlan (2010). Andy Miah and Emma Rich, The Medicalization of Cyberspace. ROUTLEDGE, 2 008, P P. 1 0+ X V, Hb, ISBN 10: 0-15-7 2 2-X,£ 70, Pb., ISBN 10: 0-15-9-7,£ 21.99. [REVIEW] Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 15 (1):40.
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  4. Hugh V. McLachlan (2010). John Harris, Enhancing Evolution: The Ethical Case for Making Better People Princeton University Press, 2007, 260 PAGES, $27.95/£ 16. 95 hardbackH A RBACK, ISBN1: 978-0-9 1-128-44-3. [REVIEW] Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 15 (1):40.
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  5. Hugh V. McLachlan (2010). Moral Rights to Life, Both Natural and Non-Natural: Reflections on James Griffin's Account of Human Rights. Diametros 26:58-76.
    Rather than to focus upon a particular ‘right to life’, we should consider what rights there are pertaining to our lives and to our living. There are different sorts. There are, for instance, rights that constitute absences of particular duties and rights that correspond to the duties of other agents or agencies. There are also natural and non-natural rights and duties. Different people in different contexts can have different moral duties and different moral rights including rights to life. The question (...)
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  6. Hugh V. McLachlan (2010). Moral Rights to Life, Both Natural and Non-Natural: Reflections on James Griffin. Diametros 26:58-76.
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  7. Hugh V. McLachlan (2010). Robert P. George and Christopher Tollefsen Embryo: A Defense of Human Life. Do Ubleday Publishers, 2008, 256 Pages, $27.95, Hb., Isbn: 978-0-8 5-52282-3 (0-8 5-52282-7). [REVIEW] Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 15 (1):40.
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  8. Hugh V. McLachlan (2008). Genetic Morality – David Shaw. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):564–566.
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  9. Mhairi Galbraith, Hugh V. McLachlan & J. Kim Swales (2005). Commercial Agencies and Surrogate Motherhood: A Transaction Cost Approach. Health Care Analysis 13 (1):11-31.
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  10. Hugh V. McLachlan (2005). Unique Persons and the Replicable Gene-Sets of Their Reproducible Bodies: A Defence of Human Cloning. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 11 (2).
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  11. Hugh V. McLachlan & J. Kim Swales (2005). Surrogate Motherhood: Beyond the Warnock and Brazier Reports. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 11 (1):12.
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  12. Hugh V. McLachlan (2003). Human Reproduction and Rights of Action and of Recipience. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 10 (2):45-48.
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  13. Hugh V. McLachlan (2002). Persons and Their Bodies: How We Should Think About Human Embryos. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 10 (2):155-164.
    The status of human embryos is discussedparticularly in the light of the claim by Fox,in Health Care Analysis 8 that itwould be useful to think of them in terms ofcyborg metaphors.It is argued that we should consider humanembryos for what they are – partiallyformed human bodies – rather than for what theyare like in some respects (and unlike inothers) – cyborgs.However to settle the issue of the status ofthe embryo is not to answer the moral questionswhich arise concerning how embryos (...)
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  14. Hugh V. McLachlan (2001). Bodies, Persons and Research on Human Embryos. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 8 (1):4-6.
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  15. Hugh V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales (2001). Exploitation and Commercial Surrogate Motherhood. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 7 (1):8--14.
    Various authors, for instance Elizabeth Anderson, Rosemary Tong, Mary Warnock and Margaret Brazier have argued that commercial surrogate motherhood is exploitative and that it should be prohibited. Their arguments are unconvincing. Exploitation is a more complex notion than it is usually presented as being. Unequal bargaining power can be a cause of exploitation but the exercise of unequal bargaining power is not inevitably or inherently exploitative. Exploitation concerns unfair and/or unjust strategies - rather than the exercise of power as such. (...)
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  16. Hugh V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales (2001). Surrogate Motherhood, Rights and Duties: A Reply to Campbell. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 9 (1):101-107.
    In a recent article in Health Care Analysis (Vol. 8, No. 1),Campbell misrepresents our specific arguments about commercialsurrogate motherhood (C.S.M.) and our general philosophical andpolitical views by saying or suggesting that we are `Millsian'liberals and consequentialists. He gives too the false impressionthat we do not oppose, in principle, slavery and child purchase.Here our position on C.S.M. is re-expressed and elaborated uponin order to eliminate possible confusion. Our general ethical andphilosophical framework is also outlined and shown to be otherthan Campbell says (...)
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  17. Hugh V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales (2000). Babies, Child Bearers and Commodification: Anderson, Brazier Et Al., and the Political Economy of Commercial Surrogate Motherhood. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 8 (1):1-18.
    It is argued by Anderson and also in the BrazierReport that Commercial Surrogate Motherhood (C.S.M.)contracts and agencies should be illegal on thegrounds that C.S.M. involves the commodification ofboth mothers and babies. This paper takes issue withthis view and argues that C.S.M. is not inconsistentwith the proper respect for, and treatment of,children and women. A case for the legalisation ofC.S.M. is made.
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  18. Hugh V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales (1999). A Drunk Driver, a Sober Pedestrian and the Allocation of Tragically Scarce and Indivisible Emergency Hospital Treatment. Health Care Analysis 7 (1):5-21.
    Le Grand describes a situation where a drunk driver, who has medical insurance, is the cause of an accident in which he and a sober pedestrian, who has no medical insurance, are both equally and seriously injured. At the private hospital to which they are both taken, there is available emergency treatment for one of them only. Who should receive it? The issues raised by Le Grand's example are shown to be more interesting, more complex and less clearcut than Le (...)
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  19. Hugh V. McLachlan (1988). Gellner on Relativism in the Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 18 (1):113-117.
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  20. Hugh V. McLachlan (1977). Must We Accept Either the Conservative or the Liberal View on Abortion? Analysis 37 (4):197 - 204.
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  21. Hugh V. Mclachlan (1976). Functionalism, Causation and Explanation. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 6 (3):235-240.
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